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[CAMP    TRAVIS 

and 

Its   Part  in  the  World   War 


Copyright,  19ia 
By 
or  E.  B.  JOHNS,  U.  S.  A. 


Price  33.50 — Postage  Prepaid 


E.   B.  JOHNS,  290   BROADWAY.  NEW  YORK   CITY 


-^ 


iSL 


Printed  and  Bound  by 
Wynkoop  HALLE^mECK  Crawford  Co. 

NEW   YORK 


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■ 

• 

'^o  tl)e  memory 
of  tfje  gallant 
menhjfjogabetjjeir 
libejf  for  tfjeir 
countrp  anb  ttjorlb 

fjumblp  bebicateb. 

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CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


WOODROW  WILSON 
President  of  the  United  States 


CAMP    TRAVIS    AND    THE     WORLD     WAR 


NEWTON  D.  BAKER 

Secretary  of  War 


171 


CAMP    TRAVIS    AND    THE    WORLD    WAR 


GENERAL  PEYTON  C.  MARCH 
Chief  of  Staff,  U.  S.  A. 


8] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


GENERAL  JOHN  J.  PERSHING 
Commanding  General,  A.  E.  F. 


CAMP     TRAVIS     AND     THE     WORLD     WAR 


BRIGADIER  GENERAL  GEORGE  H.  ESTES 
Commanding  18th  Division 


10 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


THE  COMMANDING  GENERAL 


BRIGADIER -GENERAL  GEORGE  HENSON 
ESTES  came  to  Camp  Travis  to  command  the 
Thirty-fifth  Infantry  Brigade  of  the  Eighteenth 
Division,  but  upon  his  arrival  he  was  placed  in  command 
of  the  division  and  of  the  camp.  In  that  capacity  he 
directed  the  swift  organization  and  the  equally  swift 
training  throughout  the  memorable  days  when  the  pros- 
pect of  overseas  service  was  a  constant  stimulus  to  com- 
manding officer  and  rear  rank  private. 

His  previous  military  experience  had  been  varied  and 
distinguished,  both  in  an  executive  capacity  and  in  the 
field  under  fire.  He  came  to  the  Cactus  Division  from 
General  Staff  duty  at  Washington,  where  he  had  organ- 
ized and  directed  the  Statistics  Branch  of  the  General 
Staff,  and  served  as  War  Department  representative  on 
the  Requirements  Division  of  the  War  Industries  Board. 
He  saw  active  s'ervice  in  Cuba,  and  was  twice  cited  for 
distinguished  conduct  in  action  in  the  Philippines. 

General  Estes  was  bom  in  Eufaula,  Ala.,  January  30, 
1873.  He  was  graduated  from  the  U.  S.  Military  Acad- 
emy, West  Point,  N.  Y.,  in  1894,  and  was  assigned  as 
second  lieutenant.  Twentieth  Infantry,  which  he  joined  at 
Fort  Buford,  North  Dakota. 

He  accompanied  this  regiment  to  Cuba  and  partici- 
pated with  it  in  the  campaign  resulting  in  the  surrender 
of  the  Spanish  Army  at  Santiago,  July  17,  1898.  He  was 
recommended  by  his  regimental  commander  for  a  brevet 
as  captain. 

Shortly  after  returning  from  Cuba  he  accompanied  the 
Twentieth  Infantry,  in  which  he  had  now  been  promoted 
first  lieutenant,  to  the  Philippine  Islands,  arriving  there 
March  1,  1899.  He  served  with  the  regiment  in  various 
parts  of  the  Islands  until  February,  1902,  when  it  returned 
to  the  United  States.  Meanwhile  he  had  been  promoted 
captain. 

He  received  the  commendation  of  the  division  com- 
mander for  conduct  in  the  engagement  at  Mt.  Maquiling, 
August  27,  1901,  and  of  his  brigade  and  division  com- 
manders for  conduct  at  Caloocan,  Batangas,  December 
21,  1901.  After  only  eighteen  months  in  the  United 
States,  he  returned  to  the  Philippines,  leaving  San  Fran- 


cisco December  1,  1903.  Having  served  in  Luzon  and 
in  Mindanao  as  a  company  commander  and  on  the  regi- 
mental staff,  he  returned  to  the  United  States  with  his 
regiment  in  March,  1906,  and  was  stationed  at  the  Presidio 
of  Monterey,  California,  until  he  again  went  to  the  Phil- 
ippines in  June,  1909.  He  was  stationed  in  Manila  on 
regimental  staff  duty  until  August,  1910,  when  his  tour 
of  duty  as  adjutant  expired,  and  he  was  assigned  to  a 
company  of  the  Twentieth  Infantry  at  Fort  Shafter, 
Honolulu,  H.  T.,  August,  1910. 

Having  been  detailed  in  the  Subsistence  Department, 
on  December  1,  1910,  he  proceeded  to  the  United  States, 
and  after  a  course  at  the  School  for  Bakers  and  Cooks, 
at  Fort  Riley,  Kansas,  was  with  the  infantry  division, 
organized  at  Fort  Sam  Houston,  Texas,  March,  1911,  as 
a  division  staff  oflScer.  This  division  never  reached  Mex- 
ico, but  was  demobilized,  and  shortly  after  Captain  Estes 
was  assigned  to  duty  as  Quartermaster  and  Commissary 
of  Cadets  and  Treasurer,  U.  S.  M.  A.,  West  Point,  N.  Y. 

He  was  relieved  by  operation  of  the  "Manchu"  law, 
December,  1912,  and  joined  his  old  regiment,  the  Twen- 
tieth Infantry,  at  Salt  Lake  City.  In  November,  1913, 
the  regiment  was  ordered  to  the  Mexican  border  for  duty, 
and  was  stationed  at  El  Paso,  Texas.  He  was  on  duty 
as  executive  officer  of  the  Mexican  Internment  Camp  of 
five  thousand  odd  Mexican  officers  and  soldiers  and  their 
families  who  had  been  driven  across  the  Rio  Grande  by 
Villa  at  Ojinago.  This  camp  was  established  at  Fort 
Bliss,  Texas,  first,  and  afterward  moved  to  Fort  Wingate, 
New  Mexico.  In  September,  1914,  the  camp  was  broken 
up  and  the  prisoners  returned  to  Mexico. 

Shortly  after  this.  Captain  Estes  went  back  to  his 
former  detail  at  West  Point  and  served  there  until  sum- 
mer of  1917.  He  was  promoted  Major,  July  1,  1916,  and 
on  August  5,  1917,  Colonel  of  Infantry,  National  Army, 
and  assigned  to  the  Seventy-sixth  Division,  Camp  Devens, 
Mass.  He  served  with  this  division  during  its  training 
period  until  January  25,  1918,  when  he  was  detailed  on 
the  General  Staff  and  ordered  to  Washington  for  duty  in 
the  office  of  the  Chief  of  Staff.  He  was  appointed  Briga- 
dier-General, U.  S.  Army,  August  8,  1918. 


11 


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CAMP    TRAVIS     AND    THE     WORLD     WAR 


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12 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 

CAMP  TRAVIS— MOTHER  OF  ARMIES 

SHOULD  the  spirits  of  the  brave  men  of  the  Alamo  be  watching  over  the  state  made  secure  and  safe  to  humanity 
by  their  sorrows  and  sacrifices  and  deaths;  should  they  be  able  to  follow  the  events  of  the  nation  for  which  they 
made  possible  the  largest  commonwealth  of  its  union,  their  spirits  must  follow  with  pride,  mingled,  perhaps,  with 
a  certain  wistfulness,  the  naming  of  Camp  Travis,  Texas,  after  their  immortal  leader.  Colonel  William  B.  Travis,  who 
died  with  David  Crockett,  Colonel  Bowie  and  their  seven  score  men  in  the  defense  of  liberty  and  justice  in  1836. 

The  defense  of  the  Alamo,  where  one  hundred  and  forty-five  Texas  riflemen  outfought  and  held  at  bay  for  ten 
days  six  thousand  Mexican  soldiers  under  the  command  of  General  Santa  Anna,  has  made  their  name  and  memories 
live  and  brighten  as  the  years  bring  a  fuller  realization  of  their  contribution  to  the  progress  of  American  civiUzation. 

Many  of  the  thousands  of  hard  fighting  American  men  who  were  drilled  and  trained  and  schooled  at  Camp  Travis, 
received  a  new  inspiration  of  patriotism  and  devotion  to  their  country  by  their  nearness  to  these  scenes  of  the  events 
of  the  nation's  past.  They  went  forward  to  the  European  battlefields  with  brighter  eyes,  firmer  steps  and  quickened 
hearts,  determined  to  sustain  those  noble  traditions  made  sacred  by  the  burdens  borne  in  Freedom's  Gethsemane. 

The  historic  setting  of  Camp  Travis  is  enhanced  by  its  proximity  to  Fort  Sam  Houston,  named  after  the  famous 
fighting  first  President  of  the  Republic  of  Texas,  who  defeated  the  Mexican  Army  and  avenged  the  butchering  of  the 
men  of  the  Alamo. 

These  men — Houston  and  Travis — close  friends  in  life,  courageous  leaders  for  the  vanguard  of  America's  early 
struggle  for  world  democracy,  are  linked  inseparably  in  death  by  the  names  so  wisely  and  generously  bestowed  by  the 
War  Department  of  the  United  States  of  America. 

Every  man  who  has  trained  at  this  camp,  and  who  has  learned  the  real  spirit  behind  its  name,  will  live  on  in  the 
light  of  Colonel  Travis'  love  for  humanity  and  justice.  It  will,  for  them,  grow  brighter  and  brighter,  year  by  year, 
even  into  the  perfect  day.  They  will  understand  more  fully  and  teach  at  home  its  doctrines  more  willingly — the  spirit 
of  these  mighty  dead: 

"Thermopylae  had  its  messenger  of  defeat,  but  the  Alamo  had  none." 


The  history  of  Camp  Travis  begins  with  the  battle  of 
the  old  Alamo  Mission,  which' still  stands  in  the  heart  of 
the  city  of  San  Antonio,  Texas.  Toward  the  end  of  this 
ten-day  fight,  when  the  ammunition  was  almost  exhausted, 
and  it  became  evident  that  relief  could  not  reach  the 
Alamo  in  time.  Colonel  Travis  called  for  volunteers  to 
defend  the  Alamo  to  the  death.  A  line  was  drawn  across 
the  ground,  and  the  volunteers  were  directed  to  step  across 
this  line.  Every  man  responded,  including  the  famous 
David  Crockett.  Colonel  James  Bowie,  the  second  in 
command,  who  was  confined  to  his  bed  by  illness,  directed 
that  he  be  carried  across  the  line  with  the  rest. 

The  Mexicans,  under  General  Santa  Anna,  assaulted 
the  Alamo  time  after  time  only  to  be  driven  back  by  the 
Texas  riflemen,  whose  accurate  fire  piled  up  sixteen  hun- 
dred enemy  dead.  Finally,  the  Mexicans  carried  the 
fortress  by  storm  and  a  hand-to-hand  battle  ensued,  which 
lasted  until  every  man  of  the  defenders  was  killed.  The 
stubborn  resistence  offered  by  the  Texans  disorganized 
the  Mexican  Army  to  such  an  extent  that  it  delayed  its 
progress  sufficiently  to  enable  General  Sam  Houston  to 
gather  an  army  of  Texans  which  met  the  Mexican  Army 
on  the  field  of  San  Jacinto,  and  the  part  not  utterly  de- 
stroyed was  captured,  including  General  Santa  Anna,  its 
commander. 

After  the  Republic  of  Texas  became  a  part  of  the 
Union,  United  States  forces  were  stationed  at  San  An- 
tonio, and  a  military  post  has  been  maintained  almost 
continuously.  First  in  the  center  of  the  city  where  the 
Gunter  Hotel  now  stands,  and  later  from  1865  on,  at  the 
present  site  of  Fort  Sam  Houston.  At  the  close  of  the 
Mexican  War,  Colonel  U.  S.  Grant  and  Colonel  Robert 
E.  Lee,  officers  of  the  U.  S.  Army,  were  both  stationed  in 
San  Antonio. 

Fort  Sam  Houston,  as  originally  purchased,  covered  an 
area  of  584.11  acres,  and  its  stone  quadrangle  has  been 
the  center  of  military  activities  in  the  southwest  for  over 
a  half  century,  standing  as  an  immortal  monument  to  the 
courage  of  American  frontiersmen.  Most  of  the  officers 
who  have  won  distinction  in  the  American  army  have 
been  its  occupants  at  one  time  or  another,  and  the  famous 
Geronimo,  the  Apache  chieftain,  was  once  a  prisoner 
within  its  walls. 

Fort  Sam  Houston  is  situated  in  a  strategic  position, 
having  rail  and  road  communication  to  the  Gulf  of  Mex- 


ico, the  Rio  Grande  border  and  the  west,  making  it  the 
natural  p)oint  for  the  mobilization  of  troops  in  the  south- 
west when  danger  threatens.  Upward  of  one  hundred 
and  forty  acres,  lying  immediately  north  of  Fort  Sam 
Houston,  was  later  purchased  by  a  fund  obtained  chiefly 
by  subscription  from  prominent  citizens  of  San  Antonio, 
Texas,  and  was  presented  to  the  Government  as  an  addi- 
tion to  the  reservation. 

In  1911,  a  large  part  of  the  Regular  Army  was  mobilized 
at  Fort  Sam  Houston,  and  as  there  was  not  sufficient  land 
owned  by  the  Government  to  accommodate  the  troops,  an 
additional  area  northeast  of  the  post  was  leased  from  its 
owner,  Mr.  George  W.  Brackenridge,  and  a  tent  camp 
sprung  up.  This  tract  of  land,  consisting  of  1,179  acres, 
was  later  purchased  by  the  Government.  The  land  so 
purchased  formed  the  nucleus  of  the  area  now  occupied 
by  Camp  Travis.  In  1918,  the  first  citizens'  training 
camp  in  the  south  was  established  on  this  land,  in  the 
section  immediately  east  of  the  permanent  army  post. 
This  camp  was  known  as  Camp  Wilson. 

The  late  General  Frederick  Funston  was  then  com- 
mander of  the  Southern  Department,  and  the  depart- 
ment quartermaster  was  Colonel  Harry  A.  Rogers,  later 
the  quartermaster-general  of  the  American  Expeditionary 
Forces  in  France.  Before  the  first  citizens'  training  camp 
had  closed,  threatening  conditions  in  Mexico  caused  a 
second  concentration  of  troops  at  Fort  Sam  Houston,  and 
a  provisional  division  formed  from  Regular  Army  and 
National  Guard  regiments,  camped  on  the  land  northeast 
of  the  citizens'  training  camp.  The  necessity  for  increased 
area  suitable  for  military  purposes  was  apparent,  and 
under  the  direction  of  General  Funston  and  Colonel 
Rogers,  negotiations  were  opened  for  land  between  the 
government  reservation  and  the  Salado  Creek  as  far  north 
as  the  Remount  Station,  which  was  at  that  time  one  of 
the  first  aviation  training  schools  in  the  United  States. 
At  the  same  time  negotiations  were  opened  for  additional 
land  between  the  military  reservation  at  Leon  Springs  and 
Fort  Sam  Houston,  in  order  to  provide  sufficient  area  for 
target  ranges  and  manoeuver  grounds. 

After  the  death  of  General  Funston,  General  John  J. 
Pershing  succeeded  him  to  the  command  at  Fort  Sam 
Houston,  and  under  his  direction  and  the  direction  of  his 
successors,  the  acquisition  of  additional  lands,  the  neces- 
sity for  which  was  demonstrated  by  future  events,  was 


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CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


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14 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


continued.  The  purchase  of  the  lands  between  Fort  Sam 
Houston  and  the  Salado  Creek,  consisting  of  about  four- 
teen hundred  acres,  was  finally  accom]>lished  about  the 
time  diplomatic  relations  between  the  United  States  and 
Germany  were  broken.  Immediately  after  the  declara- 
tion of  war  in  April,  1917,  the  United  States  Government 
decided  to  use  San  Antonio,  Texas,  as  one  of  the  great 
concentration,  mobilization  and  training  points. 

Tentative  plans  for  the  construction  of  a  cantonment 
on  the  government  lands,  adjacent  to  the  army  post,  had 
already  been  prepared  at  Fort  Sam  Houston,  and  when 
the  necessity  for  immediate  action  arose,  these  plans  were 
modified  to  fit  existing  conditions.  Colonel  E.  T.  Hart- 
man,  later  commander  of  the  357th  Infantry,  Ninetieth 
Division,  was  in  immediate  charge  of  this  work.  Mr. 
George  H.  Kessler,  city  plan  engineer  of  St.  Louis  and 
Kansas  City,  who  had  volunteered  his  services  to  the 
Government,  was  immediately  called  to  Fort  Sam  Hous- 
ton to  assist  in  the  planning  of  the  camp.  Mr.  Kessler 
was  assisted  in  laying  out  the  details  of  water  supply  and 
distribution,  and  the  installation  of  a  suitable  and  ade- 
quate sewer  system,  by  Mr.  John  B.  Hawley,  of  Fort 
Worth,  Texas,  later  major  of  engineers  with  the  Ameri- 
can Expeditionary  Forces  in  France.  The  San  Antonio 
Water  Supply  Co.  furnished  a  pure  and  bountiful  water 
supply  from  its  wells  at  Brackenridge  Park,  and  the  San 
Antonio  Public  Service  Company  provided  the  electricity 
for  the  power  and  light  at  the  camp  over  transmission 
lines  constructed  from  the  center  of  the  city.  The  city 
of  San  Antonio  made  provision  in  its  sewer  system  for  the 
satisfactory  handling  of  the  sewage  disposal  of  the  camp. 

Lieutenant  Colonel  W.  E.  Thome  was  appointed  con- 
structing quartermaster ;  his  civilian  engineer  assistant  was 
E.  W.  Noyes.  The  actual  construction  of  the  camp  was 
contracted  to  Stone  &  Webster,  engineers  of  Boston,  Mass. 
A  railroad  system  connecting  with  both  the  Missouri, 
Kansas  and  Texas  and  Southern  Pacific  roads  was  built 


throughout  the  camp  so  that  material  could  be  delivered 
directly  on  the  ground  for  centralized  distribution  to 
points  where  it  was  needed.  Thousands  of  men  were  em- 
ployed in  the  camp  construction,  and  the  work  was  expe- 
dited in  every  possible  manner,  with  the  result  that  the 
camp  was  ready  for  occupancy  by  the  time  the  first  troops 
of  the  National  Army  began  to  arrive  in  September,  1917. 
The  camp  as  completed  is  one  of  the  best  cantonments 
in  the  United  States  and  also  one  of  the  lowest  in  cost  to 
the  Government. 

The  first  camp  commander  was  Major-General  Henry 
T.  Allen.  Under  his  direction,  the  Ninetieth  Division 
was  formed  and  trained.  This  division,  later  to  become 
famous  for  its  fighting  record  on  the  Western  Front,  was 
composed  mainly  of  troops  from  Texas  and  Oklahoma. 

The  target  range  at  Camp  Bullis,  said  to  be  one  of  the 
finest  in  the  United  States,  was  located  and  constructed 
by  direction  of  General  Allen,  and  under  the  supervision 
of  Major  John  G.  Winter.  An  area  of  4,000  acres  east 
of  Salado  Creek  was  leased  and  used  for  instruction  and 
drill  in  trench  warfare  and  for  manocuvers  in  the  open. 

During  the  time  the  Ninetieth  Division  occupied  Camp 
Travis,  thousands  of  men  were  trained  and  sent  forward 
individually  and  in  detachments  from  the  Depot  Brigade 
to  fill  up  organizations  in  other  camps  and  for  overseas 
service.  In  the  early  summer  of  1918,  the  Ninetieth 
Division  left  for  the  front.  The  concentration  of  men  for 
the  army  continued  at  Camp  Travis  throughout  the  sum- 
mer, and  on  August  22,  1918,  there  began  the  formation 
of  the  Eighteenth  Division  under  the  command  of  Briga- 
dier-General George  H.  Estes. 

When  the  history  of  the  great  war  against  Germany 
and  her  allies  is  written.  Camp  Travis  will  not  suffer  by 
comparison  with  other  camps  in  its  contribution  to  the 
nation's  part  in  a  glorious  victory  that  brought  the 
brighter  dawning  of  a  better  day  for  the  humanity  of 
the  world. 


I^^l 


WHILE  Camp  Travis  has  been  rated  as  a  leader  in 
constructive  work  along  all  lines  of  military  prog- 
ress, there  are  several  in  which  its  excellence  was 
so  remarkable  that  the  army  as  a  whole  was  glad  to  adopt 
its  plans  as  a  standard.  Orders  were  promulgated  to  this 
effect  by  the  War  Department  and  only  demobilization, 
incident  to  the  close  of  the  war,  prevented  a  full  fruition 
of  the  camp's  triumph. 

This  was  particularly  true  with  regard  to  the  receiving 
station  plan  which  was  designed  with  great  cleverness  to 
handle  the  drafted  men  with  the  minimum  of  incon- 
venience to  themselves  and  the  maximum  of  efficiency  to 
the  government,  at  the  same  time  taking  care  of  their  sur- 
plus civilian  clothing  and  equipment  in  a  manner  which 
would  insure  its  safe  delivery  at  their  homes  in  the  shortest 
possible  time.  The  plan  was  the  product  of  the  brain  of 
Major  Luther  Hoffman,  camp  personnel  officer,  and  erf"-, 
tailed  the  outlay  of  a  building  costing  $70,000  and  designed 
to  house  a  series  of  progressions  through  which  the  civilian 
draftee  would  pass,  complying  in  quick  succession  with  all 
the  requirements  of  registration,  classification,  medical 
examination,  preparations  for  psychological  and  trade 
tests,  removal  and  despatch  to  homes  by  parcel-post  of 
surplus  clothing,  issue  of  uniform,  and  other  equipment, 
including  arms  and  ordnance  and  quartermaster  supplies— 
in  short  taking  in  the  raw  draftee  and  turning  him  out  a 
soldier  ready  for  drill. 

.Another  Camp  Travis  plan  adopted  by  the  army  as  a 
model  was  the  publicity  plan  designed  and  first  operated 
here  by   Captain   Robert   C.   Lowry,   division   publicity 


officer  of  the  Ninetieth  Division,  and  later  appointed  the 
camp  morale  officer.  This  work  was  essentially  practical 
and  brought  the  military  and  co-operating  activities  into 
an  intimate  touch  with  the  homes  of  the  soldiers  through 
their  country  newspapers.  Home  folks  heard  regularly 
through  the  medium  of  interesting  personal  news  from 
their  boys  and  the  friends  of  their  boys,  and  were  kept 
informed  constantly'  as  to  the  happenings  of  camp  life  in 
all  of  its  phases.  Men  were  encouraged  to  write  letters  to 
their  home  papers  to  which  were  appended  news  of  groups 
of  men  from  certain  counties  which  these  papers  ser\-ed 
and  whose  readers  were  the  mothers,  fathers  and  sweet- 
hearts of  the  soldiers.  Fully  eleven  hundred  newspapers 
in  Texas,  Oklahoma,  Arkansas  and  New  Mexico  were  thus 
served,  not  to  mention  the  newspapers  of  the  larger  cities. 
The  service  was  a  distinctive  aid  to  morale  and,  as  such, 
received  the  commendation  of  the  War  Department. 

A  third  plan  was  that  of  the  amusement  section  which 
served  to  coordinate  the  entertainment  personnel  of  the 
camp  and  kept  it  so  organized  that  there  was  never  a  time 
when  the  camp  amusement  director,  Wade  Boteler,  was 
not  able  to  provide  programs  for  the  Y.  M.  C.  A.  or  any 
other  of  the  camp  activities.  During  periods  of  stress  this 
plan  was  so  well  in  hand  that  troupes  of  entertainers, 
carrj'ing  their  properties  and  an  impromptu  stage  on  a 
truck,  were  able  to  give  five  and  six  shows  a  night  to  cheer 
up  the  sick  and  despondent.  During  ordinary  times  these 
company  entertainers  were  listed  and  card  indexed,  so 
that  they  were  always  available  and  could  give  shows  at 
four  or  five  buildings  of  different  activities  any  night. 


15 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


A  Study  in  Geography 


[16] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


THE  SPIRIT  OF  THE  YANKS 

T  Chateau  Thierry,  the  Meuse,  the  Marne,  the 
Argonne,  is  written  in  flaming  letters  the  story 
of  how  the  Yankee  lads  played  the  greatest  game 
of  all.  There  they  will  burn  throughout  the 
years,  a  warning  to  the  future  seeker  after  world  empire,  if 
there  be  such,  that  he  cannot  disregard  the  fighting  temper 
of  America  when  he  issues  combat  orders  for  Armageddon. 

A  grateful  people  will  hallow  forever  the  memory  of  those 
gallant  souls  who  came  from  hill  and  prairie,  from 
crowded  street  and  quiet  lane,  to  beat  the  Hun  at  the 
game  he  had  been  learning  expertly  for  half  a  hundred 
years.  Not  her  riches,  not  her  broad  lands  and  great 
industries,  but  the  invincible  gay  spirit  of  her  men  was 
America's  greatest  gift  to  final  victory. 

They  learned  the  game  quickly,  and  played  it  well.  They 
played  it  in  trench  and  camp,  in  billet  and  battle  with  an 
abandon  that  was  at  once  the  despair  and  admiration  of 
their  allies.     They  played  to  win — and  they  did  win. 

The  men  of  Chateau  Thierry  and  the  Argonne  are  the 
glory  of  America  forever;  but  behind  them,  in  the  camps 
at  home,  thousands  of  the  same  breed  waited  to  take  their 
places  in  dugout  and  shell  hole.  This  book  is  largely  a 
story  of  men  who  didn't  get  to  the  front.  All  good 
soldiers  will  salute  them.  Their's,  too,  was  the  spirit 
of  Chateau  Thierry;  they,  too,  played  the  game,  and 
played  it  well. 


[17: 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


A  SPECIALIST  IN  DISCIPLINE 

A  Talk  With  Colonel  Coughlan  on  a  Familiar  Theme 


EVERY  officer  of  the  Regular  Army  who  prepared  in 
time  of  peace  for  the  great  responsibiUties  of  war, 
was  a  specialist.  He  had  a  hobby — hippology, 
equipment,  ballistics — and  rode  it  zealously.  Colonel 
Timothy  M.  Coughlan,  Cavalry,  U.  S.  A.,  was  a  specialist, 
among  other  things,  in  discipline.  Not  the  discipline 
that  manifested  itself  in  German  Schrechlicheit,  but  a 
smart,  clicking  spirit  of  soldierlily  obedience  that  would,  if 
properly  understood  and  applied, 
make  an  army  efficient  in  peace, 
efficient  and  irresistible  in  war. 

During  the  early  summer  of  1918, 
Colonel  Coughlan  was  assigned  to 
the  165th  Depot  Brigade,  Camp 
Travis,  in  command  of  the  7th 
Group.  Later  he  was  appointed 
camp  executive  officer,  one  of  the 
emergency  offices  created  by  the 
pressure  of  war.  In  the  latter  capac- 
ity it  was  his  duty  to  perform  the 
routine  of  the  camp  commander,  an 
elastic  assignment  which  could  be 
stretched  to  include  all  the  duties 
of  the  camp  commander  in  his 
absence. 

It  is,  however,  as  the  exponent  of 
a  conscientious  observance  of  the  reg- 
ulations covering  military  courtesy 
and  discipline  that  Colonel  Coughlan 
will   be   remembered    best    by    the 
officers  and  men   of  Camp   Travis 
and  the  Cactus  Division.      He  will 
be  particularly  well  remembered  by 
those  occasional  soldiers  who  made 
the    mistake    of    assuming   that   a 
certain  slight,  youthful  appearing  soldier  who  wore  eagles 
on  his  shoulder  straps   wasn't  greatly  interested  in  the 
manner    in    which    they    discharged    their    military 
duties. 

"I  can't  get  away  from  it,"  the  Colonel  explained.  "I 
can't  let  any  man  pass  who  fails  to  observe  the  rules  for 
military  courtesy.  Only  a  few  minutes  ago,  I  looked  out 
of  my  window  and  saw  an  enlisted  man  salute  an  officer 
promptly,  and  I  saw  the  officer  return  it  with  a  flourish  of  a 
newspaper.  I  sent  out  for  that  young  man  and  had  him 
report  to  me,"  he  added  with  a  crisp  smile. 

"If  I  am  deeply  interested  in  discipline,  it  is  because  I 
know  that  without  it  there  is  no  Army."  General 
Pershing's  first  cry  was  for  disciplined  men,  trained  by  the 
methods  that  have  made  West  Point  the  finest  military 
school  in  the  world.  When  we  were  figuring  on  coming 
into  the  war,  the  Germans  did  not  fear  our  entrance  at  all. 
They  said:  "Don't  worry  about  them,  because  America 
is  a  democracy  and  a  democracy  could  never  attain  the 
standard  of  discipline  required  by  modern  war."  Well, 
their  opinion  was  well-founded,  because  the  American 
nation  would  not  accept  a  discipline  founded  on  brutish- 


TIMOTHY  M.  COUGHLAN 
Colonel,  Cavalry,  U.S..\. 


ness  and  force.  But  we  have  a  discipline  that  is  and 
should  be  superior  to  the  German  brand,  because  it 
is  founded  on  pride  and  respect. 

"To  a  great  many  outside  the  army,  the  word  dis- 
cipline stands  for  punishment.  This  interpretation  is 
simply  due  to  ignorance  and  the  general  American 
lack  of  knowledge  of  things  military,  exemplified  fre- 
quently by  the  mistaking  of  an  army  or  navy  officer  for 
a  'bellhop'  or  the  advance 
agent  of  a  circus.  The  word 
should,  however,  be  a  sign  of 
dread  to  the  lawless,  the  wilful,  the 
extravagant  and  the  corrupt. 

"The  outward  signs  of  our  dis- 
cipline are  courtesy  and  respect  from 
the  enlisted  man  toward  the  officer, 
and  from  the  officer  to  the  enlisted 
man.  If  we  are  going  to  have  proper 
discipline,  we  must  attend  to  the 
courtesies  and  customs  of  the  service, 
and  every  man  and  every  officer 
must  make  it  his  business  to  correct 
every  irregularity  that  he  finds  in  his 
travels  and  in  camp.  Considering 
the  length  of  their  service  and 
previous  experience,  both  in  mili- 
tary and  civil  life,  I  think  our 
young  officers  have  shown  a  good 
grasp  of  the  spirit  of  discipline.  As 
for  our  men,  we  feel  that  they  will 
be  there  when  the  moment  arrives, 
but  we  can't  feel  sure  unless 
they're  disciplined.  It  takes  every- 
thing a  man  has  to  go  forward  on  a 
modern  battlefield." 
Colonel  Coughlan's  previous  military  experiences  date  back 
to  1895  when  he  was  a  cadet  at  West  Point.  He 
returned  to  civil  life  in  1896,  but  the  outbreak  of  the  Span- 
ish-American war  called  him  to  the  army  again,  and  he 
served  first  as  first  sergeant  of  Company  "A"  201st  New 
York  Volunteers,  Infantry,  and  later  as  second  lieutenant 
of  the  same  regiment.  Since  that  time  he  has  not  been 
separated  from  the  service. 

He  was  commissioned  a  second  lieutenant  of  cavalry 
in  February,  1901,  and  has  since  served  in  that  branch 
of  the  service.  He  served  three  tours  of  duty  in  the 
Philippines,  the  first  tour  during  the  insurrection. 
During  his  second  tour,  1904-1906,  he  served  six 
months  in  the  field  against  the  Ladrones  in  Cavite 
Province.  He  served  in  Cuba  in  1901-02,  and  was  on 
the  Mexican  border  when  the  United  States  entered 
the  world  war. 

He  was  a  captain  in  the  First  Cavalry  when  the  war 
began,  received  his  majority  in  August,  1917,  was  pro- 
moted lieutenant-colonel  in  December  the  same  year 
and  received  his  eagles  four  days  before  the  signing 
of  the  armistice. 


18 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


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(20] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


THE  BRAIN  CENTER 

Camp  Was  City  Within  a  City,  and  Each  Functioned  Separately 


AVAST  quadrilateral  of  tents  and  barracks,  a  city 
within  a  city,  such  was  the  Cactus  Division  at  Camp 
Travis  in  its  relation  to  the  organization  of  the  camp 
proper.  The  city  of  the  camp  was  the  one  of  permanence; 
the  city  of  the  Eighteenth  Division  was  the  city  of  the 
march  and  the  field,  here  to-day,  gone  to-morrow,  at  the 
beck  of  the  War  Department.  Each  city  had  its  adminis- 
trative department  which  was  its  brain  center,  its  focus  of 
operations.  The  brain  center  of  the  camp  headquarters 
headed  the  permanent  body  military,  while  the  division 
headquarters  with  the  commanding  general  and  his  staff 
was  the  force  which  co-ordinated  all  the  activities  of  the 
divisional  organization. 

Each  of  these  organizations  functioned  alike.  Each  had 
its  separate  work  to  do  and  in  its  doing  the  whole  was  inter- 
woven so  as  to  accomplish  results  in 
the  most  harmonious  fashion.  Each 
was  a  complete  entity,  the  division 
being  so  arranged  that  it  could  move 
at  a  moment's  notice  and  re-establish 
itself  with  all  of  its  various  depart- 
ments at  its  next  temporary  abiding 
place.  The  camp  organization  was 
the  utilitarian  body  which  provided 
the  camp  conveniences  and  requi- 
sites for  whatever  division,  or  other 
military  body,  might  tenant  its  bar- 
racks or  quarters  and  at  the  same 
time  provide  for  administrative  and 
executive  functions  within  itself. 

In  its  scheme  of  organization  the 
camp  headquarters  was  responsible 
for  the  administration  of  the  Depot 
Brigade,  the  Base  Hospital,  the  Quar- 
termaster Corps,  the  Utilities,  the 
School  for  Bakers  and  Cooks,  the 
Camp  Exchange,  the  Motor  Trans- 
port Corps,  the  Ordnance  Arma- 
ment Company,  the  Ordnance 
Dep)ot,  the  Liberty  Theater,  the 
Hostess  House,  the  Remount  Station 
and  all  other  permanent  factors  of 
Camp  Travis  life.  Like  a  vast  radio  station  whose  anten- 
nae are  tuned  to  reach  out  into  every  section  to  catch  the 
sound-wave  messages  as  they  go  hither  and  yon,  so  was 
the  camp  headquarters  the  factor  which  touched  every 
human  element  of  the  cantonment,  so  that  practically 
everything  which  transpired  found  its  way,  sooner  or  later, 
through  some  of  the  channels  of  the  camp  organization 
proper.  It  had  under  its  supervision  all  of  the  millions 
in  property  and  buildings  which  the  government  provided 
as  a  training  quarters  for  the  men  who  were  designed  to 
make  up  the  divisional  units  which  were  prepared  for  for- 
eign service  in  war  time.  The  pressure  of  war  was  respon- 
sible for  the  creation  of  the  office  of  camp  executive  officer. 
When  the  War  Department  created  this  new  office.  Colo- 
nel Timothy  M.  Coughlan  was  transferred  to  it  from  the 
165th  Depot  Brigade. 

Major  James  G.  Houston,  the  assistant  divisional  ad- 
jutant of  the  Cactus  division,  was  the  first  camp  adjutant, 
serving  as  such  imtil  relieved  as  acting  adjutant  by  Cap- 
tain R.  M.  Breard,  who  was  the  immediate  predecessor 
of  Major  Clarence  A.  Short,  who  was  assigned  to  duty  as 
camp  adjutant  on  September  26, 1918,  from  Camp  Meade, 
where  he  was  the  adjutant  of  the  Twenty-second  Infantry 
brigade.  Major  Short  was  for  sixteen  years  prior  to  his 
entrance  into  the  army  the  instructor  and  professor  of 


CLARENCE  A.  SHORT 
Major,  Camp  Adjutant 


mathematics  and  engineering  at  the  Delaware  College  and 
was  a  major  and  inspector  general  on  the  Adjutant  Gen- 
eral's staff  of  Delaware  for  eight  years.  Captain  F.  M. 
Dyer,  assistant  camp  adjutant,  was  a  graduate  of  the  Leon 
Springs  officers  training  school  from  civil  life  and  had 
fifteen  years'  service  in  the  Texas  national  guard.  First 
Lieut.  G.  E.  Ewell  was  assistant  to  the  camp  adjutant. 

Major  Luther  Hoffman,  formerly  a  lawyer  of  Austin, 
Texas,  and  a  graduate  of  the  Leon  Springs  training  camp 
was  the  first  and  only  personnel  adjutant  of  Camp  Travis. 
His  assistants  were  Captain  Harry  Knight,  liaison  officer; 
Captain  Charles  A.  Martin,  a  former  Waco,  Texas  school 
teacher  who  handled  incoming  papers  and  transportation; 
Captain  Lyle  Abbott,  a  Phoenix,  Ariz.,  newspaper  man 
who  was  in  charge  of  the  vocational  assignment  section; 
Captain  William  J.  Miller,  a  CoUins- 
ville,  Texas,  newspaper  man  who  had 
charge  of  the  mustering  out  section; 
First  Lieut.  Henry  B.  Rinsland,  a 
former  teacher  in  charge  of  the  trade 
test  section  and  liaison  officer  be- 
tween the  camp  personnel  adjutant's 
department  and  the  U.  S.  Depart- 
ment of  Labor  and  Merchant 
Marine.  Captain  William  T.  Sain, 
formerly  a  Nashville,  Tennessee  lum- 
berman, had  charge  of  the  insurance 
and  allotment  section  and  Captain 
Royall  M.  Watkins,  a  Dallas  lawyer, 
was  the  camp  war  risk  judge  advo- 
cate. First  Lieut.  Rupert  W.  Fow- 
ler, Captain  David  Glickman,  Second 
Lieut.  Robert  A.  Ellison,  FirstLieut. 
Charles  A.  Wagenseller  and  Lieut. 
Cookingham  were  other  officers  of 
the  camp  personnel  adjutant's  office. 
Brigadier  General  George  H.  Estes 
was  the  commanding  general  both  of 
the  Eighteenth  Division  and  of 
Camp  Travis.  In  its  plan  of  organ- 
ization the  Cactus  Division  was  pat- 
terned after  the  system  adopted  from 
the  French  general  staff — that  of  classifying  the  work  to 
be  accomplished  into  three  groups,  imder  the  general 
direction  of  the  chief-of-  staff.  Major  John  S.  Wood  was 
the  head  of  Group  I,  the  administration  and  co-ordination 
section,  and  Captain'j^Charles  T.  Estes,  formerly  the  as- 
sistant to  the  chief-of-staff,  was  his  assistant.  Under  this 
group  came  the  offices  of  the  division  adjutant,  Lieut. 
Colonel  Laurence  W.  Redington;  Major  James  G.  Hous- 
ton, assistant  division  adjutant,  and  Captain  Robert  B. 
Hollomon,  assistant  to  the  division  adjutant.  Also  the 
division  judge  advocate.  Major  Francis  E.  McGovern, 
with  Major  James  G.  Roper,  Ids  assistant;  the  personnel 
adjutant  of  the  division.  Captain  Joseph  H.  Wilson,  with 
his  assistant.  First  Lieut.  George  W.  Glass,  and  all  the 
other  departments  of  the  "paper"  branch  of  the  army. 
Under  Group  2  which  was  the  intelligence  section, 
headed  by  Major  Frank  V.  Schneider  with  Major  Eugene 
C.  Bryan  as  assistant,  was  handled  all  the  details  of  com- 
munication and  channels  of  information.  Group  3  was 
the  operations  section  and  had  to  do  with  the  handling  of 
the  fighting  man  and  his  equipment  in  action.  In  that 
group  were  to  be  found  all  the  officers  in  charge  of  train- 
ing the  combat  units  and  the  preparation  of  the  fighting 
man  for  his  duties  on  the  field.  Major  Joseph  S. 
Leonard,  a  West  Point  graduate,  was  in  charge  of  Group  3. 


21 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 

WHAT  WE  THINK  ABOUT  THE  WAR 

Interview  With  Officers  and  Men  IVho  Fought  the  War  This  Side 

of  the  Atlantic 


22 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


Bottom  row — left  to  right 
Capt.  C.  M.  Barr 
Capt.  J.  C.  Kennedy 
Major  W.  B.  Tuttle 
Capt.  E.  S.  Armstrong 
Capt.  J.  J.  Connolly 


OFFICERS,  UTILITIES  DETACHMEXT 

Second  row — left  to  light 
2nd  Lieut.  Edward  Stokes 
2nd  Lieut.  E.  S.  .Alderman 
2nd  Lieut.  J.  J.  Garvey 
2nd  Lieut  \V.  H.  Nelson 
2nd  Lieut.  M.  L.  Diver 
2nd  Lieut.  G.  H.  Froebel 


Top  row — Left  to  right 
1st  Lieut.  J.  W.  Wysi 
1st  Lieut.  B.  C.  Dunlap 
Ist  Lieut.  F.  E.  Laramey 
1st  Lieut.  Denike 
1st  Lieut.  H.  O.  Huber 
2nd  Lieut.  J.  S.  Hogan 


NO  THRILLS-ONLY  HARD  WORK 

But  Camp  Would  Have  Been   Unpleasant  Place  Without  the 

Utilities  Outfit 


^N  utilities  organization  in  the  Army  is  essentially 
_r\  that  of  maintenance,  repair  and  minor  construction. 
Its  business  is  that  of  a  public  utility — to  render 
service — and  its  functioning  is  practically  that  of  a  muni- 
cipal government,  although  its  scope  is  much  larger. 

In  a  city  government,  each  property  owner  takes  care 
of  his  particular  property.  In  the  army,  the  Utilities 
looks  after  the  maintenance  and  repair  of  all  property, 
including  individual  barracks,  quarters,  etc.,  which  cor- 
respond to  the  individual  houses  in  a  municipality,  and  in 
addition,  this  detachment  is  responsible  for  the  efficiency 
of  all  the  safeguards  made  necessary  in  a  large  community, 
which  is  served  by  private  companies  with  water,  heat, 
light  and  sanitary  protection,  and  by  the  municipality 
itself,  with  a  fire  department.  In  addition,  too,  the  Utili- 
ties is  responsible  for  the  building  and  maintenance  of  all 
roads,  which  at  Camp  Travis  aggregate  thirty-two  miles. 

During  the  present  world  crisis,  the  Utilities  worked  full 
steam  ahead,  meeting  the  daily  emergencies,  large  and 
small,  in  addition  to  the  routine,  and  with  labor  which 
was  not  always  of  the  best.  Its  motto  is:  "Get  the  job 
in  hand  done  now,  and  keep  everything  working  along 
smoothly." 

Soon  after  the  war  between  the  United  States  and 
Germany  started,  Major  W.  B.  Tuttle,  at  that  time  on 
the  Quartermaster's  Advisory  Board  for  the  Southern 
Department,  was  called  to  Fort  Sam  Houston  and  directed 
to  assist  Major  E.  T.  Hartman,  now  Colonel  Hartman,  of 
the  357th  Infantry,  in  preparing  plans  for  the  water  supply 


of  a  cantonment  to  be  located  on  the  land  occupied  by 
Camp  Wilson. 

The  Utilities  work  at  Camp  Travis,  Te.xas,  may  be  said 
to  have  started  at  this  point.  The  construction  and  oper- 
ation of  Utilities  at  Camp  Travis  was  carried  forward 
by  the  constructing  quartermaster,  Lieutenant-Colonel 
G.  E.  Thome,  and  later  by  the  camp  quartermaster, 
Lieutenant-Colonel  K.  A.  Hoffman.  Captain  J.  J.  Con- 
ley,  at  that  time  a  civil  service  employee,  had  charge  of 
the  electric  installation  and  operation,  and  Lieutenant 
Ernest  S.  Alderman,  at  that  time  a  civil  service  employee, 
had  charge  of  the  construction  of  roads.  Under  Colonel 
Hoffman  the  nucleus  of  a  commissioned  organization  was 
formed. 

At  the  close  of  the  first  training  camp  held  at  Camp 
Stanley,  Leon  Springs,  Texas,  the  Government  asked  for 
men  to  volunteer  for  service  in  the  Quartermaster  Corps. 
No  one  volunteered  as  all  the  men  in  the  training  camp 
wished  to  enter  line  organizations.  The  commanding  of- 
ficer thereupon  stated  to  the  cadets  that  the  Government 
needed  Quartermaster  officers,  and  that  it  was  the  duty 
of  someone  to  volunteer  for  this  service,  although  an  as- 
signment to  a  line  organization  might  seem  preferable. 
Among  the  second  lieutenants  who  responded  to  the  Com- 
manding Officer's  request  were  the  present  Utilities  officers: 
Captain  E.  S.  Armstrong,  First  Lieutenant  Frank  E. 
Laramey  and  First  Lieutenant  James  W.  Wyse.  These 
three  officers  were  transferred  to  Camp  Travis  and  later  be- 
came a  part  of  the  commissioned  personnel  of  the  Utilities. 


23 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


During  the  winter  of  1917-18  the  Utilities  organization 
labored  under  great  difficulty  on  account  of  insufficient 
Ijersonnel.  Experienced  men  were  not  available  to  oper- 
ate the  heating  plants,  and,  because  of  this,  and  because 
of  structural  defects  which  resulted  from  the  rapidity  with 
which  the  camp  was  constructed,  many  of  the  heating 
plants  at  times  were  temporarily  out  of  commission. 
Additional  boiler  capacity  had  to  be  purchased  and  in- 
stalled at  the  Base  Hospital,  and  Captain  Earl  Eddleman 
and  Lieutenant  Grey,  of  the  camp  quartermaster's  organ- 
ization, were  of  great  assistance  in  expediting  the  pur- 
chase of  the  necessary  equipment.  Great  trouble  was 
experienced  with  the  water  pipes  which  froze  up  in  the 
biuldings  during  the  unusual  cold  weather  of  the  winter. 
There  were  very  few  plumbers  in  the  Utilities  service,  and 
civiUan  plumbers  could  not  be  obtained,  and  the  greatest 
difficulty  was  exf>erienced  in  making  the  necessary  repairs. 

Among  other  troubles  that  came  up  in  the  water  system 
was  the  destruction  of  fire  plugs  by  auto  trucks.  At  night 
these  plugs  were  frequently  nm  over  and  broken  off  at  the 
main;  and  between  this  and  the  freezing  up,  the  plumbing 
department  was  kept  very  busy.  In  addition  to  this  a 
great  many  of  the  fire  plugs  were  turned  the  wrong  way 
on  their  base  and  had  to  be  reversed. 

Teams  and  equipment  were  not  at  first  available  for 
road  repairs  and  practically  nothing  was  done  in  this  line 
until  Lieutenant  J.  S.  Denike  was  transferred  from  the 
Railway  Transportation  Branch  to  the  Utilities.  Lieu- 
tenant Denike  secured  teams  and  motor  transportation 
which  had  been  used  for  hauling  fuel,  and  which  became 
available  at  the  end  of  the  cold  weather.  Under  his 
direction,  gravel  was  hauled  and  the  necessary  repairs 
made  to  the  roads. 

In  July,  1918,  the  War  Department  recognized  the  need 
of  increased  persoimel  in  the  Utilities  work  and  author- 
ized the  strength  of  eleven  officers  and  409  enlisted  men. 
On  August  7th,  Major  Frank  E.  Todd  was  ordered  to 
Camp  Bowie  to  take  charge  of  the  Utilities  organization 
there,  and  on  August  8th,  Major  W.  B.  Tuttle,  who  had, 
at  the  request  of  the  Construction  Division,  resigned  the 
command  of  the  Second  Texas  Cavalry  and  entered  the 
National  Army,  arrived  and  took  command  of  the  Utili- 
ties Detachment  at  Camp  Travis.  The  new  organization 
prescribed  by  the  War  Department  was  at  once  put  into 
effect.    The  following  sections  were  created: 

1.  Administrative 

2.  Electric  light  and  power 

3.  Water  and  sewer 

4.  Buildings  and  shops 

5.  Heating 

6.  Roads 

7.  Pumping  in  Base  Hospital 

8.  Refrigeration 

9.  Fire  Department 

Requisitions  were  inunediately  put  in  for  the  author- 
ized number  of  enlisted  men  and  the  appointment  of  addi- 
tional suitable  officers  was  recommended.  The  camp  per- 
sonnel adjutant  and  his  assistants  proceeded  as  rapidly 
as  possible  with  the  transfer  of  enlisted  men  and  co-oper- 
ated fully  with  the  UtiUties  officer  in  this  work. 

New  War  Department  orders  were  received  entirely 
separating  the  UtiUties  Detachment  from  the  camp  quar- 


termaster's organization  and  separate  barracks  were  as- 
signed to  the  Utilities  men. 

In  the  creation  of  a  new  and  separate  UtiUties  Detach- 
ment, fuU  co-operation  and  great  assistance  were  obtained 
from  Major  Albert  Lobitz,  sub-depot  quartermaster,  and 
from  Captain  Frank  E.  Wheeler,  the  camp  property  of- 
ficer. The  constructing  quartermaster.  Major  F.  G. 
Chamberlain,  also  assisted  the  UtUities  officer  greatly  by 
lending  a  part  of  his  motor  transportation  when  a  suffi- 
cient number  of  trucks  were  not  available  for  the  Utilities 
service. 

Later,  the  Utilities  officer,  at  Camp  Travis,  was  directed 
to  take  charge  of  minor  construction  and  the  operation  of 
mechanical  units  at  Fort  Sam  Houston  and  Camp  Stanley, 
and  the  number  of  officers  were  increased  to  seventeen, 
and  an  enlisted  strength  to  752  was  authorized. 


The  history  of  the  UtiUties  supporting  the  fighting 
units  would  not  be  complete  without  mention  of  the  sacri- 
fice to  duty  all  of  the  Utilities  men  made,  in  foregoing 
their  opportunity  for  service  overseas.  Day  by  day  they 
heard  the  sharp  commands  to  the  Infantry,  the  dickety- 
cUck  of  feet  marching  in  unison  to  the  music  of  the  rattle 
of  their  own  equipment;  the  echoes  from  the  booming 
cannon  of  the  artillery,  dying  away  among  the  hiUs  of 
Camp  BulUs,  the  clank  of  the  scabbard  and  the  thunder 
of  steeds  as  the  cavalry  units  moved  away  on  their  man- 
euvers, the  hum  of  the  Liberty  motor  overhead,  making 
its  morning  reconnaissance;  the  balloons  hanging  station- 
ary hundreds  of  feet  overhead,  standing  Uke  silent  senti- 
nels watching  over  an  army  in  its  making — aU  this  was 
the  daily  panorama  at  Camp  Travis,  which  caUed  loudly 
for  fighting  service  with  the  men  moving  out  of  camp. 

Everywhere  the  hustle  and  movement  of  troops,  the 
bugle  calls  and  drills,  the  din  of  war  and  the  glad  tidings 
of  orders  for  overseas  service,  when  the  best  that  is  in  a 
fighting  man  responds  with  a  glad  heart  to  the  oppor- 
tunity of  service  for  his  country  and  humanity  on  the 
battlefields  of  France.  But  the  Utilities  men  had  to  do 
their  work  at  home. 

The  war  against  Germany  was  won  by  American  morale. 
Much  of  this  morale  of  the  men  who  were  trained  for  the 
line,  together  with  their  comfort  and  health,  is  due  to  this 
detachment.  How  the  UtUities  kept  the  pace  wth  the 
stupendous  and  incessant  activities  is  a  story  of  action, 
the  story  of  men  who,  eager  to  be  sent  to  the  Front,  were 
detaUed  to  buckle  down  to  drudgery  that  has  no  thrUls. 
They  wrestled  with  figures,  pored  over  charts  and  maps 
and  blueprints,  pounded  typewriters,  installed  suppUes  and 
equipment,  speeded  up  shipments,  and  eternally  continued 
to  grind  and  grind  on  the  every-day  work  that  their  more 
fortunate  brothers  might  have  their  ffing  at  glory  and 
honor. 


P^ 

R^^^ 


24 


CAMP    TRAVIS    AND    THE    WORLD    WAR 


O 

o 
H 

>^ 

S 

< 

(U 


25] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


This  Bird  had  Miiery 
in  tKt  Bacf^.      hi  is 
F&vorite  Di/Ty  M/ds 


Tills  nun  KilltrHad  Bad  Cyes, 
but- Wt-/(,  yoo  fCnow 

How  It  U.      ^ 


^F^k;  D/^«V  /F^»^ 
^0  Kill  Huns 


A  LETTER  THE  C.  O.  DIDN'T  WHITE 

Mrs.  Kelly  McNutt; 

Kingfisher,  Okla., 

My  dear  Mrs.  McNutt: — In  a  few  days  your  "gold-bricking"  soldier  mil  receive 
his  hated  discharge  and  start  on  his  long  walk  home.  He  is  returning  many  horrible  quali- 
ties of  mind  and  body;  which  he  always  possessed  and  were  further  cultivated  by  him 
in  the  military  service.  The  army  has  done  everything  it  can  for  him  to  remove  these 
malignent  qualities,  but  has  had  no  luck.     It  returns  to  you  a  hopeless  case. 

You  have  been  an  important  member  of  that  great  army  which  goes  to  make  us  all 
better  soldiers.  You  can  be  of  great  help  in  keeping  him  in  the  back  yard,  away  from  the 
saloons  where\he  belongs.  The  qualities  he  returns  will  be  of  absolutely  no  assistance  to  you 
except  in  just  having  something  around  the  house  in  case  the  dog  goes  for  a  stroll.  And 
in  your  hands  rests  the  future  Budweiser  consumption  in  the  town  of  Kingfisher. 

His  fare  and  necessary  expenses  have  been  paid  to  his  home:  he  will  receive  and 
have  spent  all  pay  due  him;  he  will  have  to  wear  the  "Same  Old  Linen"  for  at  least 
four  months,  after  which  they  will  be  fumigated  and  returned.  He  will  be  forced  to  retain 
his  government  insurance  at  the  same  low  rate  for  five  years,  for  your  sake  only.  And  I 
heartily  recommend  that  he  be  disposed  of  before  that  time  is  up. 

As  his  commanding  officer  I  am  disgusted  with  him,  he  has  not  done  his  duty  at  all. 
I,  and  his  comrades,  bid  him  go  wliere  the  moon  shines  over  the  guard  house  on  a  stormy 
night  with  great  joy  and  wish  him  every  succcess  on  his  fiery  way,  that  spot  in  every 
man's  heart  that  no  other  place  can  fill,  will  be  dtdy  appeased  if  a  number  ten  is  placed 
in  the  proper  expanse  on  his  anatomy  at  the  very  acute  psychological  moment. 

Yours  with  sympathy, 

Bullius  S.  Guernsey,  Commanding  General, 

joth  "Ivory  Plant"  Training  Army. 


Tfiii  (foof  Had  Weak  LvncSi, 
Bof  Htarincf  Him  Snore, 
-■      Yoo-d  Nt^erQ^utii  If. 


This  One  was  Deaf,  Except 
when  the-  Bufl/er  Slew 
flea  Ce.IL 


i     Q^ 


f/ 


26 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


MANY  SOLDIERS,  MANY  TYPES 

War  Made  Strange  Bunkies,  But  Army  Made   Them  All  Americans 


THE  soldiers  of  Camp  Travis  probably  didn't  differ 
much  from  those  of  other  cantonments,  but  daily 
intercourse  with  the  men  revealed  many  inter- 
esting characteristics  and  a  wide  variety  of  types.  Here 
were  to  be  found  soldiers  from  every  State  in  the  Union. 
One  was  discovered  from  far  off  Alaska,  where  he  was 
prospecting  when  the  world  war  began.  He  learned  of 
his  country's  entrance  into  the  conflict  a  year  after  the 
event,  and  hastened  back  through  miles  of  ice  and  snow 
to  be  ready  should  Uncle  Sam  need  his  services. 

The  soft  drawl  of  the  Southerner  and  the  "ah"  of  the 
typical  Yankee  were  distinguished  from  the  long  vowel 
sound  of  the  central  Northerner  from  Indiana — the  gen- 
uine Hoosier  who 
"reckons  as  how  he 
will  soon  get  his 
discharge,  as  the 
folks  need  him  back 
yonder."  His  ver- 
nacular is  different 
from  his  neighbor 
from  Ohio  who 
seems  to  des|?ise  the 
final  "g,"  as  he  says: 
"Yep,  I'm  goin' 
home  soon."  The 
Texas  boy  with  his 
"please,  sir"  inter- 
ests the  New  York 
East  Sider  who 
doesn't  understand 
the  Chesterfieldian 
traits  of  the  lanky 
ranger,  and  he  asks: 
"  Say,  guy,  where 
do  ya  get  that 
'please,  sir,'  stuff. 
'At's    all    right   for 

th'  Cap  or  Loot,   but   I   ain't   wastin'    'at   stuff  on 
ever'body." 

There  was  a  temperamental  bugler  who  loved  his  art 
and  was  a  prominent  member  of  a  mule  skinner's  outfit. 
His  comrades  said  he  "broke  his  arches  blowing  church 
calls,"  whatever  that  means  in  the  extraordinary  dic- 
tionary of  soldier  language.  Again,  always  to  the  fore 
in  love  and  war  or  anything  else  that  created  excitement, 
were  the  Irish  born  of  the  engineers.  One  day  three  of 
them  had  their  size  eleven  and  a  half  shoes  tandemed 
across  the  road.  A  lieutenant  who  was  watching  them, 
inquired:  "What's  the  matter,  Hogan,  don't  your  shoes 
fit?"  "Yes,  sir,  I  can  make  an  about  face  and  the  toes 
of  me  shoes  will  still  be  in  the  same  place."  Then  there 
was  the  stoical  Indian  who  never  had  much  to  say,  who 
did  his  best  to  learn  the  drill  and  was  especially  inter- 


IN   QUARANTINE. 

/  like  the  art  of  fighting  atid  the  roar  of  belching  guns, 
I'd  like  to  take  my  chance  at  slamming  bullets  at  the  Huns; 
There's  nothing  makes  me  gladdtr  than  to  be  right  on  the  scene, 
But  ain't  the  army  hell  and  all  when  you're  in  quarantine. 

When  I  signed  up  my  papers  (a  "rookie"  if  you  please). 
And  swore  I'd  hunt  the  Boches  down  when  I  got  over  seas, 
I  hoped  to  get  one  by  the  throat  and  vent  my  Yankee  spleen — 
But  I  can't  kill  no  Fritzes  when  I'm  stuck  in  quarantine. 

Some  sunny  day  ere  very  long  I'll  be  drifting  over  there, 
I'll  make  the  bullets  hum  and  jump  and  splatter  through  the  air; 
When'er  a  Boche  drifts  into  sight,  I'll  leap  to  my  machine, 
And  give but  what  in  'ells  the  use?  I'm  here  in  quarantine. 

Guy  C.  Cr^vpple 


ested  in  the  part  that  appealed  to  his  nature.  The  Mexi- 
can was  there  and  the  Spanish-American.  One  couldn't 
fail  to  find  the  boy  from  Chicago,  who  couldn't  see  any 
good  in  the  Texas  climate  because  it  was  too  monotonous. 
Every  city  of  Illinois,  in  his  estimation,  was  a  suburb  of 
Chi.  Then  there  was  the  Detroiter  who  believed  that  if 
it  hadn't  been  for  the  flivvers  the  war  would  still  be 
raging.    His  process  of  reasoning  is  unknown. 

The  Southern  negro  and  the  colored  man  from  the  North 
were  alike  only  in  color.  Clothes  did  make  the  man  with 
them,  and  in  uniform  they  stepped  straight  with  pride  and 
a  solemn  smile,  if  such  an  expression  is  possible  to  a  negro. 
And  how  they  loved  music!    One  of  them,  working  under 

the  watchful  eye  of 
a  white  non-com 
heard  the  Depot 
Brigade  band  play- 
ing a  "blue"  tune. 
Work  stopped  im- 
mediately, down 
went  the  shovel. 

"Corp'l,"hesaid, 
"you  can  put  me  in 
the  guard  house  if 
yo'  want  to,  but  ah 
just  must  hear  those 
■  'blues.'" 

It  is  difficult  to 
understand  the  psy- 
chology of  the  soldier 
in  the  selection  of 
bunkies.  Many  were 
teamed  with  entirely 
different  disposi- 
tions, aspirations, 
abilities,  in  fact, 
paradoxical  in  all 
ways;  yet  there 
seems  to  be  some  mysterious  attraction  or  affection 
that  draws  them  together  and  make  them  steadfast 
friends,  comrades-in-arms  in  the  true  sense  of  the  word. 
There  was  the  uneducated  lumberjack,  the  bunky 
of  the  licentiate  preacher;  the  cowboy  with  the  bank 
clerk;  the  newspaper  man  with  the  mule  skinner; 
the  lawyer  with  the  cook;  the  city  born  and  reared 
man  with  the  farmer  lad  who  had  never  been  away  from 
home  before.  Friendships  thus  formed  will  endure 
a  life- time.  In  later  years,  when  the  veterans  of  the  world's 
war  hold  their  annual  reunions,  as  they  surely  will,  there 
will  be  many  joyous  occasions  when  these  partners  meet. 
As  the  years  pass  and  time  shortens  the  spans  of  their  lives 
these  partnerships  will  develop  into  a  loving  brotherhood 
till  taps  is  blown  and  they  go  to  renew  them  in  the  great  be- 
yond, and  to  report  personally  tothe  Commander-in-Chief. 


CAMP    TRAVIS    AND    THE    WORLD    WAR 


o 


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28] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


OFFICERS— CAMP   SUPPLY  OFFICE 


Seated— Left  to  Right 
2nd  Lieut.  Charles  W.  Ardery        Major  Gilbert  H.  Goosey 
1st  Lieut.  Charles  E.  Richardson      Capt.  Frank  D.  Wheeler 
Capt.  Earl  H.  Eddleman  Capt.  Marsena  M.  Murray 

Capt.  John  W.  King  2nd  Lieut.  Paul  M.  Mohnkern 

Major  Albert  Lobitz  2nd  Lieut.  Aloysius  B.  Bradley 


Standing — Left  to  Right 
2nd  Lieut.  William  M.  Gallagher    2nd  Lieut.  Foster_H.  Bunkley 
2nd  Lieut.  George  Novich 
2nd  Lieut.  Ben  A.  Ligon 
2nd  Lieut.  George  C.  Garrison 
2nd  Lieut.  John  R.  Galbraith 


2nd  Lieut.  Oran  R.  Charlton 
2nd  Lieut.  John  Lightburn 
2nd  Lieut.  Clyde  V.  Ford 


BLOWING  PAY  CALL  FOR  AN  ARMY 

Quartermaster  Paid,  Fed  and  Equipped  175,000  Men   Including 

Two  Complete  Divisions 


IT  is  the  duty  of  the  Quartermaster  Corps  to  feed, 
clothe,  house,  equip,  transport,  and  pay  the  army. 
The  Quartermaster  Corps  at  Camp  Travis  was  or- 
ganized in  August,  1917,  under  the  supervision  of  Cap- 
tain, now  Lieutenant-Colonel  A.  A.  Hoffman,  Q.  M.  Corps. 
At  his  disjwsal  was  a  small  coterie  of  officers  and  civilians 
with  previous  quartermaster  experience,  and  such  addi- 
tional officers  as  he  might  need,  to  be  selected  from  the 
first  Officers'  Training  School  at  Leon  Springs,  Texas. 

Out  of  this  nucleus  an  organization  was  developed  that 
was  in  position  to  take  care  of  every  need  of  the  best 
equipped  soldier  in  the  world,  and  from  the  very  begin- 
ning, accurately  and  without  delay,  furnished  all  supplies 
required  for  the  large  army  of  men  that  passed  through 
Camp  Travis  on  its  way  to  the  firing  line.  The  results 
accomplished  may  be  estimated  from  the  number  of  sol- 
diers trained  and  equipped  at  this  camp — one  hundred 
and  seventy-five  thousand — including  two  complete  divi- 
sions. 

On  June  11,  1918,  Major  Albert  Lobitz,  Q.  M.  Corps, 
was  made  camp  quartermaster,  to  succeed  Lieutenant- 
Colonel  A.  A.  Hoffman.  Prior  to  that  time  Major  Lobitz 
was  personnel  officer  of  the  detachment,  and  to  his  lot 
fell  the  duty  of  selecting  a  personnel  to  handle  the  work 
of  the  quartermaster  office.  As  camp  quartermaster,  his 
was  the  hand  that  directed  the  work  of  the  entire  organi- 
zation. 

The  office  of  the  quartermaster  was  sub-divided  into 
five  main  branches,  namely:  Administration,  Finance, 
Property,  Subsistence,  and  Transportation.  In  addition 
to  these,  it  included  and  had  supervision  of  the  Conser- 


vation and  Reclamation  Division,  the  Camp  Travis  Laim- 
dry,  and  the  Liberty  Theatre. 

The  Administration  Section,  as  its  name  implies,  super- 
vised the  work  of  all  other  branches,  and  it  shares  in  the 
credit  due  each  and  every  one.  Through  the  close  co- 
operation of  its  officers  with  the  officers  in  charge  of  the 
various  other  branches,  this  section  was  directly  respon- 
sible for  the  operation  of  the  smooth  running  machine 
that  accomplished  wonders  in  the  handling  and  distribu- 
tion of  supplies  for  the  army  at  Camp  Travis. 

In  this  particular  office  originated  the  contracts  with 
the  public  service  corporations  for  services  such  as  electric 
current,  gas,  telephone,  ice,  etc.,  making  Camp  Travis  a 
true  home  for  the  soldier,  with  aU  modern  conveniences. 

The  scope  of  the  Administration  Section  included  the 
furnishing  of  a  personnel  for  the  entire  quartermaster  de- 
tachment. The  efficiency  of  the  organization  was  made 
possible  by  the  capable  and  conscientious  men  selected, 
each  according  to  his  special  training. 

Since  the  establishment  of  the  Finance  Branch,  Fimds 
to  the  amount  of  $22,500,000  were  expended  through  this 
branch.  Uncle  Sam's  huge  pay  roll  at  Camp  Travis  con- 
tained the  names  of  approximately  2,000  officers  and  32,000 
enhsted  men  per  month,  all  of  whom  received  their  pay 
promptly.  Taking  into  consideration  the  amount  of  work 
entailed  by  having  to  make  deductions  accoimt  of  allot- 
ments, insurance,  Liberty  Bond  payments,  etc.,  too  much 
praise  cannot  be  given  this  force  of  workers.  In  addition 
to  this,  more  than  3,000  vouchers  were  written  each 
month. 

With  four  warehouses  at  its  disposal,  the  Property 


29 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


'^^tirAiSiiMi 


:—  ;^:ar^>'r 


^»»^i«. 


'?! 


CAMP  LAUNDRY  EMPLOYEES 


Branch  opened  for  business.  Supplies  rolled  in  by  the 
train-load;  men  arrived  by  the  thousands.  A  system  of 
handling  these  materials  and  equipment  had  to  be  per- 
fected, and  time  was  limited.  Let  it  be  known  that  the 
Property  Branch  held  its  own. 

Out  of  the  chaos  grew  an  organization  that  was  ever 
ready  when  called  upon  to  supply  the  demands  of  the 
increasing  number  of  men.  Besides  the  permanent  per- 
sonnel of  the  camp,  two  complete  divisions  were  equipped 
with  all  the  necessary  requirements  of  a  perfect  unit. 

Millions  of  dollars  worth  of  supplies  passed  through 
this  office,  and  the  Property  Branch  controlled  a  chain  of 
eighteen  warehouses,  with  a  storage  space  of  approxi- 
mately 212,000  square  feet,  filled  with  materials  that 
would  inventory  in  excess  of  four  millions  of  dollars. 

The  Fuel  and  Forage  Office  was  under  the  supervision 
of  the  Property  Branch.  All  fuel  and  forage  used  by  the 
camp  was  supplied  through  this  Office.  In  October,  1918, 
the  coal  supply  on  hand  reached  approximately  16,000 
tons,  and  in  addition  to  this,  about  3,000  cords  of  wood 
were  in  the  yards.  More  than  1,000,000  pounds  of  coal 
have  been  issued  to  the  camp  in  one  day,  of  which  700,000 
were  delivered — to  keep  the  camp  fires  burning. 

The  important  task  of  feeding  the  army  at  Camp  Travis 
was  the  responsibility  of  the  Subsistence  Branch,  which 
commenced  with  the  arrival  of  the  first  quota  of  men, 
and  that  has  steadily  increased. 

With  one  warehouse  available,  they  soon  realized  that 
additional  space  was  necessary  to  take  care  of  the  enor- 
mous supplies  of  food  that  were  being  daily  received,  and 
consumed.    They  now  have  four  warehouses  in  operation. 

For  a  period  of  fourteen  months,  a  total  of  12,004,572 
rations  were  issued  by  the  commissary,  the  value  of  which 
was  nearly  $5,500,000. 

In  August,  1918,  an  up-to-date  refrigeration  plant  was 
added  to  the  Subsistence  Branch,  which  placed  it  in  posi- 
tion to  keep  on  hand  practically  everything  necessary  for 
a  complete  ration. 

The  chief  function  of  the  Transportation  Branch  was  to 
furnish  railway  transportation  for  all  troop  movements  in 
and  out  of  Camp  Travis,  as  well  as  handling  all  freight. 

Since  the  establishment  of  the  Transportation  Branch, 
44,131  freight  cars  have  been  handled  in  and  out  of  the 
camp;  but  the  principal  achievement  of  this  department 
was  the  manner  in  which  the  movement  of  the  Ninetieth 
Division  was  expedited. 


It  required  but  seven  days,  from  June  5  to  June  12, 
1918,  to  complete  this  work,  better  than  schedule  time. 
The  total  number  of  men  entrained  was  921  officers  and 
23,937  enlisted  men.  Fifty  passenger  trains  and  two 
freight  trains  were  needed  to  handle  the  movement  of 
this  division. 

The  Conservation  and  Reclamation  Branch  was  organ- 
ized in  the  early  part  of  1918,  and  consisted  of  the  Laundry 
and  Repair  Shop  Section.  In  June,  the  activities  of  this 
department  were  increased,  by  making  provisions  for  the 
renovation  of  shoes,  clothing,  hats,  coats,  etc.  Salvaging 
of  waste  materials  was  a  large  item,  and  produced  an  in- 
come of  approximately  $11,978.  The  clothing  repair  shop 
repaired  34,510  garments,  and  44,501  shoes  more  repaired 
by  the  shoe  repair  shop. 

The  Camp  Printing  Shop  was  under  the  supervision  of 
the  Conservation  and  Reclamation  Branch,  and  for  the 
several  months  did  all  of  the  printing  work  for  the  camp, 
as  well  as  considerable  work  for  other  camps. 

With  an  initial  investment  of  $225,000,  the  Camp  Travis 
Laundry  was  built,  and  began  operation  November  1, 
1917. 

At  that  time  it  was  under  the  supervision  of  the  Con- 
servation and  Reclamation  Branch;  after  August,  1918, 
the  Laundry  was  operated  as  a  separate  organization,  di- 
rectly under  the  supervision  of  the  Camp  Quartermaster. 

The  laundry  handled  the  work  of  officers  and  enlisted 
men  at  Camp  Travis;  Kelly  Field;  Brooks  Field;  Q.  M. 
Mechanical  Repair  Shop  No.  304;  Reclamation  Division; 
Auxiliary  Remount  No.  329;  Base  Hospital,  Camp  Travis; 
and  post  hospitals  at  Brooks  Field  and  Camp  John  Wise; 
handling  a  total  of  approximately  2,000,000  pieces  per 
month. 

In  connection  with  the  laundry  there  was  a  dry  clean- 
ing plant  for  the  cleaning  of  all  woolen  clothing,  blankets 
and  comforts,  etc.,  handling  approximately  70,000  pieces 
per  month. 

The  laundry  had  about  425  civihan  employees,  and  of 
the  300  women  employed,  the  majority  were  the  wives 
of  soldiers,  to  whom  preference  was  given.  The  average 
monthly  pay  roll  was  $25,000. 

Eighty  thousand  dollars  was  appropriated  to  cover  the 
running  e.xpenses  of  the  laundry  for  the  first  three  months. 
This  amount  was  refunded  from  the  earnings  of  the  laun- 
dry, leaving  a  substantial  cash  balance — proof  that  this 
institution  cleaned  up  in  more  respects  than  one. 


30 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


-They  Washed  2,000,000  Pieces  of  Laundry  Every  Month 


ALL  LAID  OUT  LIKE  A  REGULAR  TOWN 

Camp  Travis  Has  Regular  City  Names,  Like  ^' Foist"  and  "Thoid,"  For  Its 

Streets,  Mac  Tells  His  Pal  Mickey 


I 


]%  /|E  DEAR  MICKEY: 

I  Y  I  Just  a  few  lines  about  me  military  career.  Of 
course,  being  acrost  the  foam  on  the  Western 
Front  amidst  the  Big  Fuss  wit  dose  demons  of  der  air  fur 
the  past  8  months,  ain't  goin'  ter  make  this  very  lively 
chatter  fur  yer  listeners  ter  register. 

Annyhow,  kid,  here  goes.  This  is  sure  some  dump. 
It's  about  the  biggest  boig  that  lots  uf  me  pals  ever  threw 
their  lamps  at.  At  that,  fur  size  it  gives  anny  of  ole  Man- 
hattan's many  suboibs  some  argument  fur  size  stuff. 

Over  be  one  side  of  the  camp  is  a  boig  we  dubbed,  Frog 
Town.  Yer  kin  cop  anny  ting  frum  a  needle  and  spool  uv 
khaki  tread  to  a  2nd.  Louey's  uni,  wit  a  lot  ov  jitney  graft 
trown  in  on  der  side.  Gee  Mickey,  it  sointenly  gets  a  guy 
longin'  ter  take  a  slant  at  ole  Coney  Isle's  Bowery. 

Dis  camp  is  all  laid  out  like  a  regular  town,  asphalt 
streets,  electric  glims  and  telephones  and  our  barracks 
would  bring  blushes  uv  envy  to  a  lot  uv  tank  town  hotel 
proprietors  fur  elegance.  Got  regular  city  names  to  der 
streets,  like  Avenoo  A  and  B,  and  Foist  and  Thoid  Streets. 
Scattered  all  over  der  camp  is  a  flock  uv  K.  uv  C's.  and 
Y.  M.  C.  A.  hang  outs  fur  der  gang.  Take  it  frum  yer  old 
side  kick,  dey  sointenly  show  us  plenty  uv  speed-movies, 
prize  fights  and  dances  and  its  us  guys  wot  ain't  ever 
goin'  ter  furgit  it  either,  fur  dey  sointenly  quieted  my 
noives  manys  th'  night. 

Besides  dese  places  is  anuther  wots  got  me  number  al- 
right. It's  called  th'  Hostess  House  and  Mickey  it's  a  100 
ter  1  shot.  It's  an  orful  swell  shack,  where  all  der  skoits 
meet  dere  guys  in  khaki  and  it  always  makes  me  tink  uv 
dose  swell  millionaires'  cottages  scattered  along  Long  Island 
Sound.  Git  me,  wit  vines  and  everything  all  around  it. 
Dandy  place  to  trow  der  bull  to  yer  queen,  y'know. 
It's  run  be  th'  Y.  W.  C.  A.,  a  mob  uv  nifty  maids. 

Well  th'  foist  army  honors  I  had  slipped  ter  me  wuz 
being  elected  K.  P.  Gawd!  I  never  knew  dere  wuz  so 
many  dishes  in  th'  woild.  I  gets  in  th'  Mess  Hall  some- 
time before  daylight  and  stick  around  quite  a  few  hours  uv 
th'  night  uv  dat  same  day  before  th'  chief  squeeze  lets  me 
back  to  me  bunk  to  tear  off  me  bunk  fatigue. 


The  Mess  Sergeant  wot  runs  dis  restaurant  is  sum  hard 
boiled  egg — th'  Top  Kick  and  him  run  a  dead  heat  fur 
honors.  Right  after  mornin'  chow,  he  deals  me  a  neat 
car-load  uv  Moiphys  ter  peel.  So  me  and  anuther  guy,  a 
bankers  son,  at  that,  put  dis  drill  on  until  about  10:30 
A.M.  The  banker's  son  is  handed  a  new  job,  scrubbing 
th'  Mess  Hall  floors  and  tables,  while  I  draws  a  young 
forest  of  timber  which  I  try  vainly  ter  reduce  to  kindlin' 
wood.  Th'  Mess  Sergt  finally  peeps  at  me  pile  after 
which  I  get  time  to  slip  th'  nose  bag  on  and  trow  me 
feet  under  th'  table  fur  noon  chow  wid  th'  rest  uv  th' 
gang. 

Yer  should  hav  been  givin'  me  th'  oncet  over  th'  other 
day  while  on  foot  drill.  Me  Captain  slips  me  a  squad  ter 
drill.  Fine!!l  I  takes  'em  fur  a  ramble  aroun'  the  parade 
ground,  marching  ahead  uv  me  squad,  head  way  up  in 
the  air,  chin  well  up,  when  I  give  'em  "SQUADS  LEFT" 
and  being  so  fussed  up  wit  pride  fur  me  squad  I  toins 
Right  and  don't  get  ne.xt  to  me  bull  until  I  slip  the  squad 
anuther  command,  TO  THE  REAR— MARCH.  Dere 
wuz  me  gang  over  be  th'  other  end  uv  th'  parade  ground 
doin'  der  bast  to  climb  over  der  barracks.  Nix  on  der 
officer  stuff  fer  mine  Mickey.  Giv  me  buck  private  in 
der  rear.  Did  I  make  a  hit  wit  der  Captain?  Ast  me? 
I  draws  K.  P.  fur  tree  Sundays  in  succession. 

It's  a  good  ting  fur  you  pal,  that  you  don't  have  any 
guard  duty.  You  start  in  one  afternoon  and  wind  up  th' 
next.  Two  hours  walking  post  and  four  sleeping,  maybe. 
Annyhow,  while  hanging  around  th'  guard  house  the  Com- 
mander of  the  Guard  put  us  over  the  jumps  on  our  General 
Orders.  Y'know  number  eleven — "To  salute  all  officers, 
all  Colors  and  standards  not  cased."  Well  the  officer  asts 
us,  "Wot  der  yer  mean,  by  'cased'?"  Up  pops  a  mug  full 
of  info,  and  sezs,  "When  he  is  ridin'  in  an  automobile." 
No  wonder  we  have  woild  wars,  hey  kiddo? 

Well  dear  old  pal,  I'll  have  to  chop  me  moans  fur  awhile. 
Slip  us  some  dope  on  yer  air  bold  pals  over  there.  Best 
o'luck. 

Yours 

MAC." 


31] 


CAMP    TRAVIS     AND    THE    WORLD    WAR 


[32] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


RIGHT  MAN  IN  THE  RIGHT  PLACE 

Personnel  Officer  Put  Round  Pegs  in  Round  Holes  and  Invented 

the  Bull  Pen 


THE  right  man  in  the  right  place  was  the  aim  of  all 
personnel  work  in  the  army. 
The  necessity  for  personnel  work  is  found  in  the 
fact  that  the  civil  experience  of  soldiers  had  to  be  utilized 
to  the  greatest  possible  extent  in  the  army.  In  this 
manner  the  necessity  for  educating  men  in  the  various 
lines  of  military  work  after  they  were  inducted,  was 
avoided.  Full  advantage  was  taken  of  their  training  in 
civil  life,  and  thus  much  lost  time  and  motion  was  saved. 

The  personnel  work,  in  its  present  scope,  was  organized 
by  Major  Luther  Hoffman,  Adjutant  General's  Depart- 
ment, U.  S.  Army.  It  found  its  beginning,  however,  in 
the  fall  of  1917.  In  the  early  days  an  effort  was  made  by 
the  personnel  officer  to  ascertain  the  trades  and  professions 
and  their  skill  and  proficiency  therein  of  all  enlisted  men 
then  at  Camp  Travis.  With  this 
index  before  him  the  personnel 
officer  was  able  in  a  measure  to  sup- 
ply the  needs  of  various  units  then 
stationed  in  camp. 

In  June,  1918,  the  personnel 
office  and  the  personnel  work  were 
completely  reorganized,  and  a  very 
large  volume  of  work  not  theretofore 
attempted  to  be  done  by  the  per- 
sonnel officer  was  taken  over.  The 
office  was  divided  into  various  sec- 
tions, as  follows:  Receiving  Section, 
Mustering  Section,  Insurance  and 
Allotment  Section,  Vocational  and 
Assignment  Section,  Information 
Section,  Shipping  Section,  Trans- 
portation Section,  Discharge  Sec- 
tion and  Trade  Test  Section. 

Each  of  these  sections  of  the  per- 
sonnel office  had  its  particular  work 
cut  out  for  it  in  such  manner  that 
there  was  no  overlapping  of  duties 
performed  by  the  various  sections, 
and  when  one  section  had  completed 
its  particular  duty  pertaining  to  the 
recruit,  the  responsibility  of  that 
particular  section  ceased,  and  the  responsibility  of  the  next 
succeeding  section  began.  For  instance,  the  Receiving 
Section  was  charged  with  the  duty  of  meeting  the  arriving 
increments  of  inducted  men  at  the  railway  stations,  con- 
ducting them  to  temporary  quarters  in  camp,  making  a 
proper  check  of  the  number  of  men  arriving  from  each 
local  board,  the  local  board  forms  brought  into  camp  by 
each  increment,  and  generally  looking  after  the  comfort 
and  welfare  of  the  new  arrivals.  The  Receiving  Section, 
upon  orders,  turned  the  recruits  over  to  the  Mustering 
Section,  the  responsibility  of  the  Receiving  Section  there- 
upon ceasing,  and  that  of  the  Mustering  Section  beginning, 
and  so  on  through  all  of  the  processes  necessary  to  absorb 
the  recruits  into  the  army. 

The  Mustering  Section  was  charged  with  the  duty  of 
accomplishing  the  local  board  forms,  the  execution  of  the 
service  records,  pay  cards,  and  the  keeping  of  proper  ac- 
counts with  the  local  boards  and  the  Provost  Marshal 
General.  The  Insurance  and  Allotment  Section  cared  for 
all  Insurance  and  Allotment  Applications,  Claims  for 
Exemption  from  Compulsory  Allotments,  Delayed  Allot- 
ments, etc.  The  Information  Section  kept  a  card  index, 
corrected  daily,  of  all  officers  and  men  in  camp,  showing 
their  duty  and  status. 


MAJOR  LUTHER  HOFFMAN 
Camp  Personnel  Officer 


One  of  the  most  responsible  and  important  sections  of 
the  personnel  office  was  that  concerned  with  the  vocational 
assignment  of  soldiers.  It  was  the  duty  of  this  section  to 
see  that  full  advantage  was  taken  of  the  civil  experience 
and  training  of  the  soldier,  and  that  he  was  placed  in  the 
army  in  such  position  that  the  full  benefit  might  be  had 
by  the  Government  of  this  civil  experience  and  training. 

In  order  to  accomplish  this  the  Vocational  Assignment 
Section  maintained  a  card  for  each  soldier,  which  contained 
a  complete  history  of  the  man,  and  showed  in  detail  his 
civil  experience  and  his  degree  of  proficiency  therein.  By 
mechanical  indexes  all  of  this  information  was  available 
for  instant  use.  In  the  preparation  of  these  cards,  called 
soldier's  qualification  cards,  a  large  board  consisting  of 
approximately  fifty  men,  who  were  expert  in  examining  re- 
cruits for  their  civil  experience,  was 
maintained.  These  expert  examiners 
interviewed  in  person  every  recruit 
arriving  at  Camp  Travis,  and  filled 
out  a  soldier's  qualification  card  for 
him. 

In  addition  to  the  files  in  which 
were  kept  the  soldier's  quahfication 
cards,  a  group  of  approximately 
forty  men  classified  all  of  such  cards 
as  were  accomplished  by  the  Exam- 
ining Board,  and  picked  out  from 
the  information  contained  on  these 
cards,  under  the  direction  of  the  per- 
sonnel adjutant  and  his  assistants, 
soldiers  who  were  needed  for  such 
military  duty  as  their  civil  experi- 
ence best  qualified  them.  In  this 
manner  there  was  not  only  a  card 
index  for  all  soldiers  in  camp  but  a 
card  index  for  the  qualifications  of 
all  such  soldiers.  The  same  section  of 
the  personnel  office  maintained  a  file 
of  qualification  cards  for  officers,  and 
assignment  was  of  officers  made  in  a 
large  measure  from  the  information 
gleaned  from  the  qualification  cards. 
The  Shipping  Section  concerned  itself  with  the  prepara- 
tion of  men  for  shipment  out  of  camp,  such  as  their  final 
medical  examination,  the  inspection  of  their  military 
records,  and  such  other  matters  as  pertained  to  the  de- 
parture of  the  men.  The  Transportation  Section  was 
charged  with  the  duty  of  securing  railway  transportation. 
The  Discharge  Section  accomplished  the  payment  and 
discharge  of  men  who  were  rejected  by  the  medical 
examiners. 

The  Trade  Test  Section  was  designed  to  require  a  prac- 
ticable demonstration  of  what  the  soldier  claimed  he  could 
do  in  a  large  number  of  mechanical  lines  which  are  essential 
in  the  army.  Upon  the  arrival  of  the  soldier  in  camp 
there  was  ffiled  out  for  him  a  soldier's  qualification  card, 
and  his  statement  of  what  he  could  do  and  how  well  he 
could  do  it  was  placed  on  this  card.  In  the  Trade  Test 
Section  the  soldier  was  required  to  show  by  actual  per- 
formance whether  or  not  he  could  live  up  to  his  own 
statement  of  his  experience  and  ability.  In  this  manner 
not  only  did  the  army  have  the  advantage  of  the  soldier's 
own  statement  of  his  qualifications,  but  an  accurate  test 
was  made  of  them,  and  the  possibiUty  of  placing  a  man  in  a 
responsible  position  that  he  was  unable  to  fill,  was  avoided. 
Another  interesting  phase  of  the  personnel  work  was 


33 


CAMP    TRAVIS     AND    THE     WORLD    WAR 


VICTORY  FEET 


that  carried  on  at  the  recruit  examination  building.  The 
recruit  entered  this  building  in  his  civilian  attire,  and 
armed  only  with  his  local  board  forms.  He  was  disrobed, 
given  a  bath,  his  physical  examination  was  completed,  all 
of  his  military  records  were  accomplished;  he  was  com- 
pletely clothed  and  outfitted,  and  assigned  to  his  per- 
manent organization  in  the  space  of  an  hour.  By  con- 
centrating all  of  the  work  which  related  to  absorbing  a 
soldier  into  the  army,  at  a  central  point,  a  very  large 
amount  of  lost  time  and  motion  was  saved.  Between 
fifteen  and  eighteen  hundred  men  could  be  taken  care  of 
in  a  day's  work  of  six  and  one-half  hours.  All  of  the  men 
who  were  found  physically  deficient  or  incapable  of  mih- 
tary  duty  were  paid  off,  discharged,  and  started  back  to 
their  homes  within  a  few  hours  after  reaching  camp. 

Under  the  method  of  receiving  recruits,  in  operation 
prior  to  the  adoption  by  the  present  personnel  office  of 
this  plan  of  absorbing  men  into  the  army,  men  who  were 
to  be  discharged  were  retained  in  the  camp  for  weeks  and 
sometimes  months  before  they  could  finally  be  paid  off 
and  returned  to  their  homes.  Furthermore,  it  was  found 
by  immediately  examining  and  equipping  recruits,  they 
were  much  more  contented,  and  went  into  the  orders  and 
habits  of  a  soldier  much  more  rapidly  than  formerly. 
Hence,  the  new  plan  not  only  saved  a  great  deal  of  lost 
time  and  money,  but  had  a  direct  bearing  upwn  morale. 

It  is  interesting  to  note  that  at  the  conference  of  the 
personnel  adjutants  in  Washington,  the  essential  features 


of  the  method  of  receiving  recruits  in  vogue  at  Camp 
Travis  were  adopted  for  all  camps,  and  this  system  was 
under  process  of  being  installed  in  all  of  the  larger  camps 
and  cantonments  at  the  time  the  armistice  was  signed. 

The  Personnel  Ofiice  at  Camp  Travis  at  one  time  and 
another  maintained  various  schools  for  the  training  of 
enlisted  men  as  stenographers,  company  clerks,  etc.  g|It 
was  frequently  found  that  soldiers  had  had  some  experience 
as  typists  and  stenographers,  but  for  one  reason  or  another 
had  given  up  this  work.  By  placing  such  men  in  schools 
and  giving  them  a  short  intensive  course,  this  latent  ability 
was  revived,  and  used  in  behalf  of  the  army.  A  school  of 
the  Personnel  Office  itself  was  maintained  continuously, 
in  which  enlisted  men  were  taught  the  various  phases  of 
personnel  work,  and  were  utilized  when  and  where  needed. 
In  this  manner  Camp  Travis  has  furnished  a  number  of 
skilled  personnel  men  to  other  camps. 

At  Camp  Travis  the  enUsted  men  in  the  Personnel  Office 
were  organized  into  a  detachment,  called  the  Personnel  De- 
tachment. This  detachment  had  its  own  quarters  and  its 
own  mess,  held  frequent  dances  and  other  social  gatherings, 
and  in  this  manner  built  up  an  esprit  de  corps  second  to  none. 

After  the  signing  of  the  armistice  no  other  draft  incre- 
ments were  received  in  camp,  and  the  machinery  developed 
by  the  personnel  adjutant  and  his  assistants  was  converted 
to  the  use  of  discharging  officers  and  enlisted  men,  and 
instead  of  converting  civilians  into  soldiers,  it  converted 
soldiers  into  civilians. 


[34] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


REGGIE  TOURS  THE  BULL  PEN 


'his  selective  service  law  certainly  selected  some 
rare  specimens  for  the  life  militaire,"  said  the 
sergeant,  as  he  lighted  his  Swamp  Root  cigarette 
and  deposited  his  shoes,  field  service,  size  11>2,  on  his 
bunkie's  blanket.  "Yes,  sir,  some  queer  birds  blew  into 
this  here  army  by  the  'bull  pen'  route.  I  am  reminded 
of  one  in  particular,  one  of  those  Reggies  one  sees  very 
effectively  tailored  to  cater  to  the  feminine  trade  back 
home  in  our  best  department  stores.  You  get  me — 
one   of  those    lingerie    salesmen. 

"This  same  Reggie  blew  into 
camp  with  a  regular  line  of  cus- 
tom tailored  habiliments,  a  nifty 
sartorial  creation  of  the  gayest 
Newport  flannels  that  have  never 
got  nearer  Newport  than  Brighton 
Beach;  a  Knox  sailor,  silk  shirt 
of  rarest  tints,  a  delicate  cerise 
result  in  neckwear,  with  hose  to 
match,  and  footwear  that  would 
agonize  the  average  male  foot 
even  to  stand  beside. 

"Well,  this  rugged  candidate 
for  the  shock  troops,  after  a  night 
o  f  somnambulistic  imaginings 
only  possible  after  a  first  night 
in  an  army  bunk,  was  ordered  to 
report  at  seven  bells  next  morn- 
ing at  the  bull  pen,  in  company 
with  several  hundred  of  us  who 
had  come  in  on  the  same  train. 

"Reggie  got  his  first  shock 
when  we  were  ordered  to  peel 
off.  He  was  a  bit  reluctant  at 
first,  until  a  rather  rough  speci- 
men of  sergeant  from  the  pill 
roller  battalion  got  after  him. 
'Peel  'em  off,  kid,'  says  the 
sergeant.  'You're  perfectly  safe, 
around  here.'    And    Reggie   peels, 


nothin'  but  men 
blushing  furiously, 
and  slips  into  line  with  the  rest  of  the  boys. 

"The  first  thing  he  encountered  was  a  thorough  exam- 
ination to  determine  if  he  had  always  led  a  circumspect 
social  life,  which  he  passed  instanter,  being  handed  a 
towel  and  a  portion  of  perfumeless  soap  with  directions 
to  take  a  bath.  This  diversion  bucked  him  up  consider- 
able, for  he  edged  a  Texas  cowpuncher  out  of  line  in  his 
scramble  to  get  to  the  tubercular  test.  They  slowed  him 
up  here,  for  the  most  violent  exercise  he  had  taken  in  the 
past  few  years  was  taking  inventory  or  perhaps  standing 
in  line  at  some  of  the  better  class  of  movie  theatres. 

"  But  the  lieutenant  finally  passed  him  on  with  the  rest 
of  us  to  take  the  jumps  as  ordered  by  the  neuro-psychi- 
atric  exams.    The  T.B.  test  had  been  too  much  for  Reggie, 


it  seems,  for  when  the  examiners  quizzed  him  regarding 
nervous  exhaustion,  fainting  spells,  heart  palpitations,  he 
just  blushed  frightfully  and  could  only  articulate  in  faint 
and  girlish  whispers.  However,  they  sped  him  on  even- 
tually to  the  paddock  to  be  weighed  in.  Imagine,  if  you 
can,  sixty  inches  in  altitude,  hitting  the  beam  for  103 
pounds,  a  chest  expansion  of  an  inch  and  a  half,  and  a 
major-general's  monthly  pay  check  invested  in  gold  molars 
and  bicuspids.  Reggie  must  of  been  a  perfect  wretch 
for  Huyler's  creamy  bonbons. 
"Ever  onward  in  our  journey, 
we  next  find  him  before  the  ortho- 
pedic expert.  Reggie's  'dogs' 
were  just  fair,  and  he  got  a  good 
bawling  out  from  the  lieut.  for 
pinching  'em  in  his  stylish  point- 
ed Regals.  In  our  next  chapter 
we  see  him  being  tested  for  strains, 
but  as  Reggie's  severest  physical 
labor  had  been  showing  elaborate 
ruffled  stuff  to  fair  maidens,  he 
just  flew  through. 

"  Then  a  rough  non-com  grabbed 
his  dainty  mitts  and  placed  them 
on  an  old  nasty  board  all  glutted  up 
with  mucky  ink,  and  got  his  finger 
prints.  And  did  I  say  anything 
about  the  tortoise  shell  glasses 
he  was  wearing?  No,  well  he  had 
'em  on,  big  as  searchlights;  and 
what  did  the  horrid  old  examiners 
do  but  give  20/20  in  both  orbs. 
Well,  he  passed  the  heart  specialists 
with  a  few  girl's  throbs  of  excite- 
ment and  that  concluded  the  trip. 
He  was  O.  K.  and  ready  for  his  O.D. 
"Horrors!  Horrors!  His  uni- 
form nearly  broke  his  heart.  'Oh, 
geranium,' says  he,  'how  can  lever  sleep  in  those  nasty 
damp  trenches  with  such  rough  materials  chafing  me.  And 
those  horrid  shoes — I  can  almost  pack  my  wardrobe  in 
them.  Not  breathing  a  word  about  my  O.  D.  uniform;  but 
honest,  the  breeches  were  designed  for  some  creature 
about  eight  feet  high,  and  I  can't  button  my  shirt  and 
blouse.  My  hat  size  is  S^g  and  I  drew  a  7}{.  Goodness 
sakes.  Oh,  hell,  I  don't  care.  I'm  a  soldier  now,  but  I'm 
just  frothing  I'm  that  angry.  I  could  just  strike  that 
Crown  Prince  so  he'd  feel  it.' 

"And  so  another  member  of  our  invincible  army  was 
recorded  in  the  archives  of  the  War  Department.  What 
became  of  Reggie?  Well,  the  last  I  heard  of  that  swash- 
buckling Hun-killer,  he  was  getting  intensive  training  in 
that  important  branch  of  the  service  which  is  taught  at 
the  School  for  Cooks  and  Bakers." 


BobOodW 

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[35: 


CAMP    TRA\IS     AND    THE     WORLD    WAR 


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leo.  Dorsetl 
enri  Letord 
C.  W.  Wells 
B.  Matz 
J.  Gates 
R.  Bready 
S.  Moore 
P.  Pilling 

B.  Stokes 
L.  Power 
W.  White 

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i 

.   Capt.  H.  N.  Lutman 
.   Capt.  H.  G.  Walcott 
.   Capt.  R.  C.  Early 
.   Capt.  G.  S.  Milnes 
.   Capt.  A.  B.  Middleton 
.    Capt.  G.  C.  Lyons 
.   Capt.  S.  H.  Leopold 
.   Capt.  Q.  J.  Barker 
.   Capt.  W.  H.  Guy 
).    Major  R.  K.  Cole 
.    Major  L.  A.  Grcensfelder 
!.    Col.  LW.  Rand 
.   Major  J.  M.  Mayhew 

"INCCJ-iCtCt-XOSO  —  MCO 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


THEY  FOUGHT  THE  FLU  AND  WON 

Trench  Warfare  Sounds  Like  Pink   Tea  to  Medical  Men  of  the 

Base  Hospital 


WE  have  fought  the  flu  from  every  angle;  chased  land 
subs;  rolled  pills,  administered  the  inevitable 
Epsom  and  picked  rocks  and  cactus  spines  until 
the  horrors  of  trench  warfare  sound  to  us  like  a  pink  tea 
given  by  the  Ladies'  Social  and  Literary  Clubs  of  Hohokus. 
We  have  tired  of  jobs  and  tired  again;  but  through  it  all 
we  have  manned  the  old  boat  and  steered  her  through 
epidemic  and  quarantine,  hoping  that  as  a  reward  for  our 
service  we  might  some  day  be  retired. 

Unselfish  and  sacrificing  service  of  an  invaluable  nature 
has  been  performed  by  the  medical  men 
and  their  assistants,  many  of  whom  left 
important  posts  in  civil  life  to  take  up 
the  army  grind  and  contribute  their 
share  to  the  winning  of  the  war.  In  the 
heart  of  every  soldier  and  officer  of  the 
camp  there  is  a  recognition  of  this  ser- 
vice, recognition  succinctly  expressed  in 
the  following  communcation  from  Briga- 
dier General  George  H.  Estes  to  Colonel 
Irving  W.  Rand,  Medical  Corps,  U.  S. 
A.,  commanding  officer  of  the  Base  Hos- 
pital: 

"The  epidemic  of  influenza  has  passed, 
and  at  this  time  I  wish  to  express  to  you 
jjersonally,  and  through  you,  to  the 
Medical  personnel,  including  officers, 
nurses  and  enlisted  men,  engaged  with 
you  in  combating  this  terrible  disease, 
the  thorough  and  earnest  appreciation 
and  gratitude  of  every  officer  and  man  in 
this  camp  for  the  services  rendered.  The 
unflagging  devotion  to  duty  and  the  will- 
ingness to  work  without  regard  to  hours 
or  personal  comfort,  deserves  the  highest 
praise,  and  the  result,  as  shown  in  the 
low  mortality  rate,  is  the  real  testimon- 
ial to  the  character  of  the  service  ren- 
dered, and  should  be  a  source  of  gratifica- 
tion and  pride  to  you  as  it  is  to  us." 

When  the  Government  decided  to  bring 
troops  for  training  to  San  Antonio,  and 
to  establish  Camp  Travis,  due  considera- 
tion was  given  the  plan  of  enlarging  Base 
Hospital  No.  1  at  Fort  Sam  Houston.  It 
was  finally  decided  to  build  a  separate 
hospital    to   care   for   patients    at    Camp    Travis. 

Authority  was  given  August  22,  1917,  to  build,  and  at 
once  the  ground  was  made  ready  and  the  next  day  the 
carpenters  started  to  work.  They  fairly  swarmed  over 
the  place  and  the  building  resembled  that  of  a  western 
dty  springing  up  in  a  single  night.  Whole  side  walls 
were  put  in  place  at  one  time.  Another  large  force  was 
engaged  in  building  roads,  laying  water  mains  and  sewers. 

Before  the  hospital  quarters  could  be  completed,  owing 
to  congested  conditions  at  Base  Hospital  No.  1,  Fort  Sam 
Houston,  the  Base  Hospital  at  Camp  Travis  opened  for 
patients  November  9,  1917,  using  barracks  on  Sixth  and 
F  Streets.  By  November  21,  1917,  enough  building  were 
completed  so  that  the  Hospital  proper  was  opened  at 
Fourteenth  and  A  Streets  with  Major  William  H.  Smith, 
M.  C,  commanding. 

The  buildings  are  of  the  so-called  cottage  plan  and  ar- 
ranged so  as  to  be  of  easy  access  by  covered  galleries. 
The  hospital  has  one  of  the  most  pleasing  locations  fxjs- 


COL.  IRVING   W.  RAND 
Commanding  Base  Hospital 


sible,  being  situated  on  a  hill  with  a  beautiful  view  of  San 
.\ntonio. 

During  December,  1917.  a  pneumonia  epidemic  pre- 
vailed in  the  camp  and  taxed  the  hospital  to  capacity. 

Colonel  Irving  W.  Rand,  M.  C,  reported  as  commanding 
officer  January  26,  1918,  relieving  Major  William  H. 
Smith,  who  went  to  Asheville,  North  Carolina.  In  con- 
C|uering  the  first  camp  epidemic  Colonel  Rand  gave  the 
benefit  of  his  vast  experience  and  an  administration  of 
efiiciency  and  justice  which  could  not  but  fail  to  inspire 
confidence  and  respect.  Among  the 
medical  officers  assigned  to  duty  were 
Major  Louis  A.  Greensfelder,  chief  of 
surgery;  Major  J.  H.  Mayhew,  chief  of 
medical  service;  Major  Theo.  Dorsett, 
chief  of  eye,  ear,  nose  and  throat  cUnic; 
Captain  Philip  B.  Matz,  chief  of  labora- 
tory; Lieut.  R.  C.  Baumgarten,  chief  of 
X-Ray  laboratory  and  Captain  William 
H.  Guy,  chief  of  genito-urinary  and  skin 
diseases.  Lieut.  Barney  W.  Fields,  quar- 
termaster detachment  commander,  and 
his  co-workers  of  the  Base  Hospital, 
furnished  quartermaster  supplies,  attend- 
ed to  all  minor  repairs  and  furnished 
transportation.  His  office  was  taxed  to 
its  fullest  capacity  during  the  influenza 
epidemic  and  when  anything  was  needed 
Lieutant  Herrin  would  say:  "Go  to  the 
phone  and  call  Fields." 

Major  Marshall,  chief  of  dental  surg- 
ery, and  his  staff  relieved  the  boys  from 
many  aches,  and  it  has  been  a  source  of 
satisfaction  to  have  them  connected  with 
the  hospital. 

Along  with  the  organization  of  a  Base 
Hospital  came  the  need  of  corps  men 
and  Major  R.  K.  Cole  was  placed  as 
commander  of  the  detachment.  The 
original  personnel  has  undergone  many 
changes  by  additions  from  Fort  Riley, 
Camp  Greenleaf,  and  the  source  of  ma- 
terial for  all  branches — the  16oth  Depot 
Brigade.  By  subtraction  were  sent  out 
three  different  units:  one  a  replacement 
unit,  another  to  form  a  hospital  unit  for 
oversea  service,  and  the  last  one  to  leave  the  Base  Hos- 
pital No.  150,  which  departed  on  the  morning  of 
November  11 — in  time  to  have  one  meal  in  their 
new  quarters  before  the  armistice  was  signed.  This 
last  organization  has  been  scattered  since  leaving  us; 
sixty-five  were  returned,  one  hundred  were  sent  to 
Fort  Bayard,  New  Mexico,  while  the  remaining  Non- 
coms,  Non-coms-elect  with  a  few  cooks  and  K.  P.'s  are 
iuvaiting  their  return  trip  through  the  "bull  pen"  prior  to 
their  discharge. 

February,  1918,  found  Camp  Travis  in  the  throes  of  a 
measles  and  mumps  epidemic,  which  was  handled  with 
credit  to  the  hospital.  During  the  spring  and  summer  of 
1918,  in  addition  to  caring  for  the  acute  sickness,  the  hos- 
pital was  devoted  to  repairing  disabled  men,  making  them 
fit  for  army  service. 

The  influenza  epidemic  which  swept  throughout  the 
United  States,  visited  this  camp  in  October,  1918,  and  the 
Base  Hospital  personnel,  increased  to  include  all  the  doc- 


37 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


tors  and  nurses  available,  with  assignments  of  enlisted 
men  from  the  165th  Depot  Brigade,  worked  day  and  night 
in  combating  the 
rapidly  increasing 
disease,  which  in 
many  cases  devel- 
oped into  pneu- 
monia, increasing 
the  burden  to  the 
proportion  of  a 
double  epidemic. 

Insufficient  hos- 
pital capacity  hav- 
ing been  anticipat- 
ed, company 
barracks  at  Third 
and  F  Streets  were 
converted  into 
temp)orary  wards 
and  during  the  epi- 
demic seventy-six 
of  these  double 
story  buildings 
were  used.  The 
percentage  of 
mortality    was 


very  low,  a  source  of    gratification 
During    its    history,    the    Basej 


OVERSEAS  WARD 
Men  in  this  ward  were  wounded  in  action  in  France 


to  all  concerned. 
Hospital  at  Camp 
Travis  has  treat- 
ed more  than 
fifty  thousand  pa- 
tients and  in  ad- 
dition to  caring 
for  the  sick  of 
the  camp,  is 
represented  across 
the  seas  by  groups 
of  officers,  nurses 
and  enUsted  men 
who  received  their 
training  here.  Af- 
ter the  armistice 
was  signed  the 
hospital  was  re- 
organized for  re- 
construction work 
and  the  first 
soldiers  wounded 
in  action  in 
France  were  ad- 
mitted [December 
6,  1918. 


THE  BLOOM  OF  THE  CACTUS 

Imagine  Camp   Travis,  or  a  War,   Without  a  Corps  of  Nurses! 


As  the  Eighteenth  Di\'ision  took  its  formation  for  its 
symbol,  the  cactus,  the  blossoms  of  the  plant  were 
formed  by  the  nurses  of  the  Base  Hospital.  Grace 
and  symmetry  were  thus  added,  and  a  cluster  of  buds  grew 
among  the  bayonets,  which  simulated  the  spines  of  the 
prickly  pear.  Beauty  and  colorful  effect  was  given  to  the 
picture  through  the  combination  of  the  blue  and  red 
against  the  dull  white  of  the  nurse's  uniform,  and  the  whole 
typified  the  utilitarian  purposes  of  the  women  whose  noble 
work  has  formed  one  of  the  outstanding  factors  in  the 
world  war. 

No  narrative  of  the  work  at  Camp  Travis  would  be  com- 
plete without  more  than  passing  mention  of  the  nurses 
corps,  the  company  which,  though  small,  has  contributed 
so  much  to  the  comfort,  welfare  and  health  of  the  men  in 
uniform.  And  a  prominent  mention  should  be  made  of 
the  eighty-five  courageous  women  who  went  from  Camp 
Tra\ds  Base  Hospital  to  the  Western  front  to  do  their 
part  towards  alle- 
\iating  suffering  of 
the  wounded  and 
djdng  and  to  brave 
the  terrors  of  im- 
pending iU  from 
earth,  sea  and  sky. 
The  men  and  offi- 
cers of  the  heroic 
Ninetieth  did  no 
little  towards  add- 
ing brilUancy  to  the 
record  of  our  tri- 
umph over  there, 
and  their  part  was 
duplicated  in  the 
service  of  the  nurses ' 
corps  which  left 
with  the  division. 

The  first  nurses 
to  report  for  duty  at 


Camp  Travis  were  three  who  took  their  stations  at  the 
uncompleted  Base  Hospital  buildings  on  November  30, 
1917.  Twenty-six  others  followed  within  a  few  days  in 
charge  of  Miss  Amelia  Goodine,  as  chief  nurse,  and  on 
January  1  twenty  others  were  transferred  from  Fort  Sam 
Houston  hospital  to  Camp  Travis.  At  that  time  there 
were  but  thirty-five  wards,  with  an  average  of  thirty-six 
patients  to  the  ward,  and  corps  men  nursed  the  patients. 
With  the  coming  of  the  nurses,  the  wards  were  transformed 
from  their  crude  state  by  the  gentle  touch  and  the  kindly 
word,  and  were  beautified  and  made  homelike,  so  that  the 
soldier  when  iU  would  not  disUke  to  enter  them. 

As  the  camp  grew,  the  Base  Hospital  increased  propor- 
tionately and  the  roll  of  nurses  increased,  so  that  by  April 
there  were  one  hundred  and  twenty  nurses  and  forty 
wards.  On  April  16,  Miss  Goodine,  the  chief  nurse,  was 
called  overseas  and  Miss  CaroUne  Geiken  promoted  to  her 
station.  Thus  the  nurse  p)ersonnel  was  constantly  chang- 
ing as  small  details 
were  sent  to  France 
and  others  took 
their  places.  In 
November,  1918, 
the  hospital  had 
an  average  of  one 
hundred  and  sixty 
nurses  and  fifty- 
eight  wards  with 
nurses  in  ch^^  rge, 
and  the  nurses' 
quarters  had  been 
increased  from  one 
building  to  two 
large  buildings  and 
four  barracks,  al 
buildings  being 
steam  heated  and 
each  nurse  having 
her 'own  room. 


38 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 

SPEAKING  OF  UNIFORM  CHANGES 

If  the  U.  S.  Adopts  That  Coat  of  Many  Colors  the  Old  Line 

Sergeant  Will  Be  Peeved 


THE  Major  had  just  signalled  "rest"  to  his  battalion 
on  the  field  when  an  overseas  sergeant  and  an  old 
line  sergeant  in  one  of  the  companies  strolled  over 
to  the  edge  of  the  parade  for  a  smoke.  Just  as  the  old- 
timer  reached  for  the  "makings"  he  stopped,  his  eyes  got 
big,  and  turning  his  companion  around  so  that  he  too 
might  see,  remarked: 

"Well,  I've  been  in  this  man's  army  twenty  years  now, 
and  seen  service  in  the  Islands,  China,  Cuba  and  Alaska, 
but  that's  a  new  uniform  on  me." 

The  officer  wearing  the  strange  looking  uniform  stopped 
and  idly  swinging  his  crop  stood  looking  over  the  field 
while  the  old  sergeant  continued. 

"No,"  he  muttered,  as  though  talking  to  himself,  "he 
can't  be  an  officer  out  of  the  'Leathernecks'  'cause  if  he 
was  he'd  be  advertising  with  a  band  or  a  signboard. 
He  can't  be  French  'cause  he  hasn't  got  a  mustache. 
He  can't  be  English  or  an  Aviator  'cause  he  hasn't  got 
his  hands  in  his  pockets.  He  can't 
be  no  Hun  'cause  they  wouldn't  let 
him  be  running  loose.  He  ain't 
no  Belgian  'cause  that  ain't  no 
Belgian  shield  on  his  cap.  He 
ain't  no  Scotchman,  'cause  he's  got 
on  pants."  Finally  he  burst  out: 
"Say,  Sergeant,  you've  been  over 
there  where  they  all  congregate: 
what  is  he?" 

"  Why  that's  one  of  our  officers." 

"Well,  what  uniform  is  he 
wearin'?" 

"That's  our  uniform." 

"Like  hell  it  is.  We've  got  a 
good  uniform  of  our  own,  and  it 
don't  look  like  that,  none  what- 
ever." 

"It's  just  been  adopted  in  the 
United  States  Army,  and 
officers  and  enlisted  men  will    both   have    to    wear  it." 

"Well,  I've  stood  more  pay  calls  than  most  of  the  of- 
ficers and  men  I  can  see  from  where  I  stand  have  stood 
reveilles  but  I  never  thought  I'd  have  to  go  on  pass  look- 
ing like  a  leatherneck  non-com  on  shore  leave.  But  what's 
the  blue  band  around  his  cap?" 

"That's  to  show  he's  an  infantry  officer." 

"You  could  tell  that  by  the  way  he  walks,  but  what 
are  the  cute  little  cuffs  on  his  blouse?" 

"  That's  copied  from  the  British  uniform  and  shows  the 
rank  of  the  officer  on  his  sleeve." 

"So  it  does.  But  what  are  the  little  colored  dabs  on 
the  front  of  his  collar?" 

"They  show  his  branch  of  service  and  his  regimental 
designation.     That  was  copied  from  the  French  uniform." 

"What  are  the  pants  made  like  'cits'  for?" 

"The  tailors  say  they  fit  better  and  are  easier  to  cut 
than  the  old  lace  knee  breeches,  and  they  save  the  cost 
of  leggins." 

"Even  at  that,  the  tailors  have  nothing  to  brag  about. 
I've  always  had  to  take  every  pair  of  breeches  I  drew  to 
the  regimental  tailor  before  I  could  get  into  them,  or  get 
them  to  stay  on  me,  and  I  certainly  would  love  to  see  a 
squad  dressed  in  them  things  crawling  around  the  rice 
paddies  on  the  old  South  Line  in  Cuba.  But  what  are  the 
big  pockets  for?  " 


"They  were  fashioned  after  the  bell  pockets  in  the 
British  uniform.  They  have  greater  carrying  capacity." 
"That  may  be  all  right,  but  since  prohibition  hit  the 
army  I  don't  see  anything  for  an  officer  to  be  carrying 
that  would  take  up  that  much  room.  I  guess  he  forgot 
his  collar  ornaments." 

"Oh,  no.  They  were  sacrificed  as  a  compliment  to  the 
ladies.  You  see,  the  wear  and  tear  on  charmeuse  and 
crepe-de-chine  sleeves  was  terrible,  so  again  copying  the 
French  we  left  off  the  ornaments.  Besides  it  saves  larass 
and  bronze." 

"Saving  bronze  may  be  all  right,  but  the  supply  of 
brass  don't  seem  to  be  running  so  low.     But  anything  for 
the  ladies.     Say,  what  is  his  rank?" 
"He's  a  captain." 
"How  do  you  tell?" 

"By  those  three  little  doo-jiggers  on  his  cuffs  and 
shoulder  straps." 

"Well,  well!     Say,    youngster, 
did  you  ever  hear  the    legend  of 
our  insignia  of  rank  in  the  army?" 
"No." 

"I  find  that  a  lot  of  you  chaps 
haven't.   In  the  old  days  when  the 
army  was  a  profession  and   not  a 
business  or  a    trade,    a    shavetail 
didn't  wear  nothin'  on  his  shoul- 
der straps   because   he    was  just 
coming  into  the  army  as  an  offi- 
cer and  was  looking  forward  into 
the  army  field.     Before  him  was 
his  whole  army   future,   behind   a 
two  barred  fence.     The  first  lieu- 
tenant had  climbed  one  bar  and 
had  it  on  his  shoulder;  the  captain 
had  climbed   the   fence   and   was 
looking  up  into  the  forest,  and  had 
both  bars  on   his   shoulder.      The 
major  had  climbed  into  the  sturdy  oak    tree    and    got 
a  gold  leaf,  and  the  lieutenant-colonel  was   still    in    the 
woods  but  had  climbed  into  the  poplar,  which  is  the  tall- 
est, straightest  tree  in  the  forest,  and  he   has   the   silver 
poplar  leaf.     The  colonel  wears  the  eagle  because  it  flies 
over  the  forest  and  keeps  watch  on   things  below,   while 
high  in  the  skies  is  the  star  of  a  general.  That's  a  pretty 
story,  ain't  it?  and  it  looks  like  a  shame  to  mess  it   up 
for  the  sake  of  a  few  uniform  makers  whose  only  interest 
in  the  army  is  what  they  can  sell  to  Uncle  Sam,  'jaw-bone.' 
By    the    way,    who    thought    up    all    these    changes?" 
"Oh,  some  e.xpatriate." 
"Somewhat?" 

"Expatriate.  That  means  a  chap  who  lived  at  home 
most  of  his  life  and  then  went  across  to  Europe  and  stayed 
a  while  and  decided  everything  European  was  better  than 
anything  American.  They  think  it's  prettier  than  our 
present  uniform.     Do  you?" 

"Well,  it  may  be  more  'showy'  son,  but  the  old  0.  D. 
is  good  enough  for  yours  truly.  The  United  States  has 
toddled  along  and  won  a  number  of  sizeable  scraps  and 
cleared  a  big  country  of  redskins  without  ringing  in  any 
foreign  uniform  changes  to  help  us  out,  and  we  won  be- 
cause we  depended  on  the  man  inside  the  suit  and  not 
what  was  showing  outside.  In  the  face  of  that,  I'd  hate 
to  see  them  change  it  now." 


[39; 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


EVERYBODY  OUT  FOR  DRILL! 

Soldiers  Were  Fit  to  Bite  as  Well  as  Fight  in   This 

Man's  Army 


INCREASING  the  physical  standard  of  Camp  Travis 
men  and  raising  the  morale  of  the  command  through 
proper  attention  to  the  soldier's  teeth  has  been  the 
accomplishment  of  the  Dental  Infirmary  personnel.  This 
work  has  been  successful  to  no  small  degree  in  the  main- 
tenance of  the  excellent  health  record  of  the  cantonment, 
and  was  the  means  by  which  the  mouth  of  every  enlisted 
man  received  attention,  both  through  reparative  and 
preventive  measures. 

Statistics  from  the  front  showed  that  fully  twenty  per- 
cent, of  the  men  in  sick  wards  were 
there  as  the  result  of  infections  from 
diseased  teeth.  By  prevention  of 
these  infections,  through  prompt  and 
adequate  treatment  in  the  training 
camp,  the  American  army  planned 
to  increase  the  efficiency  of  the  com- 
mands proportionately  besides  mak- 
ing available  twenty  percent,  more 
bed  room  for  wounded  soldiery  and 
bettering  the  army  morale.  With 
this  end  in  view,  Col.  A.  C.  Carpenter, 
the  camp  dental  surgeon,collaborated 
with  the  camp  commander  and  the 
camp  surgeon  so  that  not  a  soldier 
in  training  failed  to  receive  the 
proper  treatment  his  condition  re- 
quired. This  policy  was  carried  out 
with  the  Ninetieth  Division  and  the 
importance  of  dental  supervision  for 
this  command  was  so  thoroughly 
recognized  that  when  this  division 
was  ordered  overseas  last  June  it 
took  with  it  the  entire  infirmary 
personnel  consisting  of  thirty-three 
officers  and  an  equal  number  of 
assistants. 

In  the  treatment  of  the  soldiers,  each  man  reporting  for 
examination  was  assigned  to  some  officer  and  given  a  card 
for  future  appointments.  It  was  then  the  duty  of  the 
officer  to  see  to  it  that  the  mouth  of  the  patient  was  placed 
in  as  perfect  a  condition  as  possible  before  he  was  excused, 
also  to  give  him  a  thorough  course  of  instruction  in  the 
proper  care  of  the  mouth  and  teeth.  It  was  believed  that 
the  instruction  in  mouth  hygiene,  alone,  is  sufficient  to 
prove  the  worth  of  the  dental  surgeon  in  the  army.  In 
order  to  expedite  work,  dental  surgeons  who  were  particu- 
larly proficient  in  certain  branches  were  assigned  to  their 
specialties. 

The  work  done  in  these  infirmaries  consisted  of  amalgam 
fillings,  synthetic  fillings,  cement  fillings,  X-rays,  root 
canal  work,  gold  inlays,  plates,  bridges  and  extractions. 
All  fillings  were  carved  and  polished  and  many  of  them 
could  be  properly  classed  as  restorations.     In  carrying 


COL.  A.  C.  CARPENTER 
Camp  Dental  Surgeon 


out  the  work  of  the  operating  room,  the  dental  specialists 
followed  methods  accepted  by  the  medical  fraternity  as 
preventive  of  numerous  chronic  diseases. 

Benefits  from  such  treatment  were  shown  in  the  second 
examinations  of  men  treated  and  in  their  physical  records. 
Men  who  had  followed  the  instructions  on  mouth  hygiene 
were  proved  to  be  greatly  improved  in  general  health.  In 
addition  to  the  alleviation  of  pain,  the  treatments  given 
enabled  the  men  to  masticate  their  food  more  thoroughly, 
thus  aiding  in  the  digestion  of  foods  and  promoting  their 
general  health  and  well  being,  and 
their  contentment  under  the  re- 
straints of  army  life.  General  clean- 
liness of  the  teeth,  as  practiced  by 
the  men  while  in  the  army,  is  ex- 
pected to  keep  them  in  the  habits 
they  have  formed,  so  that  they  will 
instruct  their  children  and  wives  in 
mouth  hygiene.  This  will  prove  its 
own  reward  in  the  sav-ing  to  the 
families  of  the  men  and  in  the  con- 
tinuance of  their  good  health. 

The  experience  of  the  Camp  Travis 
dental  unit  has  proved  the  superi- 
ority of  massing  dentists  in  infirm- 
aries, rather  than  distributing  them 
around  many  medical  infirmaries,  as 
heretofore.  The  saving  in  time  and 
the  production  of  improved  efficiency 
in  handling  patients  has  been  a  large 
factor  in  the  success  attained.  The 
waste  of  medical  supplies  has  been 
materially  decreased  under  the  new 
system  as  well  as  the  maintenance 
of  excessive  equipment.  But  the 
surpassing  feature  has  been  the 
greater  facility  of  marshaling  the 
men  for  sjiecialized  treatments  with  the  minimum  of 
loss  of  time  and  materials  and  the  maximum  results  in 
lasting  benefits. 

Many  statements  have  been  made  to  dental  surgeons  by 
the  enlisted  men  expressing  satisfaction  with  the  service 
given  and  delight  over  their  freedom  from  pain  and  dis- 
eases to  which  they  were  subject  when  they  were  in 
civilian  life.  Numbers  of  men  say  they  have  been  relieved 
from  attacks  of  rheumatism  and  disorders  of  the  digestive 
tract  which  were  the  result  of  mal-nutrition  resultant  from 
failure  to  masticate  their  food  because  of  bad  teeth  and 
improper  care.  These  teachings,  it  is  felt,  will  have  a 
lasting  effect  on  the  men  as  they  leave  the  army 
and  resume  their  duties  as  citizens,  and  will  prob- 
ably result  in  the  removal  of  much  sickness  which 
was  prevalent  in  rural  districts  during  the  pre-war 
periods. 


40 


CAMP    TRAVIS    AND    THE    WORLD    WAR 


Tmops     i'«v  f^Ol 

r    ON      K.'P.   A©Ali 
I  JUWPAV,  'CAU3 

1  GOTTA  dea  - 


I  ■EYEL65ST=»oTATOtS 


K.    p. 


They're  Out  of  Their  Job 

Ye  doughboys  and  leathernecks,  wagon-men  too. 

An'  mariners  ridin'  the  foam, 

The  curtain  is  down  and  your  mad  play  is  done. 

An'  we're  waitin'  to  welcome  you  home. 

For  deeds  of  your  valor  and  might  of  your  arm, 

With  the  old  Yankee  "guts"  ye  have  kept  us  from  harm. 

They're  waitin'  you  now  back  in  oflSce  and  farm, 

So  speed  your  way  home. 

But  we're  bearin'  a  grudge  that  all  time  can't  erase, 

You  boys  who  chased  Fritz  oil  the  map. 

For  you've  cheated  this  army  at  home  of  its  job, 

We  wanted  to  get  in  the  scrap. 

Us  doughboys  an'  leathernecks,  cannon-men  too, 

All  trainin'  and  strainin'  with  that  end  in  view. 

Must  pack  up  our  duds  and  slink  back  to  the  few 

Who  never  got  in  it  at  all. 

There's  men  in  our  ranks  who  have  soldiered  for  years. 

An'  fathered  the  gang  who  went  through. 

Who  taught  'em  to  stand  straight  and  how  to  make  good, 

As  rookies  so  timid  and  new. 

An'  now  that  it's  over  there's  rookies  with  stripes — 

While  all  we  can  do  is  to  suck  on  our  pipes 

And  growl  at  the  world. 

So  when  depot  brigades  stand  retreat  in  the  dusk, 

An'  the  flag  flutters  down  in  the  breeze. 

As  the  strains  of  the  national  anthem  ring  out. 

An'  a  thrill  reaches  down  to  your  knees. 

You'll  pardon  our  feelin'  that  we're  out  o'  luck. 

An'  heaven  must  help  the  unfortunate  duck 

Who  dares  to  suggest  that  we're  lacking  in  pluck. 

For  we'll  sure  hit  him  hard. 

So  you  doughboys  an'  leathernecks,  wagon-men  too. 

Before  you  come  back  to  your  jobs — 

Having  made  this  old  world  somewhat  safer  to  use — 

Before  you  are  cheered  by  the  mobs, 

Just  hand  Mr.  Hun  a  brief  message  from  us : 

We're  spoilin'  and  anxious  to  start  a  new  muss — 

The  two  million  who  didn't  get  into  the  fuss — 

If  he  doesn't  behave. 

— One  of  Them. 


The  Call 

Something  calls — and  we  want  to  go  over; 

We  want  to  go  where  comrades  have  led. 
From  these  white  cotton  fields  and  the  sweet  smelling 
clover, 

To  roads  where  the  flowers  of  battle  are  red. 

Here,  friendly  highways  companion  your  noondays, 

Sunshine  a-spatter  on  still  forest  lanes, 
Fields  hushed  in  beauty  when  night  floods  the  noontide 

And  ponchos  and  shelter  whenever  it  rains. 

There  roads  are  shattered  and  young  lads  around  them; 

Bullets  will  spatter  instead  of  the  sun; 
And  up  from  the  byways  limp  men  who  have  found  them. 

And  back  from  the  highways  the  ghosts  of  men  run. 

Something  calls — yes,  we  smell  every  cluster  of  clover. 

We  see  here  the  meadows,  each  blossom  is  gay, 
And  the  song  of  the  wind — but  we  want  to  go  over. 

It  calls  and  we  want  to  go  over  to-day. 

Passing  the  Buck 

The  Colonel  tells  the  Major 

When  he  wants  something  done; 
And  the  Major  tells  the  Captain 

And  gets  him  on  the  run. 

The  Captain  thinks  it  over, 

Decides  to  follow  suit 
And  passes  the  buck  and  baggage 

To  some  shave  tail  second  Lieut.  * 

The  said  Lieutenant  ponders 

And  strokes  his  downy  jaw. 
And  calls  his  trusty  Sergeant 

And  lays  him  down  the  law. 

The  Sergeant  calls  his  Corporal 

To  see  what  he  can  see; 
And  the  Corporal  gets  a  Private 

And  that  poor  damned  Private's  me. 


41] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


OFFICERS.  ORDNANCE  DEPOT 


Capt.  R.  W.  Wagener 

1st  Lieut.  George  Hilsinger 


Left 
2nd  Lieut.  B.  V.  Brady 
2nd  Lieut.  Guy  W.  Jones 


to  Right 

2nd  Lieut.  Earle  P.  Reebel 
2nd  Lieut.  Howard  Deutz 


Capt.  Henry  L.  Suydam 
Maj.  E.  B.  Johns 


RED  FLAG  AND  BURSTING  BOMB 

This  Does  Not  Refer  to  Bolsheviki  But  to  the  Camp  Ordnance  Depot 


A  SOLDIER  is  no  soldier — without  a  gun.  The  re- 
cruit no  sooner  dons  his  khaki  than  a  rifle,  a  bay- 
onet and  a  cartridge  belt  are  handed  out  to  him; 
yet  these  do  not  spring  up  at  command,  nor  flower  over 
night,  even  in  the  prolific  soil  of  Texas — all  of  which  nat- 
urally leads  to  the  inquiry  of  how  and  where  they  get  'em. 
Some  one  says  "Ordnance" — and  we  go  to  look  for  the 
red  flag  with  the  bursting  bomb. 

You  find  the  Ordnance  Depot  at  Eleventh  Street  and 
Avenue  B,  and,  catching  the  officer  in  charge  off  his  guard, 
announce  that  you  have  come  to  find  out  ev^erything  the 
Ordnance  does  and  does  not,  and  see  the  things,  however 
deadly,  that  are  kept  from  the  gaze  of  the  general  public. 
With  a  fatherly  smile  he  tells  you  that  before  getting  your- 
self involved  with  the  intricacy  and  detaU  of  the  names, 
functions  and  classification  of  the  weapons  and  equip- 
ment, you  might  well  listen  to  an  explanation  of  the 
status  of  the  depot  itself. 

You  learn  then,  that  the  depot  is  properly  known  as  a 
Field  Depot,  and  is  one  of  the  many  established  at  every 
camp  in  the  country,  under  the  guidance  of  the  Field 
Depot  Branch  of  the  Supply  Division,  Ordnance  Depart- 
ment. Other  divisions  of  the  Ordnance  Department  have 
to  do  with  the  purchase  or  production  of  materials,  and 
the  settlement  of  the  problems  of  mechanics  and  engin- 
eering connected  therewith,  but  it  is  the  Supply  Division, 
through  its  field  depots,  that  comes  directly  in  contact 
with  the  soldier,  and  furnishes  to  him  the  various  articles 
of  equipment  suppUed  by  this  department.  This  supply 
is  worked  out  through  a  system  of  shipments  directed 
from  designated  arsenals,  general  supply  depots,  and  man- 
ufacturers to  each  particular  field  depot,  of  what  might 
be  called  initial  equipment — that  necessary  arm  to  and 
equip  the  troops  of  the  various  branches  of  the  service,  in 
the  first  instance.  This  is  later  followed  up  by  requisi- 
tions of  the  field  depot  to  cover  any  shortages  in  the  equip- 


ment of  the  troops,  and  to  pro\'ide  for  that  endless  stream 
of  supplies  needed  in  the  replacement  of  lost,  damaged  or 
unserviceable  equipment;  and  the  various  articles  which 
are  consumed  by  the  use  to  which  they  are  put — illustrated 
by  cleaning  materials  and  ammimition  used  in  target 
practice.  A  scientific  balance  of  stores  book,  acting  as  a 
perpetual  inventory,  with  reports  on  all  stock  in  the  dep)ot 
rendered  at  stated  intervals,  enables  the  Supply  Division 
at  Washington  to  exercise  a  centralized  control  and  equal- 
ize the  stocks  in  the  various  field  depots,  as  the  necessities 
of  the  troops  demand. 

After  assimilating  this,  you  cross  the  road  to  two  par- 
allel warehouses,  with  trackage  between,  and  are  initiated 
into  the  mysteries  of  ordnance.  The  near  end  of  this 
warehouse  is  partitioned  off,  to  provide  for  what  are 
known  as  valuable  stores,  and  stores  in  which  frequent 
issues  are  made  in  small  amounts.  The  first  contains  a 
multitude  of  numbered  and  lettered  drawers  and  com- 
partments in  which  are  spare  parts,  down  to  the  finest 
spring,  pin,  and  washer,  of  every  make  of  machine-gun, 
rifle,  pistol  and  revolver,  with  a  chart-index  on  the  wall 
to  permit  instant  location  of  any  desired  item.  In  arm 
lockers  on  the  wall  are  foimd  one  or  two  of  each  model  of 
machine  gun,  rifle,  pistol  and  revolver. 

Up  to  this  point  your  mind  is  almost  equal  to  following 
the  explanations  poured  in  your  ear  of  the  comparisons 
and  functioning  of  these  various  parts,  but  on  turning  you 
are  confronted  with  an  array  of  articles  described  as  fire 
control  equipment.  Range  finders,  aiming  circles,  adil- 
ades,  flash  lights,  and  battery  commanders'  telescopes; 
pantographs,  compasses,  clinometers,  protractors,  mus- 
ketry rules,  and  fire  control  rules  for  automatic  rifles  and 
machine  guns;  telescopic  sights  and  sighting  devices, 
periscopes  and  sitascopes. 

Next  come  tier  after  tier  of  bins,  tagged  and  numbered; 
with  cartridge  belts,  haversacks,  pack-carriers,  canteen- 


42 


CAMP    TRAVIS    AND    THE    WORLD    WAR 


UNLOABING  CAMOUFLAGED  GUNS 


•covers,  ration-gags,  magazine  and  revolver  clip  pockets, 
and  packets  for  first-aid  pouch;  wire  cutters  and  their 
carriers;  ammunition  carriers;  pouches  and  special  belts 
for  automatic  rifle-men;  spurs,  spur-straps;  rifle-scab- 
bards, and  a  variety  of  articles  pecuhar  to  the  equip- 
ment of  mounted  men.  Special  oils  and  soaps  for  the 
treatment  of  leather;  for  the  treatment  of  web-equipment; 
oils  for  lubricating  and  preserving  metals;  solutions  for 
the  removal  of  powder  and  metal  fouling  from  the  bore 
■of  guns;  paints  and  rust  preventatives  for  the  preserva- 
tion of  artillery  and  artillery  material. 

Passing  out  into  the  storehouse  proper,  you  find  it 
divided  into  numbered  sections  with  an  orderly  arrange- 
ment of  sealed  boxes,  each  with  its  contents  neatly  sten- 
ciled on  either  end.  The  first  portion  is  devoted  to  per- 
sonal equipment — haversacks,  pack-carriers,  cartridge 
belts,  canteen-covers,  canteens,  and  articles  of  the  mess 
kit;  then  machine  guns  with  their  tripods,  feed-belts  and 
water  boxes;  trench  mortars  in  their  coffin-like  boxes; 
automatic  rifles  with  their  magazines  and  accessories; 
rifles  and  gun  slings;  bayonets  and  bayonet  scabbards; 
fencing  equipment;  target  of  all  designs,  and  target  mate- 
rial; saddles  and  bridles  for  the  cavalry;  saddles,  bridles 
and  harness  for  the  artillery;  entrenching  tools;  smoke- 
bomb  outfits,  and  various  spare  parts  pertaining  to  ar- 
tillery. 

Adjoining  the  warehouses  are  ranged  row  after  row  of 
seventy-five  mm.  guns,  with  their  limbers  and  caissons, 
direct  from  the  steel  works,  with  the  camouflage  paint 
scarcely  dried.  They  are  surrounded  by  a  line  of  four- 
ton  artillery  tractors,  hump-backed  and  malignant  in  ap- 
pearance, that  seem  to  dominate  the  silent  guns. 

With  the  hope  that  there  are  no  nails  in  our  shoes,  we 
are  next  led  to  the  magazines,  which,  to  promote  the  peace 
of  mind  of  all  concerned,  stand  a  little  apart  from  the 
rest  of  the  depot  buildings.  Here  are  stored  the  ammu- 
nition and  e.xplosives,  which  range  from  the  six-inch  how- 
itzer and  155  mm.  shells  to  the  .22  shorts  used  in  gallery 
practice.  High  explosive  shells  and  shrapnel,  with  their 
fuzes,  for  the  artillery;  six-inch  and  three-inch  bombs  for 
trench  mortars;  dummy,  drill  and  sectionalized  shells  for 
instruction;  eight  mm.  Lebel  (French)  for  the  Chauchat 
automatic  rifle;   calibre  thirty,  in  ball  cartridges,  blanks, 


guard  and  dummy,  for  our  own  rifle,  with  specially  pre- 
pared grades  for  use  in  machine-guns,  for  overseas,  and  for 
target  practice  in  the  United  States;  forty-five  for  the 
pistol  and  revolver.  Grenades  of  all  kinds — hand  gren- 
ades, rifle  grenades,  dummy  grenades,  practice  grenades, 
illuminating  grenades,  offensive  grenades,  defensive  gren- 
ades, with  their  bouchons  and  components.  Powder  in 
kegs  and  containers,  fuzes  and  detonators.  Next  come  a 
variegated  array  of  lights,  reminiscent  of  Roman  candles 
and  the  Fourth  of  July,  which  are  pyrotechnic  equipment 
— consisting  of  position  lights,  red,  white  and  green;  Very 
lights,  for  use  in  Very  pistols,  in  the  same  number  of  col- 
ors; Bengal  lights,  and  a  score  of  others.  All  of  which 
let  in  a  deal  of  light  on  things  we  had  been  in  the  dark 
about. 

We  could  not  leave  without  seeing  the  shops — a  separ- 
ate one  for  armorers,  who  repair  guns,  for  blacksmiths,  for 
saddlers,  and  for  carpenters — in  which  saddles  are  made 
so  that  the  rider  can't  fall  off.  Here  the  insides  of  ma- 
chine-guns are  tickled  and  oiled  until  they  respond  with 
clock-like  regularity;  and,  incidentally,  hat-cords  and 
fatigue  uniforms  are  removed  from  rifle  barrels  where 
they  were  thoughtlessly  left  by  some  later  possessor  in 
the  excitement  of  being  mustered  out.  An  armorer  ac- 
companies each  regiment  to  the  target  range,  whose  busi- 
ness it  is  to  pacify  the  rifles  which  become  obstinate  in 
eating  up  the  300,000  odd  rounds  of  cartridges  used  by  a 
regiment  in  firing  its  course  on  the  range  at  Camp 
Bullis. 

We  were  inclined  to  retrace  our  steps  in  an  attempt  to 
examine  again,  and  fix  in  our  mind  at  least  a  few  more  of 
the  50,000  odd  articles  furnished  by  the  Ordnance  Depart- 
ment, only  a  few  of  which  we  have  been  able  to  mention 
here,  but  we  were  told  the  warehouses  were  about  to  be 
closed  for  the  taking  a  complete  physical  inventory  of  all 
the  equipment.  The  strictly  supply  functions  of  the  Ord- 
nance Department,  together  with  part  of  the  personnel, 
have  been  taken  over  by  the  Purchase,  Storage  and  Traf- 
fic Division  of  the  General  Staff  in  a  comprehensive  plan 
embracing  all  supply  corps.  However,  the  shops,  the 
magazines  with  ammunition,  and  the  functions  of  inspec- 
tion and  repair  of  guns  and  arms  of  all  kinds  will  still  be 
carried  on  by  the  Ordnance  Depot  Company. 


43] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


PSVCHOLOCICAL  UMT 


WHY  IS  A  FISH? 

Foolish  Question?     Ask  Any  Man  Who  Has  Been 
Before  the  Psychological  Board 


PRIVATE  JOHN  THOMPSON'S  company  had  re- 
ceived an  order  to  report  at  the  Psychological  build- 
ing for  examination,  and  speculation  was  brisk  in 
squad  room  and  mess  hall.  Some  of  the  men  feared  an 
unpleasant  ordeal  at  the  hands  of  what  they  termed  "nut 
pickers,"  and  Private  Thompson  and  Zeke  Gray,  who 
bunked  next  to  him,  discussed  possible  developments  as 
they  waited  for  the  top  sergeant's  whistle. 

In  civil  life  Thompson  was  the  efficient  young  book- 
keeper and  collector  for  the  Doeville  Mercantile  Com- 
pany, and  he  was  sorely  missed  when  he  entered  the  army. 
"The  army's  getting  a  cracking  good  soldier,"  said  his 
employer.  "Darned  shame  he  was  turned  down  for  the 
R.  O.  T.  C."  Zeke  Gray's  father  was  a  p)oor  tenant 
farmer.  His  younger  brother  often  went  with  the  old 
man  to  town  to  disp)Ose  of  the  crops,  but  little  confidence 
was  imposed  in  Zeke,  who  stayed  at  home  and  ploughed. 

As  John  entered  the  Alpha  Room  at  the  Psychological 
Building  with  a  beaver  board  in  one  hand  and  pencil  in 
the  other,  his  mind  was  filled  with  misgivings.  He  wished 
then  that  he  had  gone  to  college  and  had  prepared  himself 
for  this  test  of  his  mentality.  Zeke,  who  followed  John, 
looked  blank  amazement. 

"Thought  they  had  chairs  and  tables  in  schools,"  he 
ventured. 

"If  the  room  was  full  of  furniture,  how  do  you  think 
they  would  get  all  these  men  in  here?"  John  replied. 

"Uh-huh,"  said  Zeke,  grinning. 

The  examination  began  and  the  two  men  looked  at  the 
geometrical  forms  on  the  page  before  them.  The  exam- 
iner and  impressive  looking  sergeant  began  his  instructions. 

"When  I  say  go,  but  not  before,  put  a  cross  in  the  first 
circle  and  a  figure  1  in  the  third  circle.     Go!" 

"Doesn't  take  any  geometry  to  do  that,"  John  said  to 
himself. 

When  the  test  of  oral  instructions  was  completed  a  few 


orderlies  walked  about  the  room  jerking  up  certain  men. 
John  was  not  surprised  to  see  Zeke  among  the  number. 
Before  the  second  test  was  started  Zeke  and  the  other 
failures  were  taken  to  the  Beta  room  where  illiterates  and 
foreigners  were  being  examined.  At  the  end  of  the  third 
test  he  was  sent  upstairs  for  an  individual  examination. 
A  private  took  Zeke  into  one  of  the  examining  booths. 
Here  the  examiner  gave  him  a  series  of  numbers  to  say 
backward.  When  2-3-5  was  given  the  farmer  boy  could 
say  5-3-2;  but  when  four  digits,  as  6-5-2-8,  were  given  he 
could  not  retain  them  long  enough  to  give  them  back- 
wards. Nor  could  he  tell  how  much  change  would  be  due 
him  if  he  bought  twelve  cents'  worth  of  stamps  and  paid 
fifteen  cents. 

"What  is  fooUsh  about  this?"  asked  the  examiner.  "A 
bicycle  rider,  being  thrown  from  his  bicycle  in  an  accident, 
struck  his  head  against  a  stone  and  was  instantly  killed. 
They  picked  him  up  and  carried  him  to  the  hospital,  and 
they  do  not  think  he  will  get  well  again." 

"He  should  not  have  been  riding  so  fast,"  replied  Zeke. 

However,  Zeke  could  coimt  backwards  from  twenty  to 
one,  could  answer  very  simple  comprehension  questions, 
tell  one  way  in  which  wood  and  coal  were  alike  and  give 
the  date  correctly.  His  paper  was  marked:  Mental  Age 
8, — E.  A  grade  of  E  means  that  the  subject  should 
either  be  discharged  or  put  in  a  labor  or  development  bat- 
talion. Zeke  was  transferred  to  the  Development  Bat- 
talion and  from  there  to  the  Remount  Station  for  unskilled 
labor.  There  were  two  Zeke  Gray's  in  every  one  hundred 
men  that  come  to  Camp  Travis. 

The  next  day  a  large  A  was  entered  on  John's  quali- 
fication card  and  in  his  service  record.  This  A  meant 
that  in  regard  to  intellectual  ability  John  ranked  in  the 
upper  four  or  five  percent,  of  enlisted  men.  Any  com- 
manding officer  that  looked  at  his  Service  Record  would 
know  that  he  was  a  very  superior  man  although  he  only 


[44] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


possessed  a  high  school  education.  The  Psychological 
Board  agreed  with  Merchant  Wheeler  that  the  arrrly  was 
"getting  a  cracking  good  soldier." 

In  every  hundred  soldiers  there  are  four  John  Thomp- 
sons and  two  Zeke  Grays, 
and  there  are  many  men 
who,  while  not  as  intelligent 
as  John  Thompson  are 
much  more  intelligent  than 
Zeke  Gray.  The  business 
of  the  Psychological  Board 
at  Camp  Travis  is  to  class- 
ify these  men  according  to 
intelligence.  The  superior 
men  that  are  not  quite  as 
high  mentally  as  John 
Thompson  are  marked  B. 
This  group  includes  from 
eight  to  ten  men  out  of  a 
hundred.  The  C  plus 
group  includes  about  fif- 
teen to  eighteen  percent,  of 
all  soldiers.  The  average 
grade  for  soldiers  is  C,  and 
the  C  group  includes  about 
twenty-five  percent.  The 
C  minus  group,  about 
twenty  percent.,  is  com- 
posed of  men  of  low  average 
intelligence.  Inferior  in- 
telligence D  is  made  by 
about  fifteen  percent.  The 
lowest  group  is  divided 
into  two  classes:  (1)  D 
minus  men,  who  are  very  in- 
ferior in  intelligence  but  are 

considered  fit  for  regular  service;  and  (2)  E  men,  whose 
mental  inferiority  justifies  their  recommendation  for  the 
Development  Battalion,  special  service  organization,  or 
discharge. 


Since  April,  1918,  when  the  Psychological  Board  was 
organized  at  Camp  Travis,  roughly  75,000  men  have  been 
classified  by  means  of  the  intelligence  tests.  Camp  Travis 
is  now  one  of  the  four  leading  psychological   centers 

in  the  American  army. 
The  Psychological  Board 
has  assisted:  (1)  in  the 
discovery  of  men  whose 
superior  intelligence  sug- 
gests their  consideration 
for  advancement;  (2)  in 
the  prompt  selection  and 
assignment  to  Develop- 
ment Battalions  of  men 
who  are  so  inferior  mental- 
ly that  they  are  suited  only 
for  selected  assignments; 
(3)  in  forming  organiza- 
tions of  superior  mental 
strength  where  such  su- 
periority is  demanded  by 
the  nature  of  the  work  to 
be  performed ;  (4)  in  select- 
ing suitable  men  for  various 
army  duties  or  for  special 
training  in  colleges  or 
technical  schools;  (5)  in 
the  early  formation  of 
training  groups  within 
regiment  or  battery  in 
order  that  each  man 
may  receive  instruction 
and  drill  according  to 
his  ability  to  profit 
thereby;  (6)  in  the  early 
recognition  of  the  men- 
tally slow  as  contrasted  with  the  stubborn  or  dis- 
obedient; and  (7)  in  the  discovery  of  men  whose  low- 
grade  intelligence  renders  them  either  a  burden  or  a 
menace  to  the  service. 


Don'ts  For  Discharged  Soldiers 

If  it  is  late  in  the  evening  when  you  come  home  don't  take  your  shoes  o^ff  on  the  front 
porch. 

When  you  sit  down  to  dinner  don't  shout :  "  Bring  on  the  Chow."     Neither  should  you 
say :  "  Shoot  the  bread  and  the  slum." 

If  you  should  hear  your  name  mentioned  in   conversation  don't   stand  up  and  yell 
"  Here." 

That  little  roll  of  cloth  on  the  table  with  the  silver  ring  around  it  is  not  a  first-aid  band- 
age ;  it's  your  napkin. 

If  you  get  up  during  the  night,  don't  walk  around  the  house  on  tip-toe,  the  family  will 
think  the  house  is  being  burgled. 

If  you  should  hear  someone  shout,  "  Fire,"  don't  grab  your  mother's  water  pail  and  fall 
in  outside  the  kitchen  door.     There  is  a  fire  department  in  your  town. 

That  little  white  contraption  in  the  corner  of  the  room  is  a  bath  tub.     Father  will  show 
you  how  to  use  it. 

Don't  hit  the  dirt  and  hunt  cover  when  you  hear  a  "rat-tat-tat";  it's  not  a  machine  gun,  it's 
only  your  neighbor  starting  his  flivver. 


45 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


'Eyts. 


Pe  Huns  sho  riu5T  be 

Hfl^D    UP;     DEy   NOT   OMLY 
PUTi     «     CtU^HD     "'"    '>^ 

WATtH    ON    D£    J^INE. 


l^ft'WK 


IiOO\    HYAH  ,   Cow, 
How    Does  you    'spccT 
M£   TO  Ai/t^-  yoy    £/f 
yOL/    Bofl/v    Cor^E    TO 
VARAZ>£  S£1I    *^'f    YO' 


HfNB   1.£<»S. 


A  Black  and  White  Page 


;46] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


TELLING  THE  FOLKS  AT  HOME 

Camp   Travis  Publicity  Office  Pioneer  in  Furnishing  Home  Newspapers 
With  Stories  of  What  the  Soldiers  Were  Doing 


HERE  it  is,  right  here,"  says  Farmer  Smith  as  he 
looks  over  his  specs  at  mother  by  the  fireside 
after  perusing  the  "Weekly  Echo"  of  some  Okla- 
homa county.     "Look  right  here.     Our  John  has  been 
made  a  K.  P.  in  Company  G.    That's  what  I  call  gittin' 
there  plumb  fast.    He  only  joined  the  army  last  week." 

That  was  only  a  sample  of  the  thousands  of  weekly 
items  in  the  home  paper  which  the  Publicity  Office  of 
Camp  Travis  put  over,  when  the  boys  were  in  training  from 
the  draft  and  volunteer  battalions  of  Texas,  Oklahoma, 
Arkansas  and  New  Mexico.  It  was  the  Camp  Travis  way 
of  making  the  home  folks  see  soldier 
life.  It  had  a  double  purpose.  It 
spread  contentment  through  the 
camp  itself  and  inspired  the  men  to 
be  better  soldiers,  and  it  showed  to 
the  father,  mother,  wife  or  sweet- 
heart back  home  that  Uncle  Sam 
was  taking  good  care  of  his  boys  in 
khaki. 

Never  a  week  went  by  but  that 
the  weekly  budget  of  news  went 
home  to  the  country  weekly  where 
John  or  Tom  had  lived  before  they 
were  inducted  into  the  army;  and 
every  time  there  was  a  mention  of 
the  boys  from  that  county  or  neigh- 
borhood. It  was  a  system  which 
never  failed  to  keep  the  home  folks 
in  a  good  humor  and  at  the  same 
time  the  publicity  officer  and  his 
staff  at  Camp  Travis  told  what  the 
boys  were  doing  during  their  train- 
ing days.  He  took  them  through 
all  the  processes  of  "squads  right" 
and  "squads  left."  He  showed  how 
the  boys  were  lined  up  for  their  phy- 
sical exams,  and  to  get  their  "shots" 
to  render  them  immune  from  disease. 
He  told  the  mothers  and  fathers  and  sweethearts  how  to 
send  packages  and  letters  to  the  soldier  men,  and  what 
addresses  to  place  on  them.  If  there  was  any  happening 
at  the  camp  which  the  folks  at  home  needed  to  know- 
about,  the  news  was  given  to  them  in  this  weekly  budget 
of  their  home  papers. 

Every  weekly  and  daily  paper  in  Texas  and  Oklahoma 
got  this  service  and  whenever  the  boys  wanted  to  write 
home  to  their  newspaper  editor,  the  letter  was  taken  from 
them  as  they  wrote  it  and  placed  in  readable  shape,  so 
that  there  would  be  no  mistake  in  conveying  the  impres- 
sion the  soldier  wished  to  get  home.  Scores  of  such  soldier 
letters  went  back  to  home  papers,  and  the  best  part  of  the 
whole  system  was  that  it  was  practically  all  done  by  the 
men  themselves.  There  were  company  correspondents  in 
every  regiment  and  detachment  in  camp,  and  every  man 
was  urged  to  give  in  items  about  himself  or  his  comrades. 
It  promoted  good  fellowship  among  the  men  and  built 
company  and  battalion  spirit  and  at  the  same  time  allayed 
any  fears  that  anxious  mothers  or  sweethearts  or  wives 
might  have  concerning  their  army  boys.  The  letters 
dealt  with  the  life  of  the  camp  as  a  whole  and  the  individual 
soldier,  and  at  the  end  of  every  news  budget  was  a  collec- 
tion of  personal  items  and  jokes  on  or  about  the  soldiers 
themselves  from  the  county  from  which  the  newspaper 
drew  its  subscribers. 


CAPTAIN  ROBERT  C.  LOWRY 
Camp  Morale  Officer 


Splendid  successes  were  attained  in  defeating  German 
propaganda  efforts  among  the   country  people.    News 
which  was  without  foundation,  and  which  was  being  spread 
by  enemy  agents  throughout  the  rural  and  urban  districts, 
was  corrected  and  all  the  facts  possible  given  the  news- 
paper readers.    Newspaper  editors  were  kept  informed  on 
changes  in  censorship  regulations  also,  so  that  exaggerated 
or  untrue  reports  of  camp  life  were  kept  from  publication. 
This  service  went  on  month  after  month  for  sixteen 
months,  cumulating  excellent  results  for  morale  building, 
and  for  many  weeks  the  publicity  department  seemed  to 
be  unnoticed  at  Washington.    Then 
requests   for  information   were   re- 
ceived as  to  its  plan  of  operation 
and  an  inspection  was  made  by  an 
army  official  to  confirm  the  good 
reports.    The  Camp  Travis  plan  of 
publicity  was  endorsed  and  in  due 
time  became  the  officially  adopted 
publicity  plan  for  the  army  camps. 
The  publicity  office  was  first  estab- 
lished by  Major  General  Henry  M. 
Allen,  commander  of  the  Ninetieth 
Division.      Lieutenant,   now  Cap- 
tain, Robert  C.  Lowry,  a  Houston 
and   San  Antonio   newspaper  man 
who  had  been  graduated  from  the 
first  Leon  Springs  officers  training 
camp,  was  made  the  publicity  officer. 
The  idea  was  first  suggested  by  Cap- 
tain David  C.  McCaleb,  commander 
of  the  315th  Supply  Train,  of  the 
Ninetieth  Division,  and  the  plan  was 
perfected  and  brought  to  its  greatest 
fruition  by  Captain  Lowry.     This 
officer  organized  company  reporters 
in  all  of  the  groups  of  the  camp 
and  was  responsible  for  the  success 
of  the  plan  and  its  steady  growth. 
After  the  departure  of  the  Ninetieth  for  France,  Captain 
Lowry  was  made  an  officer  of  the  Camp  Headquarters 
Staff  and  continued  the  work  of  the  Publicity  Bureau. 
Early  in  the  fall  of  1918  the  Publicity  Office  was  made 
a  part  of  the  Morale  Section  and  Captain  Lowry  was  made 
the  morale  officer  of  Camp  Travis  as  a  recognition  of  his 
good  work.     Second  Lieutenant  Frederic  Lewis  Earp,  a 
graduate  of  the  Camp  Pike  officers  training  school,  was  ap- 
pointed publicity  officer.    Lieutenant  Earp  is  a  newspaper 
man  of  long  experience  among  the  cities  of  the  Pacific  coast 
and  during  his  incumbency  he  was  of  marked  assistance  to 
the  morale  officer  in  carrying  out  the  publicity  program. 
In  his  work  as  morale  officer,  Captain  Lowry  had  super- 
vision of  the  amusements  of  the  men  in  camp  as  well  as 
the  plans  for  demobilization  of  discharged  soldiers  and 
their  preparation  for  civilian  life.    This  was  an  import- 
ant feature  of  morale  work,  for    the   transition   from 
khaki  to  "cits"  is  no  mere  matter  of  changing  clothes. 
In  this  work  his  office  has  also  been  remarkably  successful 
in  its  co-operation  with  the  Y.  M.  C.  A.,  the  Knights 
of  Columbus,  the  Jewish  Welfare  Board  and  other  activi- 
ties in  the  establishment  of   the   "Khaki  College"  for 
soldiers  returning  to  civil  life,  and  in  the  means  of  in- 
structing soldiers  in  how  to  carry  on  their  insurance  poli- 
cies and  avail  themselves  of  the  benefits  of  the  soldiers 
and  sailors  civil  rights  bill. 


[47: 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


The  "TOP"  as  the  Rookie  Sees  Him 

[48] 


CAMP    TRAVIS    AND    THE    WORLD    WAR 


THE  ARMY  Y 

It  Followed  the  Soldier  from  His  Home  to  the  Firitig  Line 


WITH  "Service"  as  its  motto,  and  with  one  building 
already  active  in  the  area  that  was  to  be  famous 
as  Camp  Travis,  the  Army  Y.  M.  C.  A.,  with  the 
influx  of  regulars,  draft  recruits,  and  construction  forces, 
was  situated  advantageously  from  the  beginning.  Figures 
indicate  only  vaguely  how  the  mission  was  carried  out — 
they  cannot  tell  what  the  Y  meant  to  soldiers,  many  of 
whom  were  away  from  home  for  the  first  long  stay; 
neither  can  they  tell  what  the  association  did  for  the  spirit 
of  the  camp.  Only  the  soldiers  can  tell  that.  But  from 
the  time  the  recruit  was  dropped  down  into  camp  until  he 
marched  off  the  train  at  the  port  of  embarkation,  some 
Camp  Travis  Y  man  was  with  him — and  from  that  point 
another  Y  service  was  with  him.  The  new  soldier  came 
soon  to  look  on  the  Y  man  as  a  sort  of  big  brother,  and  the 
Y  man  tried  to  live 
up  to  it. 

Scarcely  had 
Camp  Travis  been 
begun  when  Urban 
WilHams,  a  former 
border  Y  worker, 
was  brought  here 
in  charge  of  the 
camp,  and  he  re- 
mained until  July, 
1918,  being  ordered 
then  to  take  charge 
of  the  army  Y  work 
in  the  Hawaiian 
Islands.  H.  H. 
Simmons,  later 
head  of  the  South- 
em  Department 
Y.  M.  C.  A.,  di- 
rected the  work  for 
a  time  and  then 
Charles  Kurtzhalz 
was  brought  here 
from  Camp  Pike  to 
take  charge.  Mr. 
Kurtzhaltz       was 

called  to  department  headquarters  of  the  Y  as  second  in 
command,  and  R.  N.  Watts,  who  had  been  at  Camp  Dick 
and  Camp  Bowie  directing  the  Y,  was  made  camp  general 
secretary. 

So  rapid  was  the  growth  of  the  Y  work  that  to  supply 
men  with  the  right  sort  of  training  there  was  opened  in 
April,  1918,.  the  Training  School  for  War  Work,  with 
A.  B.  Nichols  of  the  Boston,  Mass.,  Y.  M.  C.  A.  as  dean. 
Up  to  December  1,  1918,  the  school  had  graduated  673 
men  for  army  Y  service  either  in  England,  France,  Italy, 
Russia  or  the  camps  of  the  Southern  Department.  Not 
all  of  the  men  stayed  in  the  Y  service,  however,  some  going 
to  take  commissions  or  to  shoulder  a  gun,  and  the  service 
flag  holds  fourteen  stars  for  former  Travis  Y  men  now 
soldiers. 

Religious  Activities 

Like  other  branches  of  the  Y  activities,  the  religious 
work  started  in  a  very  small  way,  with  but  twelve  meetings 
held  in  August,  1917,  and  an  attendance  of  2,900;  but  this 
figure  went  up  by  leaps  and  bounds  each  succeeding  month, 
the  attendance  of  thirty-two  meetings  in  September  being 
10,389,  and  at  184  meetings  in  October  it  was  32,300.  At 
this  time  Bible  study  classes  were  formed,  both  in  the  Y 


HEAEQUARTERS   STAFF,  Y.   M.  C.    A. 

Left  to  right— N.  K.  Tracy,  J.  L.  Scudder,  E.  L.  Priest,  J.  B.  Taylor,  W.  H.  Neidlinger, 

J.  S.  Thompson,    R.  N.  Watts,  Miss  Lillian  Pfeiffer,    E.  B.  Coulter,    F.  E.  Dingman, 

J.  B.  Walker.     Standing — Allan  Smith. 


buildings  themselves  and  among  the  men  in  the  barracks, 
with  the  result  that  in  October  there  were  186  Bible  class 
sessions  which  had  an  attendance  of  4,865,  a  fair  average 
for  the  succeeding  months,  although  later  the  number  of 
classes  was  increased.  It  fell  to  the  religious  work  secre- 
taries, too,  to  visit  the  sick,  and  17,768  patients  were 
visited  in  October,  this  number  mounting  as  high  as  30,492 
in  February,  1918. 

Khaki-covered  copies  of  the  New  Testament  were  given 
out  under  the  supervision  of  the  religious  work  men, 
reaching  a  total  of  53,141  from  August  1,  1917,  to  De- 
cember 1, 1918.  Another  odd  bit  of  service  performed  was 
the  conversion  of  conscientious  objectors  from  their  atti- 
tude. A  record  of  seventy-three  such  conversions  was 
made  by  D.  L.  Berry,  of  Y  No.  30.  Conferences  of  en- 
listed men  held 
during  the  summer 
of  1917  gave  the 
Y  men  broader  op- 
portunity to  do 
service. 

When  the  Nine- 
tieth Division  left 
Camp  Travis  in 
May,  1917,  four  or 
five  secretaries 
were  taken  along 
to  the  port  of  em- 
barkation, and  this 
phase  of  Y  work 
has  been  continued 
up  to  date.  It  was 
found  by  military 
men  that  the  Y 
secretaries  could 
encourage  recruits 
on  their  way  to 
camp  by  answer- 
ing questions  about 
the  camp,  and  by 
giving  other  ad- 
vice; while  to  units 
leaving  camp,  it  was  found  that  Y  athletic  equipment  and 
games,  together  with  a  Y  song  leader  to  keep  the  men's 
spirits  up,  did  much  to  bring  a  healthier  lot  of  men 
through  their  journey.  Thus  it  was  that  the  troop  train 
service  was  instituted. 

Hospital  Service 

One  unique  phase  of  Y  work,  begim  on  the  border,  was 
carried  on  at  Camp  Travis  until  March,  1918,  when  the 
Red  Cross  took  it  over.  This  was  the  hospital  service. 
E.  B.  Travis,  a  Y  mnu-'rom  Indiana,  arrived  in  the  El 
Paso  district  late  in  July,  1916,  and  was  almost  imme- 
diately sent  by  Wilman  E.  Adams,  later  head  of  the 
Southern  Department  of  the  Y,  to  Nogales.  Urban 
Williams,  later  camp  general  secretary  at  Camp  Travis, 
was  in  charge  of  the  camp.  Mr.  Travis  at  once  began 
work  among  patients  in  Base  Hospital  No.  5,  supplying 
stamps,  stationery,  books  and  other  articles,  and  per- 
forming any  services  possible  for  the  soldiers.  The  Red 
Cross  had  not  then  developed  its  forces  for  such  work  and 
there  were  too  few  army  chaplains  for  the  task. 

When  Col.  George  M.  Skinner  was  transferred  from  com- 
mand of  the  Nogales  Base  Hospital  to  the  one  at  Fort  Sam 
Houston,  which  then  was  handling  the  soldier-patients 


49] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


from  Camp  Travis,  Colonel  Skinner  immediately  called 
Mr.  Travis  to  aid  him  here.  Mr.  Travis,  arriving  here  in 
September,  1917,  organized  the  work,  extending  it  to  the 
Camp  Travis  Base  Hospital  when  that  institution  was 
completed. 

During  the  winter  of  1917  when  many  of  the  fast-ar- 
riving recruits  became  sick,  these  hospital  workers  under 
Mr.  Travis  Uterally  worked  day  and  night,  with  small 
time  for  sleeping  or  eating.  However,  they  never  lost  the 
smile  or  joke  to  take  into  the  wardrooms  to  cheer  the  sick 
and  the  homesick,  though  it  was  sometimes  a  strain  when 
they  had  to  take  the  last  word  home  of  some  man  about  to 
die  without  his  realizing  his  condition,  or  to  help  others, 
who  knew  they  were  dying,  to  straighten  out  their  affairs 
before  their  death.  The  constant  call  for  these  Y  men 
was  best  proof  that  their  work  was  done  well.  More  than 
once  their  smiles  and  jokes  relieved  critical  tension  in 
ward  rooms  where  death  had  just  preceded  them.  To 
notify  relatives  of  the  condition  of  men  seriously  ill  was 
another  part  of  their  duty,  and  the  hospital  authorities 
co-operated  continuously  in  this  respect. 

However,  in  1918,  when  the  American  Red  Cross  took 
over  the  work,  all  but  one  man  in  each  of  the  base  hospitals 
were  transferred  to  other  duties.  Arrangements  were 
made  then  so  that  a  man  taken  from  any  part  of  the  camp 
to  the  Base  Hospital  was  visited  by  a  secretary  from  the  Y 
serving  the  area  from  which  the  man  was  taken,  thus  keep- 
ing the  patient  in  touch  with  the  doings  of  his  organization. 

Educational  Work 

Although  educational  work  had  been  carried  on  in  a 
small  way  by  various  individual  secretaries,  it  was  not 
until  in  the  fall  of  1917  that  the  Y  began  an  aggressive 
movement  in  that  direction.  At  that  time  W.  R.  Ray- 
mond had  been  placed  in  charge  of  the  work  for  the  whole 
Southern  Department,  and  H.  H.  Shenk,  of  Harrisburg, 
Pa.,  was  the  director  of  that  activity  in  the  camp.  J.  B. 
Taylor,  an  educator  from  New  Mexico,  was  brought  into 
the  camp  soon  after  this,  and  the  comparatively  few 
classes  were  extended.  During  the  early  spring  of  1918 
classes  were  organized  in  English,  mathematics  and  his- 


tory, all  of  which  were  taken  hold  of  with  considerable 
spirit  and  interest. 

Hopeful  of  an  early  crossing  to  the  battlefront,  there 
was  also  a  feeling  among  the  men  that  French  should  be 
mastered,  and  this  sentiment  was  stimulated  by  a  visit  to 
the  camp  of  Lieut.  Jean  Aldide  Picard,  who  had  been  with 
the  French  Army  during  the  battle  of  the  Marne,  and  who 
had  later  seen  service  at  Ypres.  As  a  result  some  fifty 
classes  in  French  were  begun,  Y  secretaries  being  supple- 
mented by  soldier-teachers,  these  classes  lasting  as  long  as 
the  Ninetieth  Division  was  here. 

It  was  early  in  March,  1918,  that  the  work  among  the 
illiterate  soldiers  was  undertaken,  and,  beginning  with 
1 ,700  men,  the  men  coming  into  these  classes  by  military 
order  was  increased  in  May  and  June  to  10,(XX).  It  is 
interesting  to  note  that  at  this  period,  too,  the  first  class 
in  gas  engines  was  established  in  Y  No.  31 — classes  in 
this  subject  forming  a  constant  part  of  the  educational 
program  after  that  time. 

Later,  when  the  camp  had  been  partly  filled  with  new 
officers  and  new  recruits,  who  were  to  make  up  what  is 
now  the  Eighteenth  Division,  the  demand  for  French 
instruction  was  renewed,  and  Prof.  C.  F.  Giard,  of  the 
University  of  Oklahoma,  was  brought  here.  He  at  once 
took  hold  of  the  work  and  in  about  three  weeks  was  fol- 
lowed by  Prof.  Patricio  Gimeno,  of  the  same  university. 
Classes  in  buildings  were  continued,  also,  as  the  men  were 
interested  in  subjects,  ranging  from  elementary  English 
to  advanced  mathematics  and  normal  school  branches. 

However,  in  September,  another  big  opportunity  was 
seized,  and  the  Y  instituted  a  big  central  school  for  enlisted 
men  who  wished  to  review  studies  preparatory  to  taking 
the  examinations  for  officers'  training  camps.  It  is  in- 
teresting to  note  that  in  two  terms  of  this  school,  the  per- 
centage of  men  who  attended  the  school  and  who  passed 
their  educational  test  as  officer-candidates  was  very  high. 

Early  in  December  another  central  school  was  opened 
by  the  Y  in  the  auditorium,  and  the  armistice  having  been 
signed,  the  military  authorities  in  the  camp  made  it  much 
easier  for  the  men  interested  in  the  school  to  take  up  their 
educational  work.  This  school  started  with  so  much  spirit 
that  it  became  necessary  to  have  overflow  classes,  and  some 


50] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


of  these  were  carried  on  in  the  K.  of  C.  building,  in  the 
Jewish  Welfare  Board  building,  and  the  Hostess  House. 
The  registration  ran  close  to  the  2,000  mark  and  the  at- 
tendance was  good  at  all  sessions,  despite  the  fact  that 
some  of  the  soldiers  were  constantly  dropping  out  by 
reason  of  being  discharged  from  the  service.  For  a  time 
the  task  of  securing  sufficient  teachers  was  a  formidable 
one.  Close  on  the  heels  of  this  project  a  similar  plan  was 
undertaken  on  behalf  of  the  colored  soldiers,  a  move  which 
was  met  by  unusually  fine  interest  on  the  part  of  these 
men.  At  first  this  school  was  conducted  in  the  two  negro 
Y  buildings,  but  later  central  quarters  were  secured,  the 
chaplains  of  the  group  giving  all  assistance  possible. 

Y  educational  secretaries  were  used  largely  by  military 
direction  after  the  formation  of  a  development  battalion 
late  in  the  summer,  illiterates,  and  foreigners  who  could 
read  and  write  their  native  language  being  brought  into 
this  group  and  taught  English.  Many  men  who  pre- 
viously were  unable  to  read  and  write  left  the  army 
from  this  battalion  proud  to  be  able  to  sign  their  names 
to  necessary  documents,  and  to  be  able  to  read.  This 
move    toward    better    citizenship   needs    no   comment; 


the   results   of    this    work   will    speak    for  themselves. 

From  a  statistical  viewpoint  the  educational  work 
showed  a  growth  of  from  seventy-one  class  sessions  in 
October,  1917,  to  1,117  class  sessions  in  February,  1918, 
and  the  attendance  of  1,301  at  the  October  sessions  was 
rapidly  swelled  until  in  February  the  attendance  at  these 
sessions  was  19,997.  The  high  water  mark  of  attendance 
was  in  March,  1918,  however,  being  22,268  for  the  month. 

It  was  in  December,  1917,  that  the  first  men  from  the 
Camp  Travis  Y  organization  went  overseas,  and  they 
were  given  a  rousing  send-oflf  by  their  co-workers.  One 
of  these  men,  Dr.  John  H.  Clifford,  who  was  religious 
work  secretary  at  Y  33,  has  since  become  famous  for  his 
work  with  the  Marines,  as  the  man  who  was  told  by  the 
officers  of  that  organization  that  they  "didn't  want  any 

d d  parson  along"  to  be  a  burden  on  them.    Dr. 

Clifford,  by  his  saving  of  the  woxmded  colonel  of  those  same 
Marines,  and  by  his  sturdy  independence  in  toting  his  own 
pack  and  asking  no  odds  of  any  man,  as  well  as  by  his  fine 
spirit  among  the  wounded  Marines,  forms  an  undying  part 
of  Marine  Corps  history,  as  well  as  that  of  Camp  Travis 
Y.  M.  C.  A. 


51 


CAMP    TRAVIS    AND    THE     WORLD    WAR 


CREATED  POPULAR  SOLDIERS'  HOME 

Creeds  Forgotten  in  Halls,   Though  Knights  of  Columbus  Provided 
Services  for  Men  of  Roman  Catholic  Faith 


WHAT  the  Knights  of  Columbus  has  accomplished 
at  Camp  Travis  can  not  be  statistically  tabulated 
and  told  in  words;  it  requires  no  public  encomiast 
to  herald  the  results.     The  encomiums  must  come  from 
the  individual  soldier  who  has  profited  from  its  ministra- 
tions; from  the  parents  of  the  en- 
listed men  who  received  consolation 
from  the  letters  of  their  sons  written 
on'K.  of  C.  stationery,  and  in  their 
halls,  from  the  letters  of  the  secre- 
taries and  chaplains  to  anxious  moth- 
ers about  their  boys  in  the  hospital 
during  the   siege  of  the   epidemic. 
From    all   sources   must   come   the 
praise  or  censure  of  the  welfare  work 
to   make  it  truthful  and  valuable. 

Early  in  the  history  of  Camp 
Travis,  when  the  Ninetieth  Division 
was  being  formed,  this  part  of  Texas 
was  designated  the  Seventh  Division 
in  the  scheme  of  organization  of 
welfare  work  of  the  Knights  of 
Columbus.  The  staff  in  charge  con- 
sisted of  Emmet  T.  Jackson,  archi- 
tect; August  McCloskey,  Hon.  James 
R.  Davis,  and  Edward  H.  Corrigan, 
all  residents  of  San  Antonio.  In 
September,  1917,  they  authorized 
thre  eection  of  K.  of  C.  Hall  No.  1. 
The  site  selected  was  near  the  spot 
where  the  gallant  Lieutenant  Kelly 
lost  his  life  in  an  aeroplane  accident  in  preference  to  kill- 
ing and  maiming  others.  It  is  located  on  Sixth  Street  near 
Avenue  B.  The  hall  was  formally  opened  on  Columbus 
Day,  October  12, 1917,  with  addresses  by  Rt.  Rev.  Bishop 
John  W.  Shaw,  now  archbishop  of  New  Orleans,  Major- 
General  Henry  T.  Allen,  commander  of  the  Ninetieth  Di- 
vision, and  others.  The  first  general  secretary  was  Edward 
H.  Corrigan,  to  whom  much  credit  is  due  for  taking  the 
initiative  in  the  activities  of  the  hall.  He  was  assisted 
by  John  B.  Witherell,  Lewis  F.  Dur- 
rell  and  Ben  Newman. 

Every  Knights  of  Columbus  Hall 
is  provided  with  an  altar  and  all  ap- 
purtenances and  paraphernalia  for 
the  celebration  of  Mass.  The  first 
volunteer  chaplain  was  Rev.  W.  W. 
Hume,  now  administrator  of  this 
diocese.  Army  chaplains  also  offici- 
ated at  different  times. 

Opening  under  the  most  propiti- 
ous conditions.  Knights  of  Columbus 
Hall  No.  1  has  always  been  a  popu- 
lar resort  for  the  soldiers.  It  has 
been  the  aim  to  provide  the  best  of 
entertainments.  In  fact,  Camp 
Travis  was  the  first  cantonment  in 
the  South  to  inaugurate  dancing  in 
Knights  of  Columbus  halls.  This 
was  made  possible  through  the  co- 
operation of  the  Daughters  of  Isa- 
bella, of  San  Antonio,  and  the  camp 
morale  officer.  The  wisdom  of  this 
action  has  never  been  questioned. 

The  individual  work  of  the  sec- 


J.  M.  HUTCHINSON,  General  Secretary 


JOHN  M.  MUNDY,  Chaplain 
[52] 


retaries  among  the  incoming  recruits  will  always  remain 
a  bright  chapter  not  only  in  the  annals  of  the  Knights  of 
Columbus,  but  in  the  hearts  and  memory  of  the  thousands 
of  homesick  rookies  far  from  home  and  in  strange  con- 
ditions and  environments.  In  one  day  35,000  sheets  of 
paper  and  20,000  envelopes  were 
distributed. 

The  success  of  the  first  hall  and 
the  increased  demand  for  more  room 
t.  and  entertainment  for  the  soldiers 

in  different  parts  of  the  camp  neces- 
sitated the  building  of  a  second  hall. 
This  was  accomplished  under  the 
supervision  of  Mr.  Corrigan.  The 
Knights  of  Columbus,  in  the  mean- 
time, enlarging  the  sphere  of  work, 
placed  William  J.  Moriarty,  of  St. 
Louis,  Mo.,  as  Department  Director 
in  charge  of  the  entire  Central-South- 
ern Division,  with  E.  Elmer  Fox,  an 
energetic  general  secretary,  as  super- 
visor. By  authority  and  instructions 
of  these  gentlemen,  Edward  H.  Cor- 
rigan, general  secretary,  erected  Hall 
No.  2,  at  the  corner  of  Wilson  Street 
and  Avenue  E.  It  was  formally 
opened  November  3,  1917.  Secre- 
tary John  Flood  was  placed  in  charge, 
with  Secretary  Harry  J.  Dudley  as 
assistant.  Other  secretaries  that 
were  attached  to  the  camp  were:  M. 
S.  Corcoran,  August  Corvello,  J.  J.  Sullivan,  Joe  Rivierie 
and  Rudolph  Grummel,  with  Chaplains  E.  J.  Roach, 
P.  P.  O'Sullivan  and  T.  L.  Keaney. 

The  necessity  for  this  hall  was  soon  manifest.  Located 
near  the  Depot  Brigade,  it  was  always  open  and  generously 
patronized.  The  personnel  of  the  secretaries  has  been 
changed  as  the  exigencies  of  the  service  demanded  and  a 
high  standard  of  efi&ciency  maintained  at  all  times.  Any- 
thing and  everything  that  was  of  mutual  benefit  to  the 
soldiers  and  that  would  amuse,  in- 
struct, and  assist  in  raising  the  mo- 
rale of  the  soldier  boys  was  welcomed 
by  the  Knights  of  Columbus. 

The  epidemic  of  influenza,  so 
ably  subdued  by  the  efficient  med- 
ical corps  of  Camp  Travis,  was  a  call 
upon  the  energies  of  the  Knights  of 
Columbus  secretaries  that  was  an- 
swered to  their  best  ability  in  the 
hospital  and  the  quarantined  wards. 
The  public  and  personal  acknowledg- 
ment made  by  Brigadier-General 
Geo.  H.  Estes  of  their  assistance 
will  be  treasured  in  the  archives  of 
the  organization  as  evidence  that  the 
Knights  of  Columbus  secretaries, 
prohibited  from  active  soldier  service 
hy  reason  of  age  or  slight  physical 
defects,  endeavored  to  do  their  best  in 
this  great  world's  war,  even  if  that 
part  was  a  small  and  modest  one. 
The  staff  workers  were:  J.  M.  Hut- 
chinson, gen'l  secr'y ;  J.  P.  O'Conneli, 
Guy  C.  Grapple,  and  Ben  Brady. 


^' 


> 


CAMP    TRAVIS    AND    THE    WORLD    WAR 


CoM-Moo^B-  W\uuie^ 


fronnvNiT 

MOMB 


EOS  e^OLDlCR^- 


-AND' 


^vvn  "^''-'r^^,^,^  /" 


Nl&MT 


JA72  RAT 


THROAT  ^VJA&»tK«  EXHALmc*  THE: 
.\MADttYOU  C»Y. 


Oh  '.  PVT-  e>KAT 
mToofATTol 


civilian:?!! 


A  PoputAl^  P/wnWE  AtTHE  C.H 


ov^^ 


■!l  '  M^-       ^     I'    f 

ME*9-e»(aT.  T. BONE  -  e^TATCe'  THAT 
OOie-lDEOF  MAMlPULATlNCa  A  CAN 
OFEHEE  AND  FPY\NC»  LWE^-H\^ 
G»?EATE«'T  •&POKT  le^  OANO\N0t 
AT  THE  C.H. 


PVXe'lMP  Of  THE  DEPOT  WiClAPE 
WHO  fCEte?  LIKE  HE  LOOK'S'.    HC 
ie»  ALWAYS-  WCVClNGi  ONTHE  C.H- 
MAHACiEMENT  \f  \G»lAO^?ANCE  WA^* 
A  Cl^ACV:  ,  HE'D  e-t  A  e\KAHO 
CAMYOM ». 


53 


CAMP    TRAVIS     AND    THE     WORLD    WAR 


STAFF,  RED  CROSS  : 


Left  to  right,  bottom  row 

Mrs.  L.  E.  Case,  Matron,  Convalescent  House. 

Mr.  L.  E.  Case,  Director  Red  Cross  Hospital  Service. 

Mrs.  Eliza  Rankin,  Hospital  Librarian,  Red  Cross. 


Top  row 

G.  W.  Plack,  Red  Cross  Hospital  Worker. 
W.  H.  Meeks,  Red  Cross  Hospital  Worker. 
J.  T.  Bell,  Red  Cross  Hospital  Worker. 


THE  GREATEST  MOTHER  IN  THE  WORLD 


THE  Convalescent  House  was  virtually  a  club  and  a 
home  where  mother,  sister  or  sweetheart  might  come 
at  any  and  all  times  for  a  chat,  or  remain  for  any 
length  of  time  as  a  guest  of  The  Red  Cross  and  be  near  at 
all  times  to  the  bedside  of  the  boy  who  was  sick  in  the  hos- 
pital. When  the  house  was  built  provision  was  made  for 
these  guests  by  including  small  bedrooms  just  off  the  mez- 
zanine floor;  and  thanks  to  the  courtesy  of  the  hospital 
-authorities,  we  were  able  to  arrange  that  the  guests  have 
their  meals  within  a  short  distance  from  both  the  house 
*nd  the  hospital.  That  this  convenience  has  been  appre- 
-ciated  by  many  who  wished  to  be  with  the  boys  during  a 
-crisis,  we  have  had  many  tangible  proofs,  both  in  verbal 
-and  written  expressions. 

The  main  auditorium  of  the  house  offered  a  comfortable, 
home-like  room  where  in  the  daytime  friends  and  relatives 
might  meet,  letters  might  be  written  at  convenient  desks, 
where  Red  Cross  stationery  was  always  available,  games 
might  be  played,  fiction  or  technical  books  obtained  from 
the  Ubrary  which,  under  the  direction  of  a  representative 
of  the  American  Library  Association,  offered  almost  any 
book  that  might  be  called  for.  In  the  evenings  programs 
of  entertainment  were  carried  out  at  least  three  times 
weekly,  offering  moving  pictures,  vaudeville;  and  oc- 
casionally some  musical  star  temporarily  in  San  Antonio 
would  gladly  offer  her  service  for  the  entertainment  of 
the  soldiers. 

The  ladies  of  the  local  chapter  of  The  American  Red 
Cross  have  taken  a  great  interest  and  have  been  very 
active  in  the  hospital  work,  and  besides  visiting,  conducted 
a  program  of  entertainment  once  or  twice  during  the  week, 
took  entertainers  through  the  wards,  distributed  candy  and 
cigarettes,  and  did  the  countless  things  that  are  mentioned 
so  little  but  are  nevertheless  much  appreciated  because  of 
that  touch  which  only  a  woman  can  give. 


Two  cars  were  placed  at  the  disposal  of  the  hospital 
authorities  to  be  used  by  the  surgeons  in  making  their 
rounds  in  isolated  parts  of  the  camp  and  for  various  in- 
spections of  the  sanitary  officers.  Where  it  was  impMjssible 
to  obtain  promptly,  through  military  channels,  any  article 
needed  by  the  surgeons  to  help  them  render  prompt  and 
eflScient  service,  it  was  ordered  at  once  or  purchased 
locally  and  placed  at  their  disposal. 

The  Home  Service  branch  of  our  work  grew  enormously 
in  the  latter  part  of  1918.  Delayed  allotments  and  al- 
lowances were  investigated;  and,  where  necessary,  the 
dependents  advised  to  consult  their  local  Red  Cross  repre- 
sentative, who  in  turn  were  advised  by  the  associate  direc- 
tor to  render  them  any  aid,  financial  or  otherwise,  that 
appeared  necessary.  Through  the  field  director,  a  man 
was  able  to  obtain  the  best  of  legal  advice.  Countless 
telegrams  were  daily  verified  for  the  mUitary  authorities, 
families  and  relatives  advised  of  the  present  whereabouts 
and  condition  of  men;  and  where,  because  of  critical  illness 
or  death,  it  was  necessary  for  a  man  to  go  home,  many 
loans  were  made  for  this  purpose. 

From  oiu-  warehouse  we  distributed  during  1918: 
sweaters,  122,003,  including  distributions  made  to  others 
camps  last  winter;  \\Tistlets,  4,864;  socks,  woolen,  14,110; 
socks,  cotton,  4,488;  helmets,  6,057;  mufflers,  15,476. 

During  the  influenza  epidemic  the  Red  Cross  Convales- 
cent House  was  used  solely  by  friends  and  relatives  of  sick 
men.  Cots  were  set  up  on  the  stage  and  it  was  not  imusual 
to  have  twenty-five  or  thirty  people  spend  the  night  in  the 
building.  The  Nurses'  Recreation  Building  was  converted 
into  sleeping  quarters  for  the  night  nurses. 

The  exigencies  of  the  time  and  the  conditions  in  the 
camps  made  necessary  calls  for  many  articles  which  could 
not  promptly  be  secured  through  military  channels  and  it 
was  our  privilege  to  furnish,  among  other  things,  aspirin, 


[54] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


icebags,  bed  jackets,  bed  shirts,  comforts,  sanitary  drinking 
cups,  41,000  face  masks,  fly  swatters,  operating  gowns  and 
caps,  handkerchiefs,  water  pitchers,  pajamas,  pillow-cases, 
pillows,  pneumonia  jackets,  property  bags,  cuspidors, 
slippers,  sheets,  sweeping  compound,  wash  rags,  clinical 
thermometers,  tooth  brushes,  tooth  paste,  towels  and 
urinals. 

At  Christmas  the  Red  Cross  arranged  small  gifts  for  all 
corps  men  and  patients  at  the  Base  Hospital,  consisting  of 
comfort  kits  containing  handkerchiefs,  wash  rags,  tooth 
brushes  and  tooth  paste,  cigarettes,  needles  and  thread, 
shaving  soap,  cigarette  lighters  and  knife  or  razor.  Dainty 
little  gifts  of  ivory  talcum  powder  boxes,  stationery  and 
other  small  articles  were  given  to  approximately  two  hun- 
dred nurses.  A  small  tree  was  attractively  decorated  and 
placed  in  each  ward  in  charge  of  a  committee  of  ladies 


from  the  local  chapter,  who  went  through  the  wards  dis- 
tributing the  gifts  to  patients,  together  with  candy  and 
cigarettes.  From  the  Base  Hospital,  the  day  after  Christ- 
mas, we  were  pleased  to  receive  the  following: 

"Your  kit  bags  of  gifts  brought  forth  many 
exclamations  of  pleasure  and  wonder  at  your 
liberality.  The  knives  were  easily  the  most 
popular  gifts,  proving  once  more  that  '  men  are 
but  boys  grown  up.' 

Such  assurances  as  these  have  ever  made  it  a  pleasure 
and  a  privilege  to  work  with  the  hospital  authorities  at  all 
times;  particularly  during  the  Christmas  holidays,  and 
bring  to  us  all  a  deeper  appreciation  of  the  men  and  the 
work  the  "Greatest  Mother  in  the  World"  is  doing,  and 
will  do,  until  the  last  man  is  home. 


DOUGHNUTS  FOR  DOUGHBOYS 


WHEN  the  war  began  that  plunged  the  whole  world 
in  misery,  the  Salvation  Army  had  just  celebrated 
its  fiftieth  anniversary.  It  had  years  of  experi- 
ence, organization  and  efficiency.  It  was  prepared  to  play 
a  part  in  the  conflict — and  that  part  has  not  been  insig- 
nificant. As  long 
as  the  soldier  has 
memory  there  will 
be  a  soft  spot  in  his 
heart  for  the  army 
whose  lassies  fed 
home-made  dough- 
nuts  to  battle- 
stained  doughboys 
on  the  very  edge  of 
No  Man's  Land. 

When  the  first 
gun  was  fired,  the 
Salvation  Army 
dispatched  its  offi- 
cers to  the  front  to 
do  what  they  could 
in  a  material  as  well 
as  spiritual  way  for 
the  men  who  were 
fighting  and  dying 
to  make  the  world 
safe  for  democracy. 
In  the  trenches  and 
behind  the  lines, 
its  workers  were  to 
be  found  giving  aid 

and  comfort,  that  the  fighting  spirit  of  the  soldier  might 
not  weaken. 

Huts  were  established  wherever  possible,  at  home  and 
abroad.  The  hut  at  Camp  Travis  was  opened  in  Septem- 
ber, 1918.  It  is  a  neat  two  story  building,  comfortably 
furnished,  and  within  its  walls  the  soldier  was  made  wel- 
come and  taught  to  feel  that  the  place  was  for  him  during 


his  leisure  hours.    The  first  floor  consists  of  a  large,  well- 
lighted  reading  room,  equipped  with  a  library,  magazines 
and  a  talking  machine.    On  one  side  is  a  chapel  with  a 
seating  capacity  of  300. 
The  first  floor  also  contains  a  "Coffee  Ann"  and  a  lunch 

counter  where  re- 
freshments, includ- 
ing the  famous 
Salvation  Army 
doughnuts,  can  be 
bought  at  a  small 
price.  As  many  as 
500  doughnuts 
have  been  sold  in 
a  day.  The  sec- 
ond floor  contains 
twelve  rooms, 
where  soldiers' 
wives  and  relatives 
might  stay  in  I  com- 
fort and  security 
while  visiting. 
There  are  many 
other  features  of 
the  hut  that  rec- 
ommended it  to 
the  soldiers  and 
their  friends.  The 
courtesy  of  the 
attendants,  their 
desire  to  accommo- 
date and  please  has 
made  it  a  popular  resort.  The  Salvation  Army  does  a 
great  deal  of  work  that  is  never  known  generally.  Much 
work  of  this  nature  has  been  performed  at  Camp 
Travis,  and  many  a  soldier  will  hereafter  respect  the 
uniform  of  the  Salvation  Army  because  he  knows  that  it  is 
the  uniform  of  another  good  soldier  and  one  of  Uncle 
Sam's  best  friends. 


THE  PANTRY  WAS  BARE 
This  picture  was  either  taken  during  drill  hours,  or  else  about  five  minutes  after  a  fresh 
batch  of  doughnuts  had  been  cooked.   In  no  other  way  is  it  possible  to  account  for  the  bare 
appearance  of  a  popular  corner  of  an  institution  that  has  endeared  itself  forever  to  soldiers 


[55] 


CAMP    TRAVIS    AND    THE    WORLD    WAR 


BOOK  WORMS  FIND  HAPPY  HOME 

Men  Win  Higher  Places  in  Military  Organization    Through  Aid 
of  Camp  Library  and  Its  Many  Branches 


WHEN  the  country  gathered  together  its  millions  of 
men  into  the  several  camps  that  grew  up  overnight, 
there  came  along  with  the  military  technique  that 
was  rounding  out  a  fighting  machine,  a  group  of  social 
organizations  whose  purpose  it  was  to  care  for  the  needs 
of  the  soldier  in  his  hours  of  freedom  from  military  duties. 
Among  these  was  the  American  Library  Association,  with 
its  well-lighted  library  building  in  each  camp  containing 
thousands  of  books  upon  every  variety  of  subjects,  cur- 
rent magazines  upon  recreational,  technical  and  military 
topics,  comfortable  chairs  and  good  tables;  branch  col- 
lections of  books  and  magazines  in  the  Y.  M.  C.  A., 
Knights  of  Columbus,  Hostess  House,  Jewish  Welfare 
Board,  Salvation  Army  and  Community  Service  buildings. 

The  Camp  Tra\ns  Library  building  was  completed  De- 
cember, 1917,  at 
which  time  the  li- 
brarian began  mov- 
ing into  it  the  sev- 
eral truck  loads  of 
books  which  had 
accumulated  in  the 
Quartermaster's 
warehouses  and  the 
various  freight  sta- 
tions. With  the  aid 
of  volunteers  from 
the  city  and  from 
among  the  officers 
and  men  in  the 
camp,  the  immense 
task  of  preparing 
the  books  for  circu- 
lation was  begun. 
Each  book  had  to 
be  labeled,  a  pocket 
pasted  in  it  to  hold 
a  card  upon  which 
was  written  the  name  of  the  author  and  title.  By  the 
time  the  shelving  arrived  many  of  the  books  were  ready 
to  be  placed  upon  them  in  proper  order  for  circulation. 

Before  the  library  service  was  fairly  established  in  Camp 
Travis  at  the  main  building  and  at  Y.  M.  C.  A.  and 
Knights  of  Columbus  branches  and  in  company  stations, 
there  came  demands  for  books  at  more  distant  pKjints. 
Camp  Stanley,  twenty-five  miles  and  without  any  books, 
was  provided  for  by  establishing  branches  at  the  three  Y 
buildings  and  the  K.C.  hut.  Brooks  Field  was  then  similarly 
provided  and  was  cared  for  imtil  November  first  when  the 
work  transferred  to  the  Kelly  Field  librarian.  Library 
service  at  Camp  John  Wise  also  pro\'ided  this  building. 
The  nearest  neighbor.  Fort  Sam  Houston,  was  a  part  of 
the  library  system  of  Camp  Travis  with  books  at  the  Gift 
Chapel,  Y  huts  and  barracks. 

The  present  book  collection  now  numbers  over  36,000 
volumes,  composed  of  a  well-rounded  stock  and  especially 
strong  in  mihtary  science,  war  stories,  general  technology 
and  mechanics,  poetry,  history  and  fiction.  Many  of  the 
candidates  for  officers'  training  camps  depended  up)on  the 
library  for  textbooks  upon  mathematics,  historj-  and 
geography.  In  three  days  during  one  of  the  periods  pre- 
vious to  an  examination,  there  were  circulated  from  the 
main  library  building  26t)  books  upon  mathematics  alone. 
Special  schools  conducted  by  the  military  authorities  ujxjn 
military  subjects  were  supplied  with  military  and  technical 


books,  such  as  photography,  gas  defense  and  small  arms. 
The  men  in  the  hospitals  were  also  reached  through 
branches  maintained  at  the  Red  Cross  houses,  each  under 
the  care  of  a  woman  trained  to  meet  the  special  ser\'ice 
that  hospital  patients  need.  With  the  aid  of  a  small  cart 
the  book  lady,  as  she  is  often  called  by  the  patients,  makes 
her  way  among  the  beds,  where  the  soldier  can  select  from 
the  cart  the  book  or  magazine  he  desires.  If  his  choice  is 
not  on  the  cart  the  librarian  takes  his  request  and  the 
book  is  secured  for  him  and  given  to  him  on  the  next  trip. 
There  is  no  service  more  appreciated  than  the  right  book 
in  the  hands  of  a  sick  soldier. 

The  librarian  was  often  consulted  for  information  to 
settle  arguments  or  to  determine  the  winner  where  a  wager 
had  been  made  up)on  disputed  points.     The  officers  who 

bet  the  cigars  over 
the  annual  amount 
of  rainfall  in  Iowa; 
whether  Sidney 
Lanier  was  famous 
enough  to  be  in- 
cluded in  a  study 
of  poetic  Uterature ; 
how  to  pronounce 
"Sarajevo";  how 
the  work  "ukelele" 
is  spelled,  who 
wrote  "Da\nd  Har- 
um,"  why  '"S.  O. 
S."  is  the  code 
word  for  distress, 
are  but  a  few  sam- 
ples of  the  \'aried 
calls  in  the  daily 
duties  of  a  camp  li- 
brarian. The  book 
even  becomes  the 
solution  of  domes- 
tic difficulties,  as  shown  by  the  request  of  a  soldier  who  had 
married  without  an  over-abundance  of  love  on  his  part. 
The  separation  due  to  camp  residence  had  given  him  a 
chance  to  think  it  over.  The  book  "He  Fell  in  Love 
with  his  Wife"  was  provided  after  he  had  asked  for  help. 
The  library  staff  consisted  of  Camp  Librarian  Joseph 
F.  Marron,  of  Duquesne,  Pa.,  assisted  by  Miss  Cornelia 
Johnson,  of  Austin,  Tex.,  Mr.  Paul  B.  Teeter,  of  Chicago, 
and  Mr.  Robert  S.  Fullerton  of  Boston.  Mrs.  Eliza  G. 
Rankin  of  Evanston,  111.,  was  hospital  librarian  at  Camp 
TraNas  and  Mrs.  V.  G.  Humphrey,  of  Ocean  Springs, 
Miss.,  ser%'ed  in  that  capacity  at  Fort  Sam  Houston.  All 
were  expert  librarians. 

As  a  practical  aid  in  military  service  and  civil  pursuits, 
as  a  recreational  center  and  as  an  educational  force,  the 
camp  library  has  been  able  to  proxide  the  book  that  has 
helped  the  soldier  improve  upon  his  "squads  right," 
shoot  straighter  or  fight  better,  help  him  with  his  home 
job,  give  him  a  funny  story  or  a  poem  for  his  idle  hour, 
furnish  the  textbook  for  the  examination  when  he  was 
working  on  a  soldier's  salary  toward  an  officer's  commis- 
sion; or  let  "Private  Peat"  tell  him  how  "The  Ladies 
from  Hell"  went  "Over  the  Top"  "With  Cavalry  in  the 
Great  War"  and  "The  Fighting  Engineers"  and  "Under 
the  German  Shells"  in  "The  Great  Push"  where  "Com- 
rades in  Courage"  brought  about  "The  Winning  of  the 
War"  to  "The  Political  Conditions  of  Allied  Success." 


56 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


UNDER  THE  BLUE  TRIANGLE 

Hostess  House  Brings  About  Many  Delightful  Reunions  of  Soldiers 
and  Kinfolk  and  Friends  From  Distant  Points 


LINKING  the  soldier  at  Camp  Travis  with  his  home- 
folks  by  that  indefinable  charm  of  feminine  influence 
is  the  Hostess  House,  at  once  a  center  of  social 
activity  and  the  "find  me"  focus  of  the  cantonment. 
This  is  the  gathering  place  established  by  the  Y.  W.  C.  A. 
around  whose  ample  galleries  might  be  found  the  boys  and 
their  sweethearts,  the  mothers  and  their  sons,  the  wives 
and  their  husbands,  and  the  materials  for  romances,  many 
of  which  had  their  tender  endings  weeks  after  the  troops 
left  the  Army  and  again  were  engulfed  in  the  varying 
whirlpool  of  civil  life. 

At  once  attractive  in  interior  and  exterior,  the  building 
is  the  sign  of  hospitality  which  brings  the  home  touch  to 
the  homesick  lad  and  gives  a  valuable  aid  to  work  of  the 
other  camp  activities  in  reaching  the  inner  chords  upon 
which  the  morale 
building  of  the  sol- 
dier must  depend. 

What  soldier  of 
Camp  Travis  will 
ever  forget  those 
motherlike  pies 
with  their  tooth- 
some crusts  cov- 
ered with  delicious 
ice  cream,  or  those 
tarts  and  dainties 
which  could  be 
obtained  no  other 
place  in  the  en- 
virons of  the  camp? 
What  lad  of  khaki 
will  not  carry  away 
those  lasting  re- 
membrances of  the 
chicken  fries  which 
brought  back  to 
him  at  crucial  times 

thoughts  of  home?  What  wife,  sweetheart  or  mother,  who 
has  come  to  Camp  Travis  heartsick  and  weary  after  trying 
in  vain  to  locate  her  husband  or  son,  who  mayhap  has 
thoughtlessly  neglected  to  write,  can  fail  to  recall  with 
gratification  and  satisfaction  the  kindly  words  of  the  good 
secretaries  of  the  Hostess  House  as  they  arranged  for  the 
meeting  which  was  to  restore  peace  of  mind?  These  were 
some  of  the  many  services  daily  performed  through  the 
Hostess  House,  the  little,  delicate  things,  all  of  which 
could  have  been  accomplished  only  through  the  contact 
of  femininity. 

Few  structures  of  the  camp  are  more  attractive  and 
there  were  probably  none  of  the  activities  which  was  more 
consistently  made  use  of  in  season  and  out  of  season  than 
this. 

Situated  at  Avenue  B  and  Sixth  Street,  it  presents  a 
front  which  was  at  once  restful  and  homey.  The  hos- 
pitable appearance  of  its  threshold  is  not  belied  as  one 


enters  the  spacious  rece])tion  room,  in  a  corner  of  which  is 
to  be  found  the  enticing  open  fire-place  where  the  crackling 
log  burns  in  dampish  weather.  Around  this  comfortable 
spot  could  be  found  any  cool  evening,  the  groups  of  sol- 
diers and  their  friends,  and  in  the  evenings  of  the  summer 
time  the  chairs  were  thrown  back  and  girls  from  town  with 
their  soldier  admirers  were  permitted  to  dance  and  chatter 
to  their  hearts'  content. 

On  certain  days  there  were  informal  gatherings  where 
programs  of  an  entertaining  nature  were  given,  and 
through  it  all  there  was  an  air  of  quietude  and  restfulness 
which  proved  an  able  adjunct  to  contentment  for  the  sol- 
diers. Reading  rooms  were  also  provided,  but  best  patron- 
ized of  all  was  the  cafeteria.  The  Hostess  House  was 
built  at  the  request  of  Major-General  Henry  T.  Allen, 

commander  of  the 
Ninetieth  Divi- 
sion, who  really  rec- 
ognized the  neces- 
sity  of  a  place 
where  wives,  moth- 
ers or  sweethearts 
might  foregather 
for  rest  and  refresh- 
ment while  await- 
ing the  search  for 
their  husbands, 
sons  and  fiances. 
It  was  opened  in 
November,  1917, 
with  Miss  Lucy 
Moore  as  director; 
Miss  Gertrude 
Keech  as  business 
secretary;  Miss 
June  Mi  liner  as 
cafeteria  director 
and  Mrs.  G.  A. 
Reader,  receiving  hostess  and  information  secretary.  The 
present  staff  consists  of  Mrs.  J.  M.  Ballinger,  director;  Miss 
Keech,  business  secretary;  Miss  Harriet  Means,  informa- 
tion secretary,  and  Miss  Emma  Martin,  cafeteria  director. 
In  this  activity  as  with  the  others  at  the  Camp  the 
division  headquarters  information  bureau  gave  generous 
and  ever-ready  co-operation  and  was  the  means  of  unravel- 
ling many  a  tangled  problem  of  marital  or  family  affairs. 
Aside  from  the  pathos  of  many  cases,  amusing  features 
are  not  infrequent. 

"Be  thankful,  my  dear,  that  you  have  no  husband  these 
perilous  times,"  a  forlorn  looking  woman  advised  the 
hostess,  after  relating  her  troubles  regarding  a  careless 
husband. 

"  But  there  may  be  none  to  have  after  this  war  is  over," 
replied  the  hostess. 

"Why,  honey,  don't  worry,"  consoled  the  visitor,  "you 
won't  have  any  trouble  at  all;  you  can  get  a  cripple." 


1.57; 


3\ 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


FOLLOWING  THE  STAR  OF  ZION 

Promotion  of  Agricultural  Interests  Climax  of  Jewish  Welfare 
Board* s  Service  Among  Camp   Travis  Soldiers 


WITH  a  far-seeing  vision  of  the  soldier's  welfare  after 
reaching  civilian  life,  the  Jewish  Welfare  Board  of 
Camp  Travis  has  been  a  prominent  factor  in  the 
morale  building  of  the  soldier.  This  work  was  adopted 
after  victory  for  the  Allies  had  been  assured  through  the 
armistice,  but  it  was  merely  the  culmination  of  a  successful 
program  which  had  been  conceived  and  executed  by  the 
Jewish  organization  throughout  the  months  that  it  was 
present  in  the  camp.  And  this  work,  though  largely 
serving  their  co-religionists,  was  non-sectarian,  benefitting 
Hebrew  and  Gentile  alike  without  distinction  as  to  sect  or 
creed.  A  specially  striking  feature  was  the  hospital 
visiting  which  was  carried  on  at  all  times. 

The  most  successful  work  of  the  organization  was  the 
agricultural  exhibit  and  intensive  course  in  modem  farming 
carried  on  during  the  middle  of  December  with  the  sanc- 
tion and  approval  of  Brigadier-General  George  H.  Estes. 
Commercial,  federal,  educational  and  progressive  organi- 
zations of  the  state  and  nation  joined  in  commending  this 
achievement,  and  the  press  of  San  Antonio  and  the  state 
at  large  devoted  columns  to  the  success  gained  and  the 
interest  taken  by  the  soldiers  in  the  improved  apparatus 
for  increasing  the  production  of  farms.  Thousands  of  sol- 
diers and  civilians  attended  the  lectures  and  marked  at- 
tention was  given  to  demonstrations  of  breeding  and 
grading  livestock.  The  idea  was  initiated  by  M.  Flax,  of 
Brooklyn,  who  took  charge  of  the  work  in  August,  1918, 


with  his  assistant,  H.  H.  Auerbach,  of  Omaha  and  with  the 
co-operation  of  the  Camp  Publicity  Office. 

Through  the  instrumentality  of  the  San  Antonio  branch, 
social  entertainments  were  made  a  feature  of  the  work  and 
programs  were  provided  at  the  various  welfare  centers  in 
Camp  Travis  and  wholesome  entertainment  for  the  men 
when  they  came  to  the  city  from  Camp.  Upon  the  induc- 
tion of  Nathaniel  Hirsch  into  the  military  service  in 
August,  1918,  Mr.  Flax  assumed  charge  of  the  work  at 
Camp  Travis.  He  was  enabled  to  bring  the  work  closer 
to  the  men  by  estabhshing  headquarters  at  the  various 
Y.  M.  C.  A.  and  K.  of  C.  buildings  throughout  the  camp. 
He  also  placed  his  services  and  those  of  Mr.  Auerbach  at 
the  disjx)sal  of  the  Base  Hospital  and  worked  assiduously 
during  the  influenza  epidemic. 

In  the  early  part  of  November,  George  W.  Rabinoff  of 
Hartford,  Conn.,  was  placed  in  charge  of  the  San  Antonio 
district  for  the  Welfare  Board  and  Abram  C.  Caplan,  of 
Baltimore,  and  I.  H.  Mendelson,  of  Des  Moines,  were 
added  to  the  staff.  By  this  time  the  scope  of  the  work  had 
so  increased  that  it  became  necessary  to  erect  a  building 
and  this  was  done  in  six  days  at  a  site  provided  at  Eighth 
and  Railroad  avenue.  Representatives  of  the  board 
were  also  instnmiental  in  the  promotion  of  the  "khaki 
college"  estabUshed  by  the  Y.  M.  C.  A.,  and  Messrs. 
Caplan  and  Mendelson  were  made  members  of  the 
faculty. 


CARED  FOR  MASONS  IN  KHAKI 

Big  Representation  of  Fraternity  in  Army  Led  to  Unique  Addition 
to  IV elf  are   Organizations  in   Camp 


IF  it  is  a  new  thing  to  see  a  Masonic  welfare  organization 
in  an  army  camp,  it  is  but  a  natural  development 
during  the  present  war.  More  than  a  third  of  the 
members  of  the  Scottish  Rite  societies  of  San  Antonio  are 
in  the  army  at  home  and  abroad.  This  is  true  also  of  the 
other  Masonic  lodges  of  San  Antonio. 

When  war  was  declared  the  Masons  responded  to  the 
call  in  such  numbers  that  it  soon  became  apparent  that  if 
the  fraternity  would  be  of  the  greatest  service  to  its  mem- 
bers a  representative  should  be  stationed  at  Camp  Travis. 
The  Masonic  Welfare  Office  was  built  by  the  Scottish  Rite 
Bodies  of  San  Antonio  and  is  maintained  by  them  and  the 
Alzafar  Shrine  Temple.  The  welfare  work  extends  to 
Masons  of  all  lodges  and  even  to  those  who  are  not  of  the 
fraternity. 


The  Reverend  Lewis  McVea,  who  was  at  the  time  pastor 
of  the  Methodist  Church  at  Bishop,  Texas,  was  elected 
representative,  and  his  office  was  first  estabUshed  in  one  of 
the  Y.  M.  C.  A.  buildings.  With  trains  daily  discharging 
hundreds  of  soldiers  into  the  camp  these  quarters  were 
soon  outgrown  and  more  room  was  soon  needed.  This 
was  obtained  through  Major  General  H.  T.  Allen,  com- 
manding the  Ninetieth  Division. 

From  a  local  welfare  station,  the  office  at  Avenue  B  and 
Sixth  Street  soon  became  the  rendezvous  of  Masons 
throughout  the  country.  Regardless  of  the  nature  of  the 
service  Reverend  McVea  and  his  sister,  Doris  McVea,  his 
assistant,  were  always  at  the  call  of  their  fellows,  whether 
the  service  was  of  a  financial  nature  or  comforting  the 
sick. 


[58] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


-jrtmy  ■'**•  ■■■" 


t^3^Ki 


-  •■-•*HaaaBasaBi 


PICKED  UP  IN  THE  COMPANY  STREET 


THE  "FLU" 

When  your  back  is  broke  and  your  eyes  are  blurred, 
And  your  shin  bones  knock  and  your  tongue  is  furred, 
And  your  tonsils  squeak  and  your  hair  gets  dry, 
And  you're  doggone  sure  you're  going  to  die. 
And  you're  skeered  you  won't  and  afraid  you  will, 
Just  drag  to  bed  and  have  your  chill, 
And  pray  the  Lord  to  see  you  thru — 
For  you've  got  the  flu,  you've  got  the  flu. 

When  your  toes  curl  up  and  your  belt  goes  flat. 
And  you're  twice  as  mean  as  a  Thomas  cat, 
And  life  is  a  long  and  dismal  curse. 
And  your  food  all  tastes  like  a  hard-boiled  hearse, 
When  your  lattice  aches  and  your  head's  a-buzz, 
And  nothing  is  as  it  ever  was, 
Here  are  my  sad  regrets  to  you^ 
You've  got  the  flu,  you've  got  the  flu. 

What  is  it  Uke,  this  Spanish  flu? 
Ask  me,  brother,  for  I've  been  thru. 
It's  misery,  woe  and  black  despair; 
It  pulls  your  teeth  and  curls  your  hair; 
It  thins  your  blood  and  bares  your  bones. 
And  fills  your  craw  with  moans  and  groans, 
And  sometimes,  maybe,  you  get  well; 
Some  call  it  flu, 

I  call  it  hell. 


During  the  night  the  Oflicer  of  the  Day  repeatedly 
crossed  the  post  of  a  colored  sentry  without  being  chal- 
lenged.    Finally  he  made  inquiries. 

"Oh,  you  cain't  fool  me,  boss,"  he  was  told.  "Ah  done 
knows  you  belongs  around  heah." 


Sergeant  (to  recruit,  mahogany  shade) — "Who  told 
you  to  pick  up  those  cigarette  stubs?  " 

"Ah  don'  know,  suh.  He  was  one  of  those  gen'lmen 
with  httle  birds  on  his  shouldahs." 


THE  SUBTLE  COMPLIMENT 

Colored  Private  (after  his  captain  has  administered 
a  sharp  reprimand  for  "gold-bricking") — "Yes,  suh,  Sar- 
gint,  I  suttinly  am  going  to  work." 

Captain— "  What  do  you  mean  by  calling  me  a  ser- 
geant?" 

Colored  Private — "Oh,  I  knows  you  ain't  no  Sargint, 
suh.     I  jus  wanted  to  make  yo'  feel  good." 


ARMY  BRIEFS 

Lieutenant  (quizzing  on  Articles  of  War) — "  What  is  a 
man's  status  when  he  is  apprehended,  after  going  A.  W. 
O.  L.?" 

Veteran  of  Four  Days — "  S.  O.  L." 


FAIR  ENOUGH 

Captain  (to  applicant  for  farm  furlough) — "Jones,  how 
many  acres  of  peanuts  have  you?  " 

"Ten,  Sir." 

"How  many  children?" 

"Five,  Sir." 

"And  how  far  is  the  field  from  the  house?" 

"A  half  mile.  Sir." 

Captain  (after  rapid  calculation)  —  "Just  two  acres 
apiece  and  distance  enough  for  digestion.  The  peanuts 
will  be  gone  before  you  could  get  home.  Go  back  to  the 
kitchen." 


Rookie    (to   his   Captain) — "Say,   mister,   you   were 
pretty  lucky;  where'd  you  manage  to  get  hold  of  those 

shiny  leather  leggins?    .    .     .    Just  look  at  the  d d 

things  they  threw  at  mel' 


Civilian  (after  the  war) — "Wa-al,  Doc,  I'm  sure  you 
treated  all  kinds  of  cases  in  the  army,  but  what  did  you 
have  the  least  of?" 

Major — "Well,  of  course,  our  records  would  show 
exactly,  but  er — while  I  am  not  sure,  I  would — er — I  say, 
I  suppose,  obstetrical." 


[59] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


1918  CAMP  TRAVIS  FOOTBALL  SQUAD 
Pvt.  J.  A.  Barbish,  165th  D.  B.,  End;  Sergt.  E.  F.  Lamb,  86th  Inf.,  Tackle;  Corp.  J.  C.  Nichols,  19th  Inf.,  End;  Capt.  K.  Otey, 
165th  D.  B.,  End;  Pvt.  P.  C.  CofBn,  D.  B.,  End;  Corp.  M.  LeClaire,  85th  Inf.,  Guard;  Pvt.  R.  Brubaker,  86th  Inf.,  Guard;  Pvt.  T.  M. 
Meyer,  19th  Inf.,  Mascot;  Lieut.  W.  Karaszewski,  165th  D.  B.,  Tackle;  Sergt.  D.  L.  Cobb,  19th  Inf.,  Half;  Sergt.  L.  H.  Stevenson, 
165th  D.  B.,  Center;  Lieut.  Miller,  165th  D.  B.,  Quarter;  Corp.  W.  F.  Scripcavage,  259th  Amb.  Co.,  Tackle;  Pvt.  C.  Little,  86th  Inf., 
Guard;  Chap.  G.  Storaasli,  165th  D.  B.,  Center;  Sergt.  C.  Schwarting,  35th  Inf.,  Guard;  Capt.  L.  H.  Patterson,  165th  D.  B.,  Tackle; 
Pvt.  A.  B.  Young,  165th  D.  B.,  End;  Pvt.  H.  A.  Winters,  165th  D.  B.,  Half;  Pvl.  R.  B.  Morton,  19th  Inf.,  Full;  Sergt.  B.  Moody,  165th 
D.  B.,  Half;  Corp.  G.  G.  Birch,  19th  Inf.,  Quarter;  Pvt.  M.  R.  Townsend,  85th  Inf.,  Half;  Pvt.  Berg,  165lh  D.  B.,  End;  Lieut.  W.  J. 
Rogers,  Hdqrs.  Camp  Travis,  End;  Capt.  H.  H.  Hudson,  165th  D.  B.,  Manager;  A.  M.  Venne,  Y.  M.  C.  A.,  33,  Coach;  Capt.  T.  E.  D. 
Hackney,  35th  Inf.,  Coach. 

:6o] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


FOR  SPORT  AND  WAR 

Athletics  is  Big  Factor  for  Recreation  and  Success  in  Battle 


CAMP  TRAVIS  history  has  constantly  carried 
through  its  various  •stages  of  development  an  im- 
portant chapter  of  athletic  activities,  for  each  suc- 
ceeding commander  has  recognized  the  vital  importance  of 
sending  out  soldiers, — for  combat  or  peaceful  pursuits — - 
who  were  physically  fit  for  whatever  was  ahead  of  them. 
Not  alone  has  this  phase  of  camp  life  been  fostered  and 
promoted  in  a  military  manner,  but  the  Y.  M.  C.  A.  and 
the  War  Department  Commission  on  Training  Camp 
Activities  have  taken  hold  in  their  own  way  to  keep  the 
interest  in  sports 
of  all  kinds  alive. 

The  days  follow- 
ing the  signing  of 
the  armistice,  how- 
ever, found  empha- 
sis on  the  athletic 
side  of  camp  ac- 
tivities stronger 
than  at  any  other 
period,  for  with 
training  for  combat 
lightened  athletic 
events  were  de- 
pended on  to  a 
greater  extent  than 
ever  to  keep  the 
minds  of  the  men 
occupied  until  they 
should  be  returned 
to  civil  life.  Regi- 
mental athletic  and 
field  meets,  boxing 
and  wrestling  pro- 
grams, and  the  regular  field  physical  training  were  all 
speeded  up  so  far  as  the  "flu"  and  other  epidemics 
permitted. 

The  big  classic  events  in  the  athletic  world  at  the  end  of 
1918  were  the  football  game  between  Camp  Travis  and 
Kelly  Field,  and  a  three-cornered  boxing  meet  between 
Camp  Travis,  Fort  Sam  Houston  and  Kelly  Field;  these 
being  in  addition  to  two  big  divisional  field  meets.  The 
Thanksgiving  Day  football  game  between  Kelly  Field  and 
Camp  Travis  was  won  by  the  former  by  a  score  of  20  to 
3  after  several  of  the  best  Camp  Travis  players  had  been 
taken  ofT  the  field,  injured.  Coach  A.  M.  Venne,  formerly 
with  Carlisle  Indian  School,  but  later  with  the  Y.  M.  C.  A., 
and  C.  L.  Brewer,  a  former  University  of  Michigan  coach 


and  star,  had  worked  hard  to  build  up  a  winning  team,  but 
the  casualties  were  too  great.  The  three-cornered  boxing 
meet,  held  in  the  middle  of  November  at  the  Camp  Travis 
stadium,  was  also  won  by  the  Kelly  Fielders.  Camp  Travis' 
football  team,  however,  won  from  Te.xas  A.  &  M.  College, 
12  to  7  and  tied  a  no-score  game  with  Camp  McArthur. 
Another  major  event  in  the  November  athletic  calendar 
was  a  big  camp  field  meet,  at  which  Brigadier  General  G. 
H.  Estes  was  honorary  referee,  and  which  attracted  several 
thousand    spectators.      This    meet    was    won    by    the 

Fifty-third  Field 
Artillery,  which 
had  nearly  twice 
the  number  of 
points  which  its 
nearest  competitor 
was  able  to  gather 
in.  To  enable  con- 
testants to  do  them- 
selves more  justice 
in  such  events, 
bo.xers,  wrestlers 
and  track  athletes 
were  excused  from 
part  of  their  duties 
after  the  signing  of 
the  armistice  and 
the  consequent  let- 
up in  training. 

In  August  "fite 
nite"  cards  were 
begun  by  the  mili- 
tary    authorities, 


FOOTb.VLL  SQUAD,  52d  IIELD  ARTILLKKV 


Major  J.  T.  Round- 
tree  having  been  chosen  to  head  an  athletic  council  for  the 
camp,  the  council  including  Y.  M.  C.  A.  and  other  repre- 
sentatives, among  them  being  Johnny  Coulon  and  Bobby 
Burns,  boxers,  and  Budd  Goodwin  as  swimming  instructor. 
Chris  Christiansen  was  official  promoter  of  these  fights. 
Early  in  August,  too,  F.  E.  Dingman,  a  Y.  M.  C.  A. 
specialist  in  training  of  massed  classes  in  boxing  and 
wrestling,  came  to  Camp  Travis  from  Camp  Bowie,  tak- 
ing up  the  mass  system  of  instruction  in  the  Development 
Group  and  the  Fifty-fourth  Field  Artillery. 

During  the  first  week  in  December,  the  last  big  camp 
athletic  meet  was  held  before  the  discharge  of  many  sol- 
diers, and  was  won  by  the  53rd  Field  Artillery,  with  the 
Eighty-fifth  Infantry  a  close  second. 


61 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


y^/v'   /■/./:  eAKN 


/  .o 


'^x 


One  of  those  "Battle  Royals" 


[62] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


MUSINGS  OF  A  DEPOT  BRIGADIER 


GROSSED  rifles  should  not  be  used  in  Depot  Brigade 
insignia;  it  should  be  crossed  fly-swatters  with  a 
typewriter  underneath. 

The  motto  of  the  Depot  Brigade  should  be:  "Peace  on 
earth,  good  will  toward  man." 


The  silver  service  chevrons  would  be  all  right  for  the 
Depot  Brigade,  if  there  were  a  gold  brick  between  the 
angles. 


The  chief  grouch  of  the  Depot  Brigade  ofiicers  is  that  in 
1917  they  volunteered  for  service  in  the  armed  forces  of  the 
United  States. 


The  accident  and  health  insurance  companies  broke  the 
camel's  back  when  they  endeavored  to  write  up  the  officers 
of  the  Depot  Brigade,  considering  them  the  best  risk  of 
any  profession  on  earth. 


The  Huns  have  shown  the  American  people  that  the 
James  Boys  are  entitled  to  an  apology  and  a  monument. 
The  James  Boys  never  harmed  a  woman  or  little  child ;  it 
is  true  that  they  did  some  things  quite  Hunnish,  but  even 
then  they  did  not  claim  that  the  Lord  was  particeps 
criminis. 


We  were  crowded  in  the  D.  B., 
Not  a  soul  would  dare  to  shoot. 
The  war  was  on  in  Europe, 
But  all  we  did  was  s'lute. 


Where  is  your  wandering  boy  to-night?  Safer  than  in 
his  mother's  arms — he  is  in  the  Depot  Brigade,  pounding 
a  typewriter,  wielding  a  fly-swatter  or  explaining  by  in- 
dorsement why  a  button  was  off  Private  Smith's  breeches 
at  the  last  inspection. 


Poles  and  Bohemians  were  numerous  among  the  re- 
cruits, and  such  names  as  Czsertozc  Mjovscek  were  fre- 
quent. The  first  sergeants  had  quite  a  hard  time  of  it  at 
roll-call  at  first,  but  the  problem  was  soon  solved,  although 
by  accident.  A  company  had  faUen  in  for  reveille  when 
out  came  the  first  sergeant,  who  had  a  severe  cold;  as  he 
approached,  he  sneezed,  and  fourteen  men  answered 
"Here." 


When  that  order  came  down,  announcing  that  company 
commanders  were  responsible  for  the  flies  in  their  area,  one 
captain  was  very  much  distressed  because  he  didn't  know 
whether  he  was  responsible  for  the  dead  flies  or  the  live 


It  was  considered  remarkable  that  a  five-minute  sermon 
by  Chaplain  Fisher  could  bring  500  men  to  the  mourner's 
bench ;  it  was  so  considered  until  it  was  learned  that  he  had 
told  them  that  there  was  a  Depot  Brigade  in  Hell,  but  not 
in  Heaven. 


The  enemy's  barrage  had  passed  over  our  trenches,  and 
the  fierce  foe  was  coming  over  the  top.  The  commander 
pressed  the  buzzer-button,  the  adjutant  appeared  and 
the  commander  asked:  "Were  all  the  latrines  in  the  thir- 
ty-third Group  clean  at  midnight?" 

"Perfect,  sir." 

"Were  our  fly-swatter  entanglements,  just  east  of  our 
typewriter  nests,  inspected  before  the  battle  started,  and 
are  the  Forms  88  in  perfect  condition?" 

"Perfect,  sir." 


"  Good;  very  good,"  said  the  commander,  "we  shall  win 
this  battle,  provided  none  of  the  officers  have  slept  out  of 
camp  more  than  two  nights  a  week  for  the  past  nineteen 
months." 


It  was  August  13th,  just  one  month  before  the  great 
drive  at  St.  Mihiel.  The  big  guns  on  both  sides  had  been 
roaring  for  hours,  gigantic  shells  were  bursting  here  and 
there,  blowing  great  holes  in  the  ground  and  throwing 
earth  hundreds  of  feet  in  air.  Zero  hour  was  nearly  at 
hand  and  every  American  was  ready  to  go  over  the  top 
for  the  first  time  in  that  sector. 

Suddenly  the  barrage  lifted,  our  boys  sprang  from  the 
trenches  and  rushed  upon  the  Huns  like  unleashed  tigers, 
driving  them  from  the  first  line,  then  from  the  second  and 
from  the  third.  Then  came  the  order  to  retreat  and  they 
fell  back  to  their  original  position.  At  the  very  moment 
of  victory,  the  General  had  found  that  the  size  of  Private 
Blink's  shoe  was  not  in  his  service  record. 

"It  will  take  us  thirty  days  to  get  that  information  from 
Camp  Travis,"  he  growled;  "we  shall  renew  the  attack 
at  that  time." 


Horace  Kelton  of  San  Antonio  was  one  of  the  men  who 
addressed  soldiers,  about  to  be  discharged,  on  the  subject 
of  insurance,  manhood  and  morality.  When  he  was  ad- 
dressing an  unusually  large  number  of  negroes,  he  asked: 
"  Can  any  man  present  suggest  a  punishment  suf&cient  for 
the  Kaiser?" 

One  big  black  fellow  raised  his  hand  and  said:  "Put  him 
in  the  Depot  Brigade  and  make  him  a  K.  P.  for  life." 
This  outburst  of  inflamed  passion  was  reconsidered,  how- 
ever, and  the  crowd  decided  on  sober  second  thought  that 
a  sentence  in  the  Depot  Brigade  would  be  sufficient  without 
the  K.  P.  penalty. 


RiTLE — Part  of  equipment  for  overseas  troops. 

Form  88 — A  card-board  receipt  to  show  how  badly  doctors 

can  guess. 
Mimeograph — A  combination  of  cannon,  machine  gim  and 

automatic  rifle,  designed  to  keep  company  commanders 

in  close  touch  with  their  typewriters. 
Indorsement — Something  demanded  by  superior  author- 
ity, written  by  the  company  clerk,  signed  by  the  first 

sergeant  (if  he  is  a  good  penman),  carried  by  an 

orderly,  read  by  a  sergeant-major  and  filed  by  a  field 

clerk. 
Officers'  Quarters — A  long,  slim  building  of  wood  and 

paper,  heated  by  steam  in  hot  weather,  and  surrounded 

by  castor  beans. 
Lime — A  white  substance  used  to  paint  rocks  at  times 

when  men  should  be  given  military  training. 
Sergeant  Hill — ^The  only  man  in  miUtary  annals,  who 

never  made  a  mistake. 
Fly-swatter — A  wire  entanglement  designed  to  protect 

companies   against  death,  disease,  destruction   and 

sanitary  inspectors. 
Tactics,  minor — Science  of  handling  two  squads  in  order 

to  get  them  on  the  parade  ground  for  guard-mount. 
Tactics,  major — Science  of  teaching  recruits,  who  have 

only  one  change  of  clothing,  how  to  keep  everything 

spotlessly  clean,  starched  and  pressed  at  all  times. 
Major — The  only  innocent  by-stander  who  is  allowed  to 

interfere  with  a  battalion  adjutant,  and  the  man  who 

discovers  how  many  bars  of  sapwlio  were  purchased  out 

of  the  mess  fund. 


63 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


>..M(*ir   i.^n^«>«-u«v 


CAPTAIN  C.  O.  WOLl-E  AND  CAMP  EXCHANGE  STAFF 


NO  PROFITEERING  MERCHANTS  HERE 

Camp  Exchange  Was  the  Department  Store  of  the  Barrack  City 


To  most  civilians,  before  the  great  war,  the  army  ex- 
change, commonly  called  the  canteen,  was  unknown. 
To  those  who  have  been  in  the  service,  the  canteen 
is  as  much  a  part  of  the  army  as  the  proverbial  beans,  and 
so  wherever  a  body  of  troops  is  found,  whether  regiment, 
battalion  or  detachment,  one  is  apt  to  find  an  exchange. 

For  the  benefit  of  the  uninitiated,  an  exchange  is  simply 
a  store — but  how  different  it  is!  It  is  in  business,  not  for 
profit,  but  solely  to  provide  comforts  for  the  men  it  serves. 
Here  the  men  come  for  smokes,  candy,  drinks,  ice  cream, 
toilet  articles  and  supplies  which  tend  to  promote  that 
personal  cleanliness  and  neatness  so  essential  for  everj' 
good  soldier,  as  well  as  everything  in  wearing  apparel, 
all  of  which  is  sold  at  practically  wholesale  cost. 

When,  in  the  summer  of  1917,  the  huge  task  of  putting 
the  National  Army  cantonments  on  the  map  was  under 
way,  the  War  Department,  realizing  the  services  the  ex- 
changes could  render,  named  the  Post  Exchange  Commit- 
tee a  part  of  the  Commission  on  Training  Camp  Activi- 
ties, the  committee  comprising  broad,  practical  business 
men,  with  Raymond  B.  Fosdick  as  chairman. 

Late  in  August,  1917,  Captain  Hugh  L.  Forman,  Q.  M. 
R.  C,  appeared  at  Camp  Travis  as  division  exchange 
oflicer.  He  was  given  a  crude  office  in  one  end  of  the  old 
offices  of  the  former  Camp  Wilson  staff  at  Avenue  E  and 
Eighth  Street,  his  office  equipment  comprising  a  flat-top 
■desk,  a  knock-down  table,  a  few  folding  chairs,  a  rented 
typewriter,  and  a  civilian  stenographer. 

Initial  stocks  arrived  and  exchanges  began  to  open  up 
in  buildings  especially  erected.  When  the  first  rookies 
arrived,  the  exchanges  were  ready — and  such  business! 
Only  the  rookies  can  tell  of  it.  There  were  nineteen  ex- 
changes, and  the  purchasing  for  and  supervision  of  these 
stores  was  a  big  task,  so  in  October,  Second  Lieutenant 
W.  S.  Fuller,  Q.  M.  C,  was  made  assistant  to  Captain 
Forman.  When  it  is  remembered  that  many  rookies  were 
well-to-do,  it  can  be  realized  that  the  business  would  have 
been  a  nightmare  for  the  manager  of  a  "half-price  sale." 


By  spring,  1918,  the  Ninetieth  Division  being  trained 
sufficiently  for  overseas,  it  became  the  problem  of  the 
exchange  system  to  outfit  the  officers  for  overseas  duty — 
a  tremendous  task.  The  north  end  of  quartermaster 
warehouse  No.  3,  next  to  the  then  Majestic  Theatre,  was 
partitioned  off,  and  on  March  21, 1918,  the  Camp  Officers' 
Exchange  was  begun.  New  purchasing  problems  arose  for 
the  camp  exchange  officer.  Merchandise  was  hard  to  get, 
and  to  obtain  a  stock  including  the  wide  range  of  articles 
needed  was  a  problem  that  led  to  diligent  and  country- 
wide search,  but  manufacturers  and  jobbers  helped,  and 
when  the  Ninetieth  Division  left  Camp  Travis  in  June, 
most  of  the  officers  had  been  satisfactorily  equipped  at  a 
substantial  saving. 

A  wholesale  department  was  added  as  a  clearing  house 
for  all  purchases  by  the  other  exchanges  in  camp.  In  its 
new  capacity,  the  Camp  Exchange  bought  in  carload  lots, 
and  all  exchanges  benefited.  A  camp  exchange  market 
was  opened  adjoining  the  refrigerating  plant  near  the 
camp  laundry,  being  operated  on  the  same  system  as  the 
post  exchanges,  and  leading  to  important  saving  in  prices 
of  meats,  butter  and  eggs  for  officers  and  enlisted  men. 

It  became  necessary  to  create  a  Camp  E.xchange  De- 
tachment. The  enUsted  personnel  numbered  some  forty 
men  with  Sergeant  N.  W.  Embley  as  steward  of  the  retail 
department,  assisted  by  Sergeants  A.  F.  Kessie,  J.  S. 
Whaley,  Corporal  Roy  Longacre  and  Privates  First  Class 
Abe  Fox,  H.  K.  Crowell  and  H.  F.  Kelly.  The  retail 
accounting  was  handled  by  Sergeant  R.  H.  Baxter  and 
Corporal  S.  Byrd.  In  the  wholesale  end,  Sergeant  J.  E. 
Savage  and  Corporal  P.  Barrow  handled  the  books,  Pri- 
vate First  Class  P.  K.  Wathen  doing  the  billing  and  in- 
voicing; while  the  warehouse  was  under  Sergeants  C.  M. 
Martin  and  J.  R.  Moss,  aided  by  Privates  First  Class  J.  S. 
Hopson,  A.  E.  Riedel  and  W.  B.  Goodloe. 

Early  in  December  Captain  Fuller  returned  to  civil  life 
and  Captain  C.  O.  Wolfe  was  called  from  the  Eighth  Ex- 
change, 165th  D.  B.,  to  become  Camp  Exchange  officer. 


64] 


CAMP    TRAVIS    AND    THE     WORLD    WAR 


THEY  GOT  THE  MAIL 


MAIL  CALL  IS  SWEET  MUSIC 

Camp   Travis  Post   Office  Was  a  Military  Model 


WHEN  you  are  a  long,  long  way  from  home,  and  are 
lonesome,  there  is  no  sweeter  music  than  that  call, 
"Mail."  It  brings  promise  of  news  of  home  and 
of  friends.  When  the  Camp  Travis  Post  Office  was  opened, 
Major-General  H.  T.  Allen,  then  commander  of  the 
camp,  called  upon  the  superintendent  and  said  to  him, 
"Mr.  Mabrite,  a  satisfied  man  makes  a  satisfied  soldier, 
and  one  way  to  satisfy  him  is  to  get  his  mail  to 
him."  That  is  what  the  post  office  has  been  attempting 
to  do. 

Whenever  you  see  a  building  in  an  army  camp  that  dis- 
plays a  large  white  flag  with  the  letter  "P"  in  black,  you 
can  mark  it  as  the  institution  next  in  importance  to  the 
mess  hall,  and  the  place  that  brings  home  ties  closer  to 
the  soldier. 

The  first  post  office  in  this  camp  was  established  in  1911 
during  the  army  manoeuvers.  The  next  office  was  opened 
in  1916,  and  occupied  a  small  tent,  six  by  nine  feet  in 
size.  The  business  at  that  time  was  handled  by  one  man, 
the  present  superintendent  of  the  Camp  Travis  office. 
The  present  force  consists  of  about  twenty-seven  clerks, 
and  the  building  occupies  a  space  of  forty  by  one  hun- 
dred and  five  feet  and  is  equipped  with  every  modern 
convenience  for  the  swift  delivery  and  dispatch  of  mails. 
It  wU  probably  interest  the  members  of  this  camp  to 
know  that  the  Camp  Travis  office  has  been  designated 
by  Postmaster  General  Burleson  as  the  model  military 
post  office  in  the  United  States. 

Approximately  thirty  thousand  letters  were  received 
daily  and  delivered  to  the  men,  and  about  twenty-five 
thousand  dispatches  were  sent  to  the  home  folks.  The 
stamp  sales  for  the  past  year  amounted  to  about  1200,000. 

A  military  camp  post  office  differs  from  the  ordinary 


city  office,  in  that  it  has  no  general  delivery  nor  boxes  for 
rent.  Mail  is  not  delivered  direct  to  the  individuals  but 
is  sent  through  the  channels  by  mail  orderlies.  It  is  dif- 
ferent, in  that  a  directory  section,  a  branch  of  the  camp 
statistical  department,  is  attached  with  a  view  of  tracing 
every  misaddressed  letter  and  delivering  it  to  the  man  for 
whom  it  is  intended.  They  might  be  termed  the  mail 
doctors  who  attempt  to  keep  "alive"  letters  that  would 
otherwise  become  dead  mail. 

An  extreme  sample  of  what  the  directory  section  had  to 
contend  with  is  the  following :  A  few  days  ago  a  card  was 
received  addressed  to  "Mr.  John,  Camp  Travis,  Texas," 
and  on  the  other  side  was  this  message,  "Mr.  John, 
please  send  me  your  last  name  as  I  want  to  write  you  a 
letter." 

The  superintendent  is  Edward  Mabrite,  an  employee  of 
the  San  Antonio  Post  Office  since  1910.  The  foreman  of 
the  office  was  E.  O.  Cravens,  also  an  employee  of  the 
San  Antonio  Post  Office  but  assigned  for  duty  at  Camp 
Travis  in  1917.  While  he  had  no  previous  military  ex- 
perience he  conducted  his  part  of  the  work  like  a  veteran. 
The  Eighteenth  Division  mail  unit  assigned  for  instruc- 
tions to  the  camp  post  office  was  in  charge  of  Sergeant 
O.  E.  Sherrill,  formerly  assistant  postmaster  in  Okmulgee, 
Okla.  The  directory  section  was  in  charge  of  Private 
W.  W.  Burke. 

Although  the  camp  post  office  was  a  branch  of  the 
San  Antonio  office,  it  was  practically  an  independent 
branch.  There  was  direct  connection  with  all  trains; 
three  large  army  trucks  being  required  to  transport  the 
mail  to  and  from  the  camp  post  office.  Sergeant  L. 
Stanger  was  in  charge  of  the  transportation  of  mails  for 
the  camp. 


65 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 

Some  General  Impressions — ^And 


Col.  WeVh**-!!!- 


Bri^.  GrenerdI   Estes 
TJ)t  "Boss" 


Lt.  Ccl.  Re</</i'n^Ton 

Division    A  d  j  o  ta  nT 
Hi:>fiaiiie    VVffs  on  Ma  ny  Or^f-rs 


Lt.  Col.  Jordan 
Camp  Sanitary  Im^ntor 
Had  o  Sharp  Eyf   for  Dirty  Q.J.    Cani 


^^ 


Col.  L;trie- 


^^ 

Col    Anderson 
Ht  and  Hi\  Enginttri    Pos«</  1he-  Human  CocTui 
for  "/A«-  Cawero.. 


[66] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


A  Few  Colonels  and  Majors 


ridjor  Wood  .  <?.  /. 

Cnrnt    Htrf    -frem    '0^*''  Thtrt'. 


-^f^ 


Major  Johm  ,0.0. 

(fhe-OO.mtanino  OrJnanic-     . 
Dtpartrntnt  —  no'^  ShirTi) 


Brig,  (jentral  Shaw 

wa;>    once   a    8o<.l\  PnVate- 


tlojor     /.eon  ore/ 
Ijsued     Pi f lei    to    Pooki'es 


i-t.fo/.    Hoffn^An,    GmpOtl. 
5o/</  OS  Many   </rocerit4     jorf  'Noftoni 


Oi'i^ision   Judge-    Ad vocit^- 
The-    orTi'it   <aL/ohi'  him    in 
-tht-    fioiiTi'an  of  a    Lan^y^'" 


:67] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


MY   F£^T 


Just  in  from  BULLIS 


[68] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


^     f  # 


^^  .JP^ 


The 
Eighteenth  (Cactus)  Division 

Organized  at  Camp  Travis 
August,  1918 

Brigadier  General  George  H.  Estes,  Commanding 

Colonel  Alexander   M.   Wetherill,  Chief  of  Staff 

Colonel    Arthur    M.    Shipp,    Commanding    35th 
Infantry  Brigade,  Acting 

Brigadier  General  Frederick  B.  Shaw,  Commanding 
36th  Infantry  Brigade 

Brigadier  General  Raymond  W.  Briggs,  Command- 
ing 18th  Field  Artillery  Brigade 


69] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


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CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


THE  CACTUS  DIVISION 


THE  story  of  the  Cactus  Division  is  not  a  tale  of 
blasted  hopes,  nor  of  work  that  went  for  naught. 
The  energy,   the   enthusiasm   that   went   into   its 
organization  and  training  when  hojies  were  high  for  ser- 
vice overseas,  were  not  dissipated  when  the  Hun  signed 
the  armistice  and  signified  that  he  had  had  enough. 

Rapidly  as  the  division  was  formed,  there  was  yet  time 
for  the  growth  of  a  splendid  spirit  among  officers  and  men. 
This  spirit  resisted  the  bitter  disapixsintment  of  the  armis- 
tice and  even  developed  after  that  memorable  November 
day.  Training  continued,  plans  matured,  organization 
was  perfected  as  for  active  service,  even  as  the  Allied 
armies  marched  peacefully  across  the  Rhine. 

So,  by  their  bearing  under  disappointment  and  adver- 
sity, did  the  men  and  officers  of 
the  Eighteenth  Division  show  their 
discipline,  their  pride,  their  under- 
standing of  the  character  of  the 
good  soldier.  It  is  difficult  to  fight 
creditably  in  the  face  of  modern 
weapons;  but  it  is  equally  difficult 
to  lose  the  opportunity  to  fight — 
and  lose  it  with  good  grace.  This 
was  the  great  achievement  of  the 
Cactus  Division. 

The  organization  of  the  Eigh- 
teenth Division  was  directed  by 
War  Department  letter  dated  July 
31,  1918,  and  its  formation  was 
begun  August  21, 1918,  by  Colonel 
Alexander  M.  Wetherill,  chief  of 
staff.  Colonel  Wetherill  is  a  regular 
army  man,  a  graduate  of  West 
Point.  His  first  assignment  was  to 
the  Sixth  Infantry,  in  which  his 
father  had  served  as  major  during 
the  Spanish-American  war.  His 
service  covers  the  Moro  campaign 
in  the  Philippine  insurrection  and 
with  General  Pershing  in  his  ex- 
pedition against  Villa.  At  the 
outbreak  of  the  war  he  was  made 
lieutenant-colonel  of  the  first  negro 
draft  regiment  organized  at  Camp 
Gordon,  Ga.  Later  he  was  executive  officer  at  Camp 
Gordon. 

The  first  unit  to  join  the  division  was  the  Nineteenth 
Infantry,  one  of  the  most  famous  regiments  in  the  Regular 
Army,  with  a  battle  history  that  threads  its  way  back 
through  the  years  of  the  Spanish-American  war,  Indian 
wars,  the  War  of  the  Rebellion  to  the  days  of  1812.  It 
will  always  be  regretted  by  army  men,  whatever  regiment 
may  be  closest  to  their  hearts,  that  the  old  Nineteenth 
could  not  write  more  history  on  her  standards  along  the 
battle  front  in  France. 

By  transferring  approximately  five  hundred  men  from 
the  Nineteenth  as  a  nucleus,  and  adding  approximately  a 
thousand  recruits  during  September,  the  Eighty-fifty 
Infantry  was  formed.  These  two  regiments  and  the 
Fifty-third  Machine  Gun  Battalion  formed  the  Thirty- 
fifth  Infantry  Brigade,  commanded  by  Brigadier-General 
George  H.  Estes. 

The  Thirty-sixth  Infantry  Brigade,  commanded  by 
Brigadier-General  Frederick  B.  Shaw,  was  formed  by  the 
Thirty-fifth  and  Eighty-sixth  Infantry  and  the  Fifty- 
fourth  Machine  Gun  Battalion.  The  latter  regiment  was 
organized,  as  was  the  Eighty-fifth,  by  the  transfer  of  a 
training  cadre  from  the  Thirty-fifth  Infantry,  one  of  the 
infant  regiments  of  the  Regular  Army. 


Alexander  M 
Col.,  Chief- 


Those  late  August  and  early  September  days  which  saw 
the  Yankee  colors  sweeping  forward  in  France,  were  busy 
days  for  the  Eighteenth  Division.  Units  joined  daily, 
training  proceeded  steadily  and  enthusiastically  with  ser- 
vice abroad  as  a  nearing  goal.  Three  National  Army 
Cavalry  regiments,  the  303rd,  304th  and  305th,  were  con- 
verted into  artillery  regiments  at  Leon  Springs,  Texas, 
forming  the  Fifty-second,  Fifty-third  and  Fifty-fourth 
Artillery  and  the  Eighteenth  Trench  Mortar  Battery. 
These  organizations,  composing  the  Eighteenth  Field 
Artillery  Brigade,  were  transferred  to  Camp  Travis  and 
the  division  in  August.  Colonel  Thomas  E.  Merrill,  F.  A., 
commanded  the  brigade  until  October  2G,  1918,  at  which 
time  Brigadier-General  Raymond  W.  Briggs  took  command. 
Organization  of  the  218th  En- 
gineers was  effected  at  Camp  Hum- 
phrey, Va.,  early  in  October,  and 
after  a  month's  training  the  regi- 
ment, under  command  of  Colonel 
W.  D.  A.  Anderson,  C.  E.,  was 
ordered  to  Cam])  Travis  and  the 
division.  From  a  nucleus  of  officers 
and  enlisted  men  from  the  Army 
Service  Schools  at  Fort  Leaven- 
worth, Kansas,  the  Radio  Me- 
chanics School  at  College  Station, 
Texas,  and  the  Signal  Corps  Train- 
ing Camp,  Leon  Springs,  the  218th 
Field  Signal  Battalion  was  formed 
at  Camp  Travis  early  in  September. 
Major  Edward  A.  Olson,  S.  C, 
commanded  the  battalion  since  its 
organization. 

The  divisional  trains  were  formed 
from  personnel  transferred  from 
various  specialist  training  centers 
and  arsenals.  The  units  compnising 
the  Eighteenth  Train  Headquarters 
and  Military  Police  were:  Eigh- 
teenth Ammunition  Train,  Eigh- 
teenth Supply  Train,  218th  En- 
Wetherill  gineer  Train,  Field  Hospitals  Nos. 

.of-Staff  269,   270,    271,    272;    Ambulance 

Companies  Nos.  269,  270,  271,  272; 
Sanitary  Squads  Nos.  103,  104,  and  Third  Mobile  Ord- 
nance Repair  Shop.  Colonel  Arthur  M.  Shipp,  the  first 
commander,  was  relieved  by  Colonel  John  J.  Miller,  when 
the  former  was  transferred  to  the  Nineteenth  Infantry. 
The  Eighteenth  Headquarters  Troop,  Fifty-second  Ma- 
chine Gun  Battalion,  Mail  Detachment,  Pigeon  Detach- 
ment and  Photographic  Detachment  were  divisional  head- 
quarters organizations.  Bakery  Company  No.  375  was 
attached  to  the  division  in  October. 

Colonel  James  H.  Frier,  Thirty-fifth  Infantry,  was  the 
first  commander  of  the  Eighteenth  Division.  He  was 
relieved  by  Brigadier-General  George  H.  Estes,  who 
arrived  September  16,  1918,  and  has  since  been  in  com- 
mand of  the  division.  Under  General  Estes  the  skeleton 
units  became  living,  growing  bodies;  the  division  became  a 
cohesive  unit;  the  fighting  spirit,  always  present,  grew 
until  officers  and  men  felt  that  when  the  Cactus  Division 
struck,  the  war  correspondents  would  find  a  new  theme 
for  the  glorification  of  American  arms. 

Then  the  armistice  came.  Only  those  who  have  worked 
with  the  earnestness  of  the  men  of  the  Cactus  Division 
can  understand  their  disappointment.  None  better  than 
they  who  waited  and  worked  and  finally  saw  the  prize  of  ser- 
vice overseas  slip  from  their  hands,  know  the  full  meaning 
of  the  "unquestioned  obedience"  of  the  soldier's  code. 


71 


CAMP    TRAVIS     AND    THE     WORLD    WAR 


172] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


COL.  SHIPP  AND  STAFF— 35th  INFANTRY  BRIGADE 
Left  to  Right 
Capt.  Franz  G.  Edwards,  Adjutant 
Co).  Arthur  M.  Shipp,  Acting  Commander 
2d  Lieut.  Henry  J.  Morgan,  Aide  De  Camp 


ENLISTED  PERSONNEL-35th  INFANTRY  BRIGADE 

[73] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


NINETEENTH  INFANTRY 

Its  Traditions  Go  Back  to  the  War  of  1812 


^  r^HE  Nineteenth  Infantry  is  one  of  the  oldest  regiments 
I  of  the  Army,  ha\-ing  been  organized  in  1812  when 
Congress  authorized  an  increase  in  the  military 
establishment  in  order  to  carry  on  the  war  with  England. 
The  regiment  has  a  splendid  record  for  service,  well  and 
thoroughly  performed  in  every  emergency  from  the  time 

of  its  organization  to 
date,  with  the  exception 
of  the  Mexican  War  of 
1846.  At  that  time  the 
Nineteenth,  having  been 
consolidated  with  other 
regiments  after  the  War 
of  1812,  formed  part  of 
what  has  been  called  the 
"sleeping  forces."  Dur- 
ing the  brief  period  of  its 
existence  the  original 
Nineteenth  developed  a 
regimental  spirit  which, 
having  lived  through  the 
many  years  during  which 
the  regiment  was  temporarily  out  of  existence,  came  forth 
again  with  the  reorganization  at  the  outbreak  of  the  Civil 
War.  To-day  that  same  spirit  lives  in  the  great  organiza- 
tion that  is  forever  preparing  for  the  next  opportunity  to 
live  up  to  its  old  traditions  and  to  add  another  chapter  to 
its  history  in  keeping  with  those  of  the  past. 

During  the  War  of  1812  the  principal  battles  in  which 
the  regiment  was  engaged  were  the  attack  upon  Fort 
Mackinac,  and  the  battles  of  Niagara  and  Fort  Erie.  In 
the  latter  engagement  Major  William  A.  Trimble,  Nine- 
teenth Infantry,  made  a  sortie  from  the  fort  with  a  small 
number  of  men,  which  had  a  splendid  effect,  dislodging  a 
large  force  and  putting  an  end  to  the  attack.  Another 
who  deser\'es  mention  is  Capt.  Isaac  Van  Horn,  Jr.,  of 
Ohio,  who  was  killed  while  leading  members  of  the  Old 
Nineteenth  in  a  most  daring  attack  upon  Fort  Mackinac, 
Michigan,  August  4,  1814. 

During  our  Civil  War  the  regiment  performed  services 
that  were  imexcelled  if,  indeed,  equalled  by  any  other 
regiment.  Though  to  a  great  extent  scattered  throughout 
the  different  army  corps,  their  sacrifices  and  deprivations 
were  many  and  the  regimental  history  for  that  period, 
which  would  constitute  a  volume,  is  engrafted  upon  that 
of  the  nation. 

The  following  reference  to  the  battle  of  Chickamauga 
contained  in  notes  on  file  in  regimental  headquarters,  de- 
scribes an  incident  typical  of  the  regiment's  splendid  ser- 
vice. "On  the  19th  and  20th  of  September,  1863,  the 
First  Battalion,  Nineteenth  Infantry,  aggregating  fourteen 
officers  and  185  enlisted  men  and  commanded  by  Major 
Dawson  were  engaged  in  the  battle  of  Chickamauga.  The 
first  day  Major  Dawson  was  wounded  and  sLxty-six  men 
were  killed  or  wounded.  Capt.  E.  L.  Smith,  a  gallant  and 
accomplished  officer,  then  assumed  command  and  was 
subsequently  captured.  At  the  end  of  the  second  day's 
fighting,  during  which  the  regiment  was  constantly  en- 
gaged and  had  lost  heavily,  a  second  lieutenant  was  in 
command,  reporting  four  officers  and  fifty-one  men  for 
duty." 

At  the  outbreak  of  the  Spanish-American  War  the 
Nineteenth  was  one  of  the  first  regiments  to  move  at  the 


call  of  an  insistent  nation  stirred  to  the  profoundest 
depths  by  the  catastrophe  of  the  Maine  and  the  death  of 
Sigsbee's  men.  They  embarked  for  Porto  Rico  on  July 
21,  1898,  and  remained  there  a  year,  performing  their 
duties  with  that  characteristic  thoroughjiess  which  from 
its  birth  to  the  present  day  has  distinguished  the  work  of 
the  Nineteenth  Infantrj'. 

During  the  campaign  against  the  insurgents  of  the 
Philippine  Islands,  in  the  days  that  followed,  the  regiment 
was  ever  active  and  participated  in  many  important  en- 
gagements, including  the  Battles  of  Sudlon  and  Cebu,  and 
the  attack  and  capture  of  the  Cottas  of  Mount  Bud-Dajo. 
In  the  latter  engagement,  that  part  of  the  regiment  present 
was  commanded  by  Colonel,  then  Captain,  Wetherill, 
present  chief-of-staff  of  the  Cactus  Division.  Colonel 
Cecil,  who  commands  the  Eighty-fifth  Infantry  of  this 
division,  then  a  lieutenant  of  the  Nineteenth,  for  the  ser- 
vice he  performed  there  was  decorated  with  the  Medal  of 
Honor. 

The  regiment,  as  a  part  of  the  Fifth  Brigade,  Second 
Division,  embarked  on  April  23, 1914,  for  Vera  Cruz,  where 
it  remained  throughout  the  occupation,  returning  to  the 
States  November  27th  of  the  same  year.  The  Galveston 
flood  of  August  16,  1915,  completely  destroyed  its  camp 
and  much  property  and  personal  belongings  were  lost, 
whereupwn  the  regiment  was  moved  to  Fort  Sam  Houston, 
Texas.  From  then  until  the  organization  of  the  Eigh- 
teenth Division,  the  Nineteenth  performed  guard  duty  for 
the  most  part. 

Keen  disappointment  was  of  course  felt  throughout  the 
regiment  when  it  was  realized  that  the  Nineteenth  could 
play  no  part  upon  the  fighting  front  in  France,  but  some 
compensation  came  from  the  knowledge  that  practically 
every  officer  and  man  of  the  regiment,  as  it  had  existed 
prior  to  the  war,  went  to  the  front  with  other  organizations 
and  conducted  themselves  most  creditably. 

Col.  Arthur  Morson  Shipp,  commander  of  the  Nine- 
teenth Infantry,  received  his  early  military  training  at 
Virginia  Military  Institute.  He  received  his  appointment 
as  a  second  lieutenant  of  infantry  April  10,  1899,  and  was 
assigned  to  the  Twentieth  Infantry.  He  served  in  the 
Philippines  during  the  in- 
surrection of  1899-1902, 
and  commanded  a  company 
in  the  Mexican  Punitive 
Expedition.  He  was  in- 
spector instructor  of  the 
Virginia  miUtia  and  mus- 
tered it  in  for  border  service 
in  1916.  He  was  promoted 
major  June  4,  1917,  lieu- 
tenant-colonel in  August 
of  the  same  year,  and 
received  his  appointment 
as  full  colonel  July  30, 1918. 
He  was  first  assigned  to  the 
Eighteenth  Division  as 
commanding  officer  of  the  Headquarters  Trains  and 
Military  Police,  and  was  transferred  to  the  Nineteenth 
Infantry  shortly  before  the  armistice  was  signed. 


Note. — The  First  Battalion  is  stationed  along  the  border 
and  does  not  appear  in  the  company  roster  which  follows. 


[74] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


I 


COL.  SHIPP  AND  STAFF,  19th  INFANTRY 

Seated — left  to  right 
Capt.  Hans  Ottzenn  Maj.  O.  D.  Bodenhamer  Col.  A.  M.  Shipp         Capt.  Harer         Capt.  G.  A.  Memay 

Standing — left  to  right 
1st  Lieut.  M.  G.  Belding  Capt.  G.  M.  Bell  Chaplain  F.  C.  Sager  1st  Lieut.  G.  S.  Eyster 


[75] 


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SUPPLY  COMPANY.  19th  INFANTRY 
Captain  Hans  Ottzenn      1st  Lieut.  .Man  Erienborn     1st  Lieut.  Leslie  M.  Skerry      1st  Lieut.  James  W.  Darr    2d  Lieut.  Harry  Reichelderfer 


Regimental  Supply  Sergeants 
Robert  Abercrombie 
Mervyn  Brady 
John  G.  Hayden 

First  Sergeant 
Charles  Fordyce 

Supply  Sergeants 
Louis  Nonnand 
.Arthur  H.  Koestner 
Wilbert  T.  Henry 
Joseph  A.  Bridges 

Stable  Sergeant 
George  Hamilton 

Sergeants 
Joseph  Goyette 
WiUiam  D.  Jones 

Corporals 
Vernon  E.  Smith 
Roland  A.  Earle 
Harr>'  W.  Hindahl 
Charlie  G.  Russell 
Edward  Zim 

Cooks 
Joseph  M.  Bower 
Athanasius  J.  Cassavetes 
Frank  J.  Hollaender 
John  O.  Johnson 
Herman  J.  Letzelter 
John  C.  Ludolph 
Charles  B.  Trim 


Saddlers 
Horace  G.  Brown 
Curtis  H.  McCall 

Horseshoers 
Richard  L.  Hasty 
James  E.  Johnson 
Roy  B.  Morton 
Pete  Sullivan 
Vane  V.  Workman 

Mechanics 
Stanislaw  Kossokoski 
Jack  H.  Reed 
Bee  Sparkman 
Ben  F.  Tinsley 
Fred  R.  Wood 

Wagoners 
Chester  A.  Adams 
Ralph  C.  Adkinson 
Ivan  T.  Amett 
William  Bahm 
.\rthur  J.  Barry 
Walter  Bazilo 
Leo  Benne 
James  O.  Blair 
Walter  E.  Bradbury 
WUUam  C.  Bruce 
Edgar  O.  Brunner 
Carl  C.  Bumes 
Harry  T.  Charlier 
Jakubec  Cipvian 
Harry  B.  Conkhn 
Clay  H.  Drenon 
Mbeit  F.  EUer 
Samuel  H.  Ellis 


Thomas  Gikoy 
Harry  Gipson 
Bill  H.  Goodwin 
CharUe  M.  Grover 
Wilbur  W.  Hawkins 
Mirl  G.  Hendon 
Delbert  D.  Hull 
Edgar  Jolly 
Sam  Kemp 
Carroll  R.  Kenney 
William  Koslowsky 
Ale.xander  G.  Lacy 
Frederick  Lane 
Lee  Land 
Noah  C.  Lawson 
John  Lezynski 
George  V.  Linderman 
Loyd  Lockard 
Ra>Tnond  R.  McDaniel 
Paul  Meyer 
Marin  Moreno 
Clyde  Morrison 
WilKam  E.  Naecker 
Severo  Najar 
Leonard  Nalley 
Frank  Patterson 
Joseph  Pere 
Mike  P.  Perez 
James  L.  Phillips 
Earl  Price 
Myron  Prosser 
George  E.  Prugh 
Ferdinand  Rau 
Thomas  D.  Robinson 
Alfred  C.  Salton 
Clyde  C.  Sayers 


Charles  L.  Shaddox 
Daniel  D.  Shattuck 
Benford  R.  Shepard 
Samuel  L.  Skinner 
Richard  S.  Strickland 
Robert  Stubbs 
Claud  Tarvin 
Jessie  W.  Taylor 
Louis  Taylor 
Jesse  C.  Thomas 
Robert  Thornton 
Arley  Tinsley 
Charles  C.  Tyler 
Loren  Turner 
William  Waddle 
James  A.  Waldrum 
Fred  Welde 
Gary  E.  WeUs 
Robert  Williams 
Thomas  R.  Williams 
Eari  WUton 
John  Wirgo 
Frank  E.  Wheeler 
Edward  R.  Wombacher 
Frank  B.  Woodward 

Privates — First  Clas." 
George  C.  Arim 
Clifford  Carlisle 
Buster  Causey 
Harold  J.  Johnson 
Rufus  D.  Raines 
Frank  D.  Scruggs 
Grant  Smothers 
Dick  D.  Swartz 
Forrest  B.  Williams 


Privates 

Roy  E.  Bookout 
Daniel  W.  Freeman 
WiUiam  Griffion 
Walter  G.  Hopkins 
Edward  Hutchinson 
Niels  C.  Jensen 
Alfred  L.  Keenum 
Earl  Lanphear 
Frederick  A.  Lincoln 
WiUiam  T.  Lowry 
Tresmon  Miller 
Reuben  F.  K.  Moore 
Donald  D.  Stambaugh 
Charles  T.  Stinnett 
Thomas  C.  Sumner 
Emil  E.  Widle 
William  D.  Willis 


Ordnance  Detachment 
19th  Infantry 

Sergeant 
John  W.  Outlaw 

Privates — First  Class 

John  J.  Cheslock 
William  C.  Perry 

Privates 

Joseph  Baranski 
Ben  Tomlin 
Irvin  R.  VoUrath 


[78] 


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■f  ^.    * 


MEDICAL  DETACHMENT,  19th  INFANTRY 


Major  C.  E.  Drake,  M.C. 

Sergeant — First  Class,  Philip  Bedore  Sergeant — First  Class,  Homer  B.  Wright 

Sergeant,  Louis  H.  Kiefer 


Privates — First  Class 
Henry  M.  Heath  Edmund  \V.  Kretschme'r 

William  H.  Hosford  Hester  B.  Martin 

Clarence  E.  Johnson  Henry  W.  Sikyta 

Paul  J.  Keleher  Jay  T.  Wantland 


Privates 
Arthur  J.  Burns 
Josef  Keiznar 
Jobie  D.  Myers 
Carrolton  Pendergraft 


[87] 


CAMP    TRAVIS    AND    THE    WORLD     WAR 


EIGHTY -FIFTH  INFANTRY 

Its  Motto  and  Custom  is  '^Let*s  Go" 


REGARDLESS  of  what  the  future  may  hold  for  the 
Eighty-fifth  Infantrj%  its  officers  and  men  beUeve 
that  the  record  of  a  few  months  has  established  its 
reputation  as  one  of  the  most  efficient  and  rapidly  formed 
organizations  that  ever  trained  fC  kill  the  Hun. 

Although  the  regiment  was  officially  created  some  weeks 

earlier,  it  was  not  until 
September  2,  1918,  that 
it  was  really  bom.  On 
that  date  some  588  men 
were  mobilized  through 
the  transfer  of  privates 
and  non-commissioned 
officers  from  the  Nine- 
teenth Infantry. 

Col.  Josephus  S.  Cecil, 
commanding  the  Eigity- 
fifth  Infantry,  holds  the 
rare  decoration,  the 
Medal  of  Honor,  awarded 
■for  gallantry  and  dis- 
tinguished service  in  the 
attack  upon  and  capture  of  the  Cottas  of  Mount  Bud- 
Dajo,  while  serving  as  a  lieutenant  in  the  Nineteenth  In- 
fantry. Captain  Wilbert  McDonald,  of  the  Supply  Com- 
pany, was  awarded  the  Certificate  of  Merit  for  distin- 
guished service  as  a  sergeant  in  the  same  engagement. 

Capt.  Fred  W.  Adams,  commanding  Company  M,  was 
awarded  the  Distinguished  Service  Cross  for  gallantry  in 
action  during  the  late  war.  In  action  near  Soissons,  July 
22,  1918,  Captain  Adams,  then  a  lieutenant  attached  to 
the  Sixteenth  Infantry,  distinguished  himself  by  his  cour- 
age, judgment  and  leadership.  "After  the  strength  of  the 
regiment  had  been  seriously  reduced  by  losses,"  states  the 
War  Department  citation,  "Lieutenant  Adams  took  com- 
mand of  a  large  niunber  of  remaining  troops,  disposed 
them  in  effective  jwsitions,  walking  up  and  down  the  lines 
under  constant  fire  from  the  enemy,  and  by  his  example  of 
coolness  and  bravery,  inspired  his  men  to  hold  the  position 
they  had  gained." 

Diligently  as  the  men  of  the  Eighty-fifth  have  pursued 
their  training  course,  they  never  have  been  subjected  to  a 
program  of  all  work  and  no  play.  Under  the  direction  of 
Capt.  George  A.  McCallum,  regimental  athletic  organiza- 
tions were  perfected  with  the  result  that  many  star 
athletes  were  discovered  and  develof)ed,  and  high  honors 


were  won.  In  a  track  meet  held  on  November  9th,  in 
which  all  organizations  of  Camp  Travis  participated,  the 
Eighty-fifth  won  third  place.  recei%dng  first  place  in  the 
tug  of  war;  second  place  in  medicine  ball  relay;  and  third 
place  in  the  440-yard  dash  and  the  880-yard  relay.  In 
the  second  track  meet  of  the  season  on  November  30th, 
the  Eighty-fifth  won  second  place.  Although  the  regi- 
ment possesses  considerable  baseball  and  football  talent 
the  athletic  activities  were  confined  strictly  to  track 
work. 

The  Eighty-fifth  Infantry  was  one  of  the  first  regiments 
to  take  advantage  of  the  authorized  method  of  indi\-idual 
induction  for  assignment  tO'  the  regimental  band.  Mu- 
sicians were  sought  in  all  parts  of  the  country,  and  many 
band  leaders  co-operated  with  the  regimental  officers  in 
obtaining  the  desired  talent. 

A  regimental  club  was  organized  early  in  the  history  of 
the  Eighty-fifth.  Honorary  presidency  was  conferred 
upon  Colonel  Cecil,  and  Lieutenant  Colonel  John  McE. 
Pruyn  was  elected  president.  A  club  house  was  provided 
in  a  building  at  the  corner  of  Avenue  D  and  Third  Street, 
formerly  used  as  a  regimental  school,  and  after  furnishers 
and  interior  decorators  had  finished  social  functions  were 
held  as  regularly  as  duty  permitted. 

When  the  Eighteenth 
Division  was  named  the 
Cactus  Division,  the  Eighty- 
fifth  promptly  planted  splen- 
did specimens  of  the  cactus 
plant  in  front  of  the  Officers' 
Club  and  elsewhere  in  the 
regimental  area.  At  the 
suggestion  of  Colonel  Cecil 
scores  of  the  prickly  plants 
were  transferred  to  the  ter- 
races along  Avenue  D ,  where 
they  will  remain,  perhaps, 
to  remind  visitors  of  the 
Cactus  Division  long  after 
its  demobilization. 

The  regimental  motto  is  "Let's  Go,"  and  that  has  been 
the  regimental  spirit  since  its  birth.  The  excellent 
showing  of  the  men  in  a  parade  early  in  September, 
shortly  after  thej-  had  entered  the  service,  won  special 
commendation  from  Brig.-Gen.  George  H.  Estes,  com- 
manding the  division. 


^ 


V 


[881 


CAMP    TRAVIS     AND    THE    WORLD    WAR 


COLONEL  CECIL  AND  STAFF,  85th  INFANTRY 


Left  to  right — seated 
Capt.  A.  J.  Stark  Major  C.  S.  Price 

Major  Arthur  Casey  Major  W.  A.  Ellis 

Lieut.-Col.  J.  McE.  Pruyn  Major  J.  M.  Watkins 

Col.  J.  S.  Cecil 


Second  row- 
Major  J.  F.  Dunshie,  M.  C. 
1st  Lieut.  H.  H.  Thames 
Capt.  M.  D.  McAllister 
1st  Lieut.  W.  Brown 


-standing 

Capt.  G.  Child 
1st  Lieut.  W.  A.  Rounds 
Capt.  W.  G.  Hodge 
Capt.  W.  McDonald 


Last  row— standing 
Capt.  F.  H.  Martin,  M.  C.  Chaplain  Ray  M.  Camp 

1st  Lieut.  E.  F.  G.  Thacker,  M.  C.  2nd  Lieut.  C.  Thomas 


[89 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


-- »■■  —--r 


1st  Lieut.  R.  A.  Gibson 

Sergeant  Majors 
Jolin  N.  Stipe 
Harry  C.  Ard 
Howard  M.  Warner 
Herman  Goodwin 
Joseph  W.  Shepherd 

Color  Sergeants 
Delia  Stamper 
John  L.  Lane 

Sergeants 
Ulysses  S.  Newport  (1st  Sergt.) 
Steven  Pasternacki  (Chief  Mus.) 
Frank  A.  Sebukaty 
Robert  W.  Reynolds 
George  W.  Robinson 
Ernest  A.  Johnson 
Wm.  M.  Hallibutton 
James  A.  Weeks 
Jasper  W.  Blount 
Edward  L.  Wall 
Henry  L.  Chapek 
Harold  G.  Welborn 
Charles  C.  Marsh  (Sup.  Sgt.) 
Jodie  E.  McCord  (Mess  Sgt.) 
Elias  U.  Gamble  (Stable  Sgt.) 
Thomas  E.  Bletcher 
Donald  N.  Shepherd 


HEADQUARTERS   COMPANY,   Soth   INFANTRY 

Captain  H.  Leachman 
1st  Lieut.  Chas.  M.  Withrow  2nd  Lieut.  Wiley  L.  Elliott 


2nd  Lieut.  Henry  T.  Crossen 


Corporals 
Wilson  W.  Loper 
Henry  H.  Wynne,  Jr. 
Tommie  K.  Panties 
George  E.  Leverton 
John  O.  Eldridge 
Alexander  Zreamby 
Lee  J.  McDonald 
Charb'e  W.  Boyens 
William  L.  Gilson 
Clarence  H.  Kerr 
Irva  J.  Black 
John  Ronan 
Edward  E.  Sperry 
Lohr  G.  Brill 
Claude  L.  Lindley 
Raymond  Banazik 
George  Wilt 

Musicians — First  Class 
Frank  W.  Barth 
Peter  T.  Henrikson 
Lyndell  H.  Walthall 

Musicians — Second  Class 
Walter  C.  Allen 
Walter  W.  Arkebauer 
William  W.  Cook 
Henry  .\.  Kuzel 


Musicians — Third  Class 
John  H.  Anderson 
Albert  C.  Camp 
Murlin  B.  Leeper 
Shellie  F.  Martin 
James  W.  Prather 
Emil  E.  Rapstine 
George  E.  Rice 
Sydney  Rosen 
Joe  F.  Schott 
John  F.  Starry 
Gust  Tsesmelis 

Horseshoer 
Ludvik  J.  Snokehouse 

Mechanics 
Roscoe  Leslie 
John  G.  Word 

Privates — First  Class 
Fred  Clark 
Paul  Estock 
Russell  V.  Goble 
Barnett  Lanesman 

Privates 
Eugenio  Aguerro 
Juan  Alarid 
Richard  E.  .Mien 


Henry  H.  Almon 
Benjiman  A.  Baldwin 
Charlie  T.  Bell 
Fred  O.  Bennett 
Bryan  T.  Billups 
Kerby  Black 
William  E.  Black 
Roy  L.  Bowles 
Charlie  C.  Bowan 
Looney  J.  Bowman 
Harvey  F.  Bracket! 
John  A.  Brigham 
Floyd  L.  Brown 
Walton  E.  Brown 
Elbert  R.  Bryant 
August  A.  Buehler 
Ambrose  W.  Burdine 
Ernest  P.  Burns 
Johnie  T.  Burton 
Dock  Carter 
Alex.  Cavalier 
Henry  H.  Caywood 
Murt  B.  Clifton 
Walter  S.  Cochran 
Walter  S.  Cooper 
Henry  T.  Cockerell 
William  R.  Cooley 
Jesse  C.  Courtney 
(Continued  on  page  2g4) 


90] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


MACHINE   GUN  COMPANY,  85th  INFANTRY 

Captain  Richard  Bentley  "  Captain  H.  E.  Parsons 

1st  Lieut.  Wilh'am  H.  Reynolds  1st  Sergeant  Chester  R.  Vaughan 


Sergeants 

Jack  L.  Back 

Roy  A.  Milner 

Buddy  Boyd 

Daniel  J.  Daugherty 

Alex.  Bellman 

Jessie  H.  Townsend 

-Arthur  B.  Buford 

Lex  L.  Brown 

Robert  P.  Boggus 

Joseph  P.  Caporal 

Edward  F.  Burks 

Ernest  E.  Tompkins 

WiUis  L.  Curry 

Sullivan  R.  Callahan 

Corporals 

William  L.  Cr>'er 

Charles  G.  Henry 

Jess  Carter 

Allen  J.  Cook 

Tommie  Cromeens 

Clyde  Campbell 

Charles  G.  Chandler 

John  E.  Gray 

Ira  Dodson 

Battis  L.  Smith 

Roy  Edwards 

William  R.  Allen 

Rufus  E.  Edwards 

Walter  J.  Otremba 

.\nsel  E.  Gallaway 

Wallace  Ashley 

Wesley  Griest 

Cook 

Grover  C.  Howard 

Lando  Harris 

Fritz  Guentert 

Rudolph  Hunger 

Privates— First  Class 

Roger  A.  Kerr 

Walter  Behnke 
Thomas  Bell 
Ambrosy  J.  Taras 

Walter  A.  Keegan 
James  W.  Loughmiller 
Florian  Lukaszewski 
Tony  Leone 

Privates 

Will  J.  McCarty 

Alfred  J.  Abbott 

Fred  A.  McGlothlin 

Lee  C.  Anderson 

Charlie  Moore 

Charlie  C.  Martin 
Tolbert  Moncrief 
Peter  Manning 
John  F.  Pauls 
Gus  Patteson 
Stanley  Pozorski 
John  J.  Reidy 
Ijouis  Resnick 
Vichel  H.  Rodgers 
Julian  Romero 
Fred  Sledge 
Charles  A.  Stringer 
Hugh  J.  Shearer 
Henry  F.  Sikes 
Richard  C.  Strickland 
Wayne  R.  Short 
Phocian  L.  Simpson 
Paul  A.  Smith 
Oliver  Spradling 
Clyde  E.  Tate 
Cleveland  T.  Tipton 
Newt  B.  TuUis 
Fred  V'oges 
Harry  E.  Waggoner 
Hugo  D.  Winfrey 
Max  O.  Wenzel 
Willis  D.  Young 
Sabastino  Zaccaria 


91 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


SUrri.V  CU.Ml'ANY,  85th  INFANTRY 


Captain  Wilbert  McDonald 


1st  Lieut.  William  H.  Jarrell 
1st  Lieut.  John  Getgay 


2nd  Lieut.  Earl  I.  Stewart 
2nd  Lieut.  Redmond  Granzow 


Regimental  Supply  Sergeants 
Adolph  Talerico 
Daniel  S.  Miller 
John  W.  Cordell 
1st  Sergeant 
Edward  H.  Pickens 
Supply  Sergeants 
Walter  A.  Guy 
Ben  H.  McCarty 
Leo  B.  Thome 

Mess  Sergeant 
Robert  H.  Ball 

Stable  Sergeant 
Leonard  W.  Pearson 

Sergeants 
Orville  Denison 
Stefan  Keller 

Corporals 
Thomas  B.  Baker 
Marshall  E.  Gurley 


Alexander  Hohn 
Turner  J.  Lindsey 
Claude  Smith 

Cooks 
John  F.  Barcroft 
Laird  Cometsevah 
John  Dorgan 
James  M.  Farris 
Charles  Hardin 
Robert  L.  Hamlin 
Frank  J.  Marbach 

Saddlers 
Eddie  L.  Hallmark 
Moses  K.  Rains 

Mechanics 
John  A.  Baeurle 
Harold  M.  Dye 
Del  E.  Wells 

Horseshoers 
Alfred  C.  Compton 
Giles  L.  Sumrall 


Wagoners 

Hugh  Barber 
Vasker  A.  Barker 
Richard  E.  Bayer 
George  F.  Brawley 
Otto  M.  Benkelberg 
Julius  Bose 
Floyd  P.  Bowers 
David  D.  Brewer 
William  L.  Broetz 
Charles  C.  Carney 
Thomas  E.  Cox 
George  E.  Craig 
Fred  E.  Cole 
Jess  L.  Carver 
Calvert  B.  Carter 
Elo  Chollett 
Samuel  P.  Cole 
George  W.  Crommie 
James  M.  Dorris 
Fred  R.  Dickerson 
Alonzo  A.  Doggett 
Egnar  N.  Edquist 


Abraham  B.  Enloe 
Frank  Fried 
William  H.  Gamble 
Arthur  Green 
Ernest  Green 
Eugene  Green 
Edward  K.  Garrison 
Willie  Gloor 
Wert  W.  Haywood 
Otto  Himly 
Fred  G.  Hahn 
Warren  E.  Hawkins 
Fred  A.  Heid 
Walter  A.  HiUiard 
George  D.  Hagans 
Vonnie  U.  Hallmark 
WiUiam  H.  Hamilton 
Plenie  Johnson 
Thomas  T.  Jackson 
Walter  L.  Kennedy 
Oliver  Kennedy 
Elo  A.  Kuhn 

Continued  on  Page  2C)4 


92] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


'  *v  :~^ 


4^- 


*• 


1st  Lieut.  Lewis  M.  Means 
1st  Lieut.  John  B.  Brettell 

Sergeants 
Bryan  N.  Hamilton 
Roscoe  H.  Stocks 
William  H.  Cyrus 
Oran  G.  Baize 
Samuel  J.  Hicks 
Charley  Clark 
Vernon  J.  Smith 

Corporals 
Ira  J.  Shanks 
Anloni  Lesczcynski 
Mihran  Simonian 
Herman  J.  Drake 
Jesse  W.  Gilbreath 
Ebb  A.  Bullock 
James  V.  Nuckols 
Hardee  M.  Guynes 
Joseph  Serridge 
Theodore  E.  Peek 
Leon  Beauregard 
George  L.  Allen 
Fred  King 
Rov  T.  Fields 
Gordon  R.  Mitchell 


COMPANY   "A,"   85th  INFANTRY 

Captain  Bruce  Q.  Nabers 
1st  Sergeant  Irvin  A.  Wiswell 
1st  Sergeant  George  A.  Klein,  Jr. 


Supply  Sergeant  Thaddeus  B.  Moreman 
Mess  Sergeant  Arthur  L.  Newton 


Cooks 

Chester  W.  Holmes 
Franklyn  E.  Morrow 
Raymond  Daniel 
CUnton  C.  Medford 

Mechanics 

James  L.  .^Iford 
Eli  Obradovic 

Privates — First  Class 

Charles  F.  Jezek 
Joseph  F.  Kustak 
Martin  Miretsky 

Privates 

James  T.  Armer 
Miguel  Asebedo 
George  Bailey 
Ludwig  J.  Bitterly 
Henry  G.  Bland 
Ernest  A.  Boldes 
Howard  Brown 


Willie  Brown 
Samuel  Butera 
Arthur  C.  Calder 
Ernest  A.  Cartwright 
Arch  Cavender 
Fritz  Dahmann 
Leanadus  L.  Davis 
Perry  P.  Dickinson 
William  Doble 
Lewis  R.  Dunwoody 
Ira  Eddy- 
John  H.  Folk 
Burton  Foote 
Carl  C.  Foster 
John  D.  Freeman 
John  Q.  .■\.  Freeman 
Andrew  J.  Gafford 
Oscar  G.  Gips 
Johann  J.  Goewe 
William  C.  Gorman 
Bryan  Griffin 
Otto  Grunwald 
Norman  Gunn 
Marvin  E.  Heard 
Fred  J.  Hellwig 


Carl  Y.  Henley 
Curtis  L.  Hurst 
Ernest  Jackson 
Julius  Jaffee 
Emil  F.  Janssen 
George  Kennemur 
James  A.  Kerss 
William  Kohler 
William  J.  Lau 
Emery  Lister 
Wilbum  A.  McGrady 
Roy  C.  Means 
Oscar  W.  Metzger 
William  T.  Morrison 
Andrew  P.  Munden 
Dick  Parker 
Jules  V.  Shell 
John  F.  Short 
Charles  R.  Stover 
Oliver  Walker 
Benno  Weinheimer 
Clarence  Willingham 


93 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


COMPANY  "B,"   85th  INFANTRY 

Captain  John  Joseph  Murphy 
1st  Lieut.  Frank  M.  Schwarzmeier  1st  Lieut.  Gordon  M.  Ellis  1st  Lieut.  William  T.  Zorn  2nd  Lieut.  Paul  C.  Yecker 

1st  Sergeant  Samuel  Moskowitz  1st  Sergeant  John  P.  Bodecker 

Mess  Sergeant  Birchie  S.  Davis  Supply  Sergeant  George  D.  Backee 


Sergeants 

James  Brown 
Miles  Glaze 
Amie  W.  Cooper 
Fred  Farha 
WiUiam  D.  Taylor 
Joseph  Manna 
Clarence  L.  Meredith 
Anton  B.  Pashackoris 
Sam  Spenny 

Corporals 

Tommie  Pettis 
Vincent  C.  Adams 
Geary  S.  Miskuff 
FeU.x  W.  Wise 
Enford  T.  Glenn 
Royal  W.  Anderson 
William  G.  Stan- 
George  Papsin 
Willie  J.  Collier 
Robert  E.  Gothard 
Fred  R.  Raines 
Owen  P.  Spivey 


William  J.  Addison 
Willie  StricUand 

Cooks 

Virgil  C.  Beck 
Sidney  L.  Xeeley 
Silas  D.  Rutledge 
Emil  Marmitt 

Mechanics 

Andrew  Shaw 
Emmett  H.  Josey 

Bugler 

George  M.  Newby 

Private — First  Class 
Serke  Zarembowsky 

Privates 

Thompson  E.  Baugh 
William  Cosbey 


Victor  Cruz 
Owen  Dooley 
Jim  M.  Edwards 
Ernest  G.  Flores 
Max  Ginsberg 
Clarence  E.  Hairston 
.\hnon  D.  Hall 
Leo  P.  Hart 
Felix  V.  Howe 
William  G.  Hubertus 
Felix  Kensing 
Joe  Kolar 
Stefan  Kurpan 
Walter  H.  Leissner 
Ollie  L.  Lewis 
•  Jerr>'  .^.  Mabrj',  Jr. 
Benjman  H.  ^layfield 
William  J.  McGehee 
Ernest  D.  McKee 
Harry  W.  MiUer 
PhiUp  L.  Mora 
Rosendo  Morelion 
Odas  C.  Mullen 
William  O.  ^Murray 
Dan  C.  Nuckolls 


Stokes  L.  Page 
George  W.  Pierce 
Howard  A.  Pounds 
Ned  W.  Prather 
Guy  N.  Quirl 
John  F.  F.  Rath 
Samuel  Robison 
Driuy  Roper 
Salvador  Salerno 
Leopaed  Sana 
Leo  Scharf 
Paul  Schmitt 
John  Seymore 
Fred  G.  Shramek 
John  T.  Smiley 
Harris  W.  Swan 
Chariie  .\.  Thackerson 
Clarence  C.  Turner 
Ben  L.  Warzecha 
Frank  J.  Warzecha 
Joseph  T.  Warzecha 
Joseph  M.  W^eathersbee 
Peter  Wellies 
ilartin  V.  Worrell 
Richard  Zinsmever 


94] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


COMPANY  "C,"  85th  INFANTRY 


1st  Lieut.  Edward  M.  Giles 
1st  Sergeant  Rufford  O.  Evans 


Captain  Evan  A.  Powell 

1st  Lieut.  Leslie  G.  Knapp 
Mess  Sergeant  Alva  E.  Lane 


2nd  Lieut.  Sranley  Geriba 

Supply  Sergeant  Colie  J.  Williamson 


Sergeants 

Cecil  B.  Marshall 
James  M.  Choate 
Patrick  J.  Hagerty 
Benjamin  H.  Chandler 
George  W.  Standi 
William  T.  Cox 
Anthony  Peter 

Corporals 

William  L.  Alexander 
Chester  Schoonmaker 
John  F.  Sinnott 
James  P.  Willis 
John  R.  Stanislaw 
William  Mastenbrook 
Kjeld  M.  K.  Sorenson 
Emerson  E.  Dray 
Loye  Barnhill 
William  Thompson 
William  W.  Anderson 
Peter  Briere 
Robert  B.  Caskey 
Charles  B.  Germany 


Cooks 
Charles  J.  Healy 
Gan  W.  Johnson 
.\ndrew  R.  Van  Arsdale 

Mechanics 
William  F.  Harris 
Samuel  A.  Woolwine 
Bugler 
Joseph  Gray 

Privates — First  Class 
Jackson  P.  Atkins 
James  R.  Brannan 
James  R.  Clem 
Cosy  T.  Everett 
Francis  Gleason 
Lawrence  L.  Johnson 
Erwin  Kepp 
Arthur  W.  Lunt 
Raymond  J.  Powell 
Sam.  Reale 
Elbert  St.  Clair 
Harold  D.  Scoll 
Charles  H.  Stone 
DeWitt  C.  Williams 


Privates 
James  C.  Adams 
Earl  B.  Allen 
WiUiam  T.  Allen 
John  Arnell 
WilUe  B.  Baker 
Robert  G.  Bishop 
John  W.  Bowman 
Charles  E.  Carroll 
John  Cikanck 
Jeremiah  T.  Crabb 
Marshel  T.  Damron 
Barl.  Daniels 
Joe  Dulin 
Bart.  Falks 
Oscar  A.  Free 
Harvey  A.  Frye 
Craig  M.  Gamble 
John  A.  Haney 
CoUie  N.  Harris 
Robert  G.  Hinds 
John  W.  Hodge 
Willis  H.  Holcomb 
William  E.  Howard 
Willie  W.  Johnson 


Hubert  B.  Jones 
Jesse  R.  Laney 
William  Melton 
John  W.  Millermon 
Lois  C.  Parks 
Dee  A.  Pratt 
John  R.  Purcell 
John  L.  Quick 
Otto  E.  Raabe 
Edmund  C.  RejTiolds 
John  H.  Sawyer 
Charlie  F.  Schweers 
Bonnie  Shelton 
Claud  W.  Shopher 
Jess  C.  Sims 
Doctor  H.  Smith 
Chalrss  H.  Southern 
Albert  S.  Stanton 
Herbert  L.  Stone 
Otis  Tavlor 
William' H.Taylor 
Dock  Thompson 
Walker  T.  Timms 
Jim.  Wimberly 
Manville  H.  Wood 


95] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


COMPANY  "D,"  85th  INFANTRY 


Captain  Arthur  W.  Coleman 


Captain  George  A.  McCallum 


1st  Lieut.  Paul  J.  Aubineau 
1st  Lieut.  William  W.  Schwartz 

Sergeants 

Charles  E.  Trainer 
Elmer  McCombs 
Charles  W.  Gaston 
William  B.  Herndon 


Corporals 

Lum  King 
William  J.  Koons 
Tony  OUvero 
Elmer  H.  Gregory- 
Lyle  T.  Forbes 
Samuel  A.  White 
Joe  O'Neal 
George  E.  Mason 
Coke  C.  Gates 
Clio  L.  Hess. 
John  C.  Langton 

Cooks 

George  Sochko 
Harry  Schleicher 
Burl  B.  Brockus 


1st  Lieut.  Garland  DeGraffenried 
1st  Sergeant  Peter  L.  Milliard 


Supply  Sergeant  Clarence  H.  Brown 
Mess  Sergeant  William  Gibb   . 


Mechanics 
Joseph  H.  Reedv 
Patrick  O'Donn'ell 

Buglers 
Robert  Kirkpatrick     . 
David  W.  Knight 

Privates — First  Class 
Louis  Dario 
Grover  C.  Conner 
Spurgeon  L.  Brannon 
Daniel  Gellock 
Joseph  L.  Gist 
Ira  H.  HaU 
Lee  Roy  Nash 
Waclow  Piasecki 
Leon  Refeld 
Royal  C.  Stiles 

Privates 
Charles  Ahlgrim 
Don  C.  Brown 
William  E.  Brackeen 
Aron  T.  B\Tium 
\"emon  L.  Cresswell 
Clemuel  C.  Chisam 


William  Donaldson 
Alvis  Derryberry 
Nolia  G.  EUiston 
Felix  Ellebrecht 
Tom  Foster 
Mack  Fielder 
Jacob  Frieberger 
John  B.  Fikes 
William  Gaedke 
Oscar  W.  Gohmert 
Harry  B.  Hatch 
Otto  W.  Harms 
Thomas  F.  Hedrick 
Charles  R.  House 
Ralph  A.  Hughes 
Warner  B.  Hester 
John  P.  Hunt 
Edmund  J.  Ideus 
Otto  J.  Jennsen 
Eramett  A.  Kent 
Ewaldo  Kansteiner 
William  Key 
Eberhardt  Knippa 
Alvin  Kendrick 
Rudolph  E.  Lewis 


Eugene  E.  Lucas 
George  McCoy 
Andy  McCullough 
Ferdinand  Mochost 
Willie  Mueller 
Bias  Olvera 
Henry  Raney 
Robert  Randolph 
Ewaldo  Rabenaldt 
John  Roberts 
Henry  Roeben 
Samuel  E.  Sawj'crs 
Emil  Stoeltje 
Wilbern  Summerlin 
Pvichard  Scholz 
Rainhold  Seiffert 
Alfred  Schueneman 
Martin  Schultea 
Sheridan  F.  Taylor 
Charles  Tindol 
Berry  O.  Wilkins 
William  Wrather 
Floyd  Waller 
Carl  Weissmann 
Martin  L.  York 


196] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


COMPANY  "E,"  85th  INFANTRY 


1st  Lieut.  Harry  West 

1st  Sergeant  Richard  J.  Drake 


1st  Lieut.  Edward  D.  Sullivan 
Supply  Sergeant  Everet  W.  Trimble 


2d  Lieut.  Clyde  E.  Hale 
Mess  Sergeant  James  R.  Willis 


Sergeants 
Glenn  Wichman 
Vandorn  O.  Hammond 
Joseph  Ouellette 
Patrick  D.  Brown 
Tom  Sorrel 

Corporals 
Glenn  L.  Hogan 
Peter  M.  Leclair 
Nathan  F.  Smith 
Vance  Tyson 
Gordon  Hendrix 
Edward  L.  Peters 
Willie  E.  Swink 
Richard  M.  Rice 

Cooks 
Wayne  T>.  Pierce 
Joe  E.  Parker 
Elmer  Dean 
John  T,.  Beard 


Mechanics 

J.  K.  Stults 

Jefferson  O.  McClusky 


Privates 

Earnest  G.  Deering 
Samuel  M.  Glickman 
Clinton  Funderburk 
Carl  H.  Kunsmueller 
Bertie  C.  Webb 
Ovid  E.  Abies 
Guy  W.  Anderson 
Earnest  P.  Burnett 
Robert  R.  Buffington 
Walter  J.  Boutte 
Arthur  Callahan 
Banjamin  F.  Coflty 
Hugh  Chumley 
Clarence  A.  Eaton 
Baylis  E.  Farrell 


Clarence  A.  Glassey 
Winifred  A.  Grumbles 
Morgan  A.  Hartley 
Isaac  M.  Howard 
Lory  Hopper 
Thomas  J.  Higginbotham 
John  C.  Riser 
Roy  Landers 
Earl  Malone 
WiUiam  H.  McKee 
Archibald  McDuffie 
Walter  F.  Monford 
Robert  Miles 
DeWitt  Mitchell 
Houston  R.  Middlebrook 
Adolph  Meyer 
Artie  Norton 
William  E.  Riddle 
James  A.  Ramsey 
Reinhardt  Reger 
Willie  V.  Self 
Ben  O.  Schreckengaust 


George  K.  Stephens 
Isaac  L.  Stephenson 
Captain  D.  SuUins 
Eric  Sunden 
Oscar  W.  Smith 
Garland  Swaner 
Joe  A.  Swoboda 
Rolghyie  Turpin 
Dave  Tipton 
Charlie  A.  Tonn 
Earnest  E.  Turner 
Ocie  M.  Turner 
Theodore  Vahrenkamp 
Lewis  E.  Weaver 
Clay  T.  Williams 
Newton  A.  Wilhams 
Montie  E.  Williams 
Samuel  R.  Williams 
Samuel  P.  Williams 
Will  R.  Williams 
Will  B.  Williams 
Leroy  Wigley 


97 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


1st  Lieut.  John  M.  Higgins 

1st  Sergeant  George  M.  Louthan 


COMPANY   "F,"   85th   INFANTRY 

Captain  John  H.  Whidden 

1st  Lieut.  Francis  S.  McManus 
Mess  Sergeant  Perry  H.  Howard 


2nd  Lieut.  James  L.  Moore 
Supply  Sergeant  Louis  Wolff 


Sergeants 

Abe  Hohauser 
John  M.  Carr 
John  J.  Metkus 
Emmett  C.  Adamson 
Ned  M.  Schaaf 
Cvrus  Green 
Burrell  F.  Word 
Howard  L.  Rudolph 
Lawrence  L.  Rodman 
Herbert  A.  Jones 

Corporals 

John  S.  Black 
Edwin  W.  CoveU 
Fred  E.  Zwiefel 
Fred  N.  Scott 
George  E.  Blair  _ 
Lawrence  B.  Smith 
John  Menosky 
John  J.  Stasny 
Walter  M.  Sprinkle 
Edward  Murphy 
Fred  W.  Kohloff 


Andy  B.  Guidry 
John  P.  Marek 
Lewis  Cox 
John  Clay 
Elmer  E.  Lindsey 

Cooks 
Conrad  Watkowski 
Thornton  Parrish 
Wilhelm  J.  H.  Gerken 
Charlie  M.  Zimmerlee 

Mechanics 
William  E.  Fries 
Vernon  J.  Howard 
Arthur  S.  Myers 
Paul  G.  Jesse 

Bugler 
William  J.  Brown 

Privates — First  Class 
Aimer  E.  Amundson 
Bernard  C.  Beck 
Robert  J.  Benson 
John  Braly 
Walter  H.  Lucas 


Albert  Ctvrtlik 
James  A.  Metz 
William  D.  McMillon 
Rayford  B.  O'Neal 

Privates 
Lloyd  H.  Albright 
Walter  H.  Bones 
Elmer  Clark 
John  E.  Corley 
William  E.  Crenshaw 
James  W.  Crite 
Robert  H.  Currie 
Harry  H.  Dodson 
James  I.  Frame 
Michael  H.  Graybill 
Marcos  Garcia 
John  P.  Hale 
Fred  B.  Hamilton 
Leigh  B.  Harkey 
George  J.  Harms 
Elbert  H.  Harris 
William  L.  Hawthorne 
Frank  W.  Henson 
Owen  Hill 


Joseph  E.  Hines 
William  M.  Jenkins 
Albert  J.  M.  Kunkel 
Dorse  McFadden 
Cater  H.  Morgan 
James  H.  Morgan 
Valentine  Nemec 
Virgil  C.  Northington 
Jimmie  Porter 
Charles  Prcin 
George  L.  Reeder 
John  A.  Rogers 
Charles  E.  Watkins 
Kyle  T.  Weaver 
Thomas  E.  Webb 
Frank  E.  Word 
Paul  T.  Zimmerman 
Loyd  C.  Anderson 
Clarence  T.  Beckett 
Omar  R.  Campbell 
Arthur  V.  Craig 
Frank  A.  Hannah 
Thomas  C.  Newson 
Sylyen  J.  Sandage 
Robert  E.  Williams 


[98] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


Captain  John  C.  Byrne 
Captain  Nathan  W.  Legrand 
Captain  Ira  L.  Irving 


COMPANY  "G,"  85th  INFANTRY 

1st  Lieut.  Walter  R.  Blair 
1st  Lieut.  Lloyd  S.  Cleveland 
2nd  Lieut.  John  W.  Love 


1st  Sergeant  Thomas  J.  Wood 
Mess  Sergeant  Joseph  L.  Albers 
Supply  Sergeant  Otto  R.  Manke 


Sergeants 

Carl  T.  McDonald 
Herbert  Lee 
Ervond  Pollard 
John  D.  Ott 
Jack  G.  Leak 
Loyal  Carr 
Otho  O.  Goings 
Frederick  L.  Harris 


Corporals 

William  H.  Freiberger 
James  L.  Berry 
Hillyer  H.  Welborn 
George  H.  Edmonds 
Gardner  R.  Coleman 
Howe  M.  Frisbie 
Walter  Lind 
George  B.  Diamond 
Webster  J.  Bachelot 
David  W.  Frasier 
Jasper  M.  Molsberry 
Joseph  C.  Whittington 
Warren  D.  Marsh 


Cooks 
Alex.  C.  Monroe 
Vernon  C.  McCall 
Claudie  G.  Smith 
Edmond  F.  Dreier 

Mechanics 
Arthur  Adler 
Robert  E.  Dewberry 

Bugler 
I-enie  H.  Smith 
Privates — First  Class 
Robert  L.  Bullock 
Jonah  Carroll 
Thomas  F.  Gannon 
Edwin  R.  Gill 
Elmer  C.  Hoffert 
Charles  C.  Johnson 
Fred  W.  Lipscomb 
August  H.  Lichtenberg 
Fred  Poage 
Henry  M.  Gilbert 
Riley  M.  Short 
Lewis  M.  Turner 

Privates 
Ernest  Brasher 


James  L.  Brown 
Oscar  Burk 
Ike  Brumbelow 
Willie  Carter 
James  A.  Carter 
Earl  Coffey 
James  O.  Eidson 
James  H.  Fair 
James  C.  Farmer 
Robert  L.  Farmer 
Alfred  C.  Gutmann 
Thomas  D.  Hanson 
Joseph  C.  Harlan 
Otto  E.  Hackbarth 
Adolph  E.  Homeyer 
Aksel  Haugen 
Hubert  O.  Jay 
Frank  H.  Johnson 
Wash.  Kwiatkoski 
Frank  A.  Klepac 
August  Kiphen 
Johnnie  O.  Ludwick 
John  P.  Lowe 
John  A.  Labaume 
Leon  R.  McCarty 
Rufus  Moore 


Ernest  McBryde 
Thomas  C.  Morgan 
Marshall  D.  C.  Miller 
Luther  A.  Neeley 
Floy  Neal 
Louis  Novak 
Edward  E.  Phillips 
Herman  C.  Phillip 
Fred  Phillips 
James  J.  Parrish 
Willie  J.  Patton 
William  O.  Pendleton 
Joseph  R.  Quiim 
Willie  J.  Quiram 
Joe  V.  Ray 
Harry  Redeker 
Charlie  C.  Redden 
Ben.  Smith 
Frank  B.  Smith 
David  L.  Smith 
Roy  B.  Spencer 
Robert  W.  Sledge 
Delmar  J.  Scale 
William  L.  Sanders 
Earl  Snapp 
George  D.  Short 


99] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


"%-. 


COMPANY  '-H."  8oth  INFANTRY 


Captain  Vincent  H.  Bell  1st  Lieut.  Douglas  S.  Shapre  1st  Sergeant  Lawrence  Tonder 

Mess  Sergeant  Wesley  J.  Shrader  Supply  Sergeant  Edward  Rumpf 


Sergeants 

Victor  Czajkowski 
Orion  W.  Crane 
August  J.  Bianco 
Roy  B.  Stodghill 
Cbas.  H.  French 

Corporals 

Floyd  Lesh 
Aziel  H.  Bloom 
Eppy  J.  Kernes 
Leo  James 
Julian  B.  Andrews 
Thomas  J.  Phipps 
Albert  Bissell 

Cooks 
William  E.  KeUey 
Burrell  Welch 
Everett  D.  Lotton 

Mechanics 
Glenn  P.  Boyer 
Anton  Fleisher 


Privates — First  Class 

Berbet  J.  Beck 
James  F.  Brackens 
Newton  W.  Babb 
Thunnan  M.  Gates 
George  W.  EUis 
William  Humelhanz 
Richard  Mahan 
George  Orloski 
Nolan  A.  Reed 
Jacob  A.  Sawatzky 
John  F.  Stewart 

Privates 

Santiago  Alderete 
Lonnie  Armentrout 
George  E.  Backman 
John  Booth 
Arthur  D.  Barnett 
Aubrey  H.  Blose 
Ray  Bumes 
Balus  C.  Busby 
CUfford  Beaushaw 


William  E.  Boyles 
Claud  F.  Capps 
Clarence  Carlile 
Louis  J.  Cotromanes 
Edgar  L.  Coney 
Claud  F.  CorbeU 
Charles  A.  Davis 
Jennis  H.  Foltz 
Louis  D.  Forson 
John  F.  Green 
John  D.  Hutchins 
Mitchell  Hightower 
Everett  P.  Ingram 
Ohver  B.  Jester 
Adolph  F.  Johnson 
Conrad  Kenzler 
Henry  H.  Kirk 
James  O.  McMorris 
Hugh  D.  Mason 
Anthony  J.  Mendive 
John  H.  May 
Bennie  H.  McCaslin 
Thomas  S.  Mabr>' 
Otto  Nugent 


Arthur  J.  Parks 
Rock  Perkins 
Albert  Patton 
Virgil  C.  Reedy 
William  H.  Taylor 
Oscar  J.  Wangerman 
Cecil  O.  Witt 
.\rthur  Wood 
James  R.  Wylie 
Hosey  Ward 
Leroy  Ziegler 
Edgar  C.  Allison 
Hubert  A.  Angleton 
William  A.  Baker 
Jack  Besser 
Luther  Cassey 
Robert  C.  Harcrow 
.\lbert  L.  Page 
Hal  Edgar  Shannon 
James  C.  Weston 
Thomas  S.  Wade 
Roy  V.  Warden 
AsaT.  Wynn 
Luther  C.  Watkins 


[100] 


CAMP'TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


Captain  Sylvan  B.  Simpson  1st.  Lieut.  Frank  E.  Washburn 


1st  Sergeant  Frank  Goddard 


Sergeants 
Stanley  M.  Stettz 
Willie  C.  Burgess 
Carroll  T.  Rice 
James  H.  Black 
Sixtus  Gabrysch 
James  E.  Howell 
Lacey  M.  Rumsey 
Arnold  C.  Weeks 

Corporals 
Alton  H.  Kimzey 
Edward  Wacek 
Nelson  Bond 
Theodore  R.  Titus 
John  R.  Tichacek 
Alton  Crowder 


Harvey  N.  Avery 
Henry  C.  Riser 
Clarence  A.  Siegfred 
Barney  Rogers 
John  W.  McCormack 
Glen  Bell 
Leo  Wisniewski 

Cook 
Notre  P.  Stegall 

Mechanics 
Fred  Clarke 
Charles  W.  Van  Riper 
Michael  W.  Murphy 

Bugler 
Leo  M.  Barrett 


Privates — First  Class 
Robert  H.  Allen 
William  Breese 
Cecil  W.  Butler 
John  Donahue 
Edward  B.  Grunwakl 
Fred  J.  Janes 
Frank  Johnson 
Gene  LeRoy 
Joe  M.  Lindsey 
Francis  L.  Massicot 
Louis  V.  Mezydlo 
Albert  G.  Miller 
Monroe  W.  Spence     - 
Setgius  Smith 


Privates 
Charles  C.  Appel 
Willie  R.  Barnes 
Clyde  C.  Billingsle\' 
William  A.  Bridges 
Henry  A.  Cline 
Sidney  B.  Collins 
Samuel  C.  Cowan 
Albert  D.  Drake 
Henry  F.  Fabian 
Frederick  S.  Frary 
Joseph  P.  Gilmore 
Ercey  L.  Hanes 
John  H.  Hill 
Charles  B.  Isenburg 
Willie  Jolinson 


Troy  K.  Jones 
Jonathan  S.  Kilgore 
Robert  Kohl 
Louis  Larza 
Loranzy  J.  Lewis 
Charles  Metres 
Robert  F.  Mitchell 
Joseph  Moody 
Grover  A.  McMurry 
Maxwell  M.  Norris 
Joniy  R.  Pearson 
James  A.  Prater 
James  L.  Rattan 
Gabriel  C.  Salles 
Martin  C.  Sanchez 
Carl  W.  Sweatt 


Daniel  R.  Triche 
Genie  T.  Warren 
Charlie  Wood 
Spencer  Young,  Jr. 
Otto  Zipperlin 
Bryant  E.  Davis 
Newton  T.  Davis 
I'rank  Doering,  Jr. 
Thomas  F.  Dooley  ■ 
Lester  Mc.  Dover 
Arthur  C.  Duclos 
Joseph  E.  Eckert 
John  H.  Evans 
Thomas  F.  Fowler 
Jessie  Gracey 
McKinley  Gregory 


101 


CAMP    TRAVIS     AND    THE     WORLD    WAR 


1st  Lieut.  Thonas  MacLachlan 
1st  Sergeant  James  R.  Balding 


COMPANY  "K,"  85th  INFANTRY 

Captain  John  E.  Martin 
1st  Lieut.  Lawrence  N.  Kremer 
Supply   Sergeant  Paul   Brandenburger 


Sergeants 

Charlie  F.  Midkiff 
Harry  F.  Robinson 
Clarence  A.  Snyder 
Leon  Koonin 
Albert  H.  Nichols 

Corporals 

Joseph  Delisi 
Harry  O.  Nelson 
Clyde  D.  Johnson 
Earl  Blaisdell 
Vincent  P.  Archer 
George  E.  Winslow 
Owen  R.  Kurtz 
Anthony  Breau 
Leonard  F.  Saylor 
James  J.  Vournazos 
Earl  Breitweiser 

Mechanics 

Joseph  Bogdanski 
Logan  James 


Cooks 
John  T.  Bodine 
George  Dahlgren 
William  R.  Landen 

Buglers 
William  H.  Folger 
Lois  Long 

Privates — First  Class 
Alexander  Balkovsky 
Clyde  A.  Barden 
Grafton  C.  Clark 
William  Connahan 
Isaac  M.  LeGard 
Frank  Rebel 

Privates 
Frank  Atbrecht 
Chester  Baldwin 
Walter  E.  Bransdtetter 
John  S.  Calloway 
Willie  Clark 
King  F.  Dei 
Ned  B.  DeWitt 
Rudolph  J.  Engstrom 


2nd  Lieut,  .\rthur  F.  Scott 
Mess  Sergeant  Husey  Robertson 


Tollie  Farrar 
Carl  A.  Fenske 
Albert  L.  Frerich 
Jack  D.  Green 
Charlie  Gregor 
Sam  C.  Harrell 
Virgil  J.  Harvey 
Frank  Jones 
Bedrick  Klezla 
Sep  Kujawa 
Charlie  A.  Lange 
Wilford  M.  Lenunon 
Riley  R.  Manning 
Mike  Martin 
Mike  Mocek 
Walter  Neilson 
Robert  P.  Nicholson 
Kay  R.  Nolen 
George  M.  Page 
Andrew  Podraza 
Edgar  Robinson 
WiU  H.  Shindler 
John  Smith 
John  G.  Spoor 


Paul  A.  Springfield 
Leland  R.  Stewart 
Henry  T.  Szymaszek 
Tommie  D.  Teague 
Arthur  W.  Thibodeaux 
Donnis  F.  Thomas 
Ila  Townsley 
Jesse  W.  Truelove 
Delbert  U.  Wade 
Burl  C.  West 
Hiram  E.  Williams 
James  J.  Wragg 
Thomas  R.  Worthy 
William  F.  Kruse 
Jesse  L.  Lambert 
Thomas  A.  Landon 
Omer  D.  Lea  veil 
Cecil  A.  Looney 
Thomas  J.  Mathews 
Thomas  J.  McGuire 
Albert  W.  Meyers 
Alfred  Newman 
David  J.  Nowlin 
Prinston  Overstreet 


[102] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


COMPANY  "L,"  85th  INFANTRY 

Captain  William  Beardall  Captain  W.  P.  Mayhew  1st  Lieut.  Marion  A.  Spinks 

1st  Lieut.  Robert  L.  Peyton  2nd  Lieut.  Elmer  E.  Davis 


Sergeants 

Mack  T.  Canady 
Steve  Garver 
Hugh  T.  Griner 
Walter  R.  Heaton 
Claude  Henninger 
James  E.  Lewis 
Cooper  G.  Lowe 
Henry  W.  Lyons 
Thomas  D.  Morrison 


Corporals 

Hugh  W.  Boyd 
John'N.  Carmean 
PeteCulwell 
Albert  Czerniak 
Jack  C.JDailey 
William  S.  Lawson 


Bert  L.  Mills 
Floyd  L.  Purnell 
Leon  H.  Watson 

Mechanic 
Ernest  Oldag 

Cooks 
Orville  C.  Adams 
William  E.  Hines 
George  D.  Mitchell 

Bugler 
Merritt  C.  Guthrie 

Privates 
Eddie  Ballard 
Gilmore  Couvillion 
Charles  H.  Dalton 


N.  R.  Davidson 
Joe  DeDemarco 
Clifton  Dennis 
Raymond  R.  Dirba 
George  Foy 
John  Gottschalk 
Alfred  A.  Jacker 
AUred  Hahn 
Oliver  W.  Harvy 
Ewald  K.  House 
Levi  Hutto 
Eugene  F.  Johnson 
Frank  N.  Jovanovich 
Fred  Koch 
Joe  Larance 
Clinton  Lawson 
Cornish  H.  Malone 
James  M.  Manus 
John  Maresh 
Ben  W.  Martin 


Hollie  Mcllvain 
Watson  A.  McKee 
Joe  S.  McKnight 
Jack  P.  MoUoy 
John  L.  Mullins 
Robert  W.  Munson 
John  M.  Noel 
Jesse  R.  Norris 
Walter  F.  Oswalt 
Lee  Parker 
Roy  G.  Patterson 
Hozy  M.  Potter 
John  H.  Price 
Paul  Reckaway 
Edmond  L.  Russell 
Charles  Schultz 
Frederick  Schultz 
Lonnie  Shivers 
Joe  Smith 
Samuel  H.  Snapp 


Floyd  A.  Summers 
John  Thonstad 
Hal.  R.  Townsend 
David  A.  Turpin 
Thomas  M.  Williams 
Eari  S.  Wood 
James  O.  Wilson 
Eari  G.  Stanley 
Albert  E.  Welch 
Amia  L.  Whitfield 
John  C.  Wallner 
Stanley  R.  Slaton 
Will  Lyons 
Charley  H.  Kinney 
Carlton  A.  Knight 
Granville  Jones 
Bert  Jones 
Thomas  A.  Jackson 
Albert  H.  Kittler 
Garlin  Henderson 


[103] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


COMPANY    'M,'  8oth  INFANTRY 


Captain  Herbert  Leachman 
1st  Lieut.  Carl  A.  Peterson 


1st  Lieut.  Edgar  D.  Starbuck 
2nd  Lieut.  Fred  A.  Templeton 


1st  Lieut.  Edward  O.  Little 
1st  Sergeant  Otto  H.  Haardt 


Supply  Sergeant  .\nton  Weilgoez 


iless  Sergeant  Falas  F.  Booker 


Sergeants 

Gaston  C.  Bourgeois 

W^ade  H.  Furr 

John  C.  Surovik 

Adolph  Walker 
Hans  Halve 

Edward  J.  Murray 

Fred  E.  Gray 

Walter  TidweU 

Richard  P.  Yarbrough 

George  R.  Glasscock 

Charles  R.  Tyler 

Barney  Czyz 

Howard  Herbert 

John  Thiebaud 

Corporals 

Oren  L.  Darnell ; 

\'irgil  A.  Jackson 

0.  B.  Thompson 

Harry  D.  Bailey 

Oscar  L.  Davis 

Clarence  A.  Kendrick 

Paul  H.  Tomlinson 

Earl  L.  Gammons 

Emory  Henderson 

Washie  U.  Naler 

William  E.  Tucker 

Herbert  L.  Mitchell 

Joseph  Stephen 

Luther  Maness 

John  Wasicek 

Thomas  M.  Scott 

Con  Kutch 

Allen  H.  McShan 

Willie  W.  Week 

Charles  E.  Hendrick 

Jessie  H.  Peed 

Herman  Worthington 

EmUH.  MuUer 

Privates 

Roy  C.  Parker 

John  A.  W'illiams 

Cooks 

Clifford  0.  Allard 

Frank  Pechal 

FeUx  Young 

Arthur  J.  Autrey 

Francisco  Pitarra 

Herbert  L.  Thompson 

George  Beyer 

Pedro  Alvaras 

John  J.  Riley 

James  L.  Parmley 

.\lbert  Cholet 

Marion  L.  .\wbrey 

John  C.  Rau 

Edgar  A.  Sammons 

Oscar  Otho 

Frank  Bridges 

Virgil  A.  Ridings 

Joseph  Pierce 

Mechanics 

Eldridge  W.  Biggs 

Faustino  G.  Rayes 

Chester  A.  Philpot 

Thomas  E.  Hamilton 
Nelson  Woge 
Arthur  J.  Wilson 

Ma.\  Brustein 

Sebastein  Rodriquez 

Charles  0.  Pugh 

Earl  D.  Cloud 

Clarence  Snider 

Dan  L.  Smith 

John  M.  Coker 
Zaragosa  Cruz 

John  C.  Sifford 
Dan  R.  Shuford 

Hillman  H.  Smith 
Marvin  B.  Wadley 

Privates — First  Class 

Minguel  Carter 

Neely  E.  Shank 

William  E.  Scribner 

Albert  Barth 

.\n  drew  L.  Davis 

Joshua  J.  Sellars 

Frank  W.  Scheel 

1^ 

'^■IM 

[104 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


MEDICAL   DETACHMENT,  85th   INFANTRY 


Major  John  F.  Dunshie 

Captain  William  J.  Douglas  Captain  Orlando  F.  Partridge  Captain  Frederick  H.  Martin 

Sergeant  First-Class,  Ralph  E.  Lanham 


Clarence  H.  Johnson 


Rufus  E.  Gilbreath 
William  H.  Ketsdever 


Frank  L.  Adcock 
0?car  D.  Harrington 
Bernard  A.  Beason 


Sergeants 
Victor  H.  Arnold 

Privates — First  Class 
Louis  M.  Loudermilk 
Patrick  A.  Redwine 

Privates 
Cvril  T.  EzeU 
Bobbie  J.  Hattox 
Bartous  T.  Jackson 
Milton  P.  Simmons 


John  L.  Pepper 


William  O.  Shannon 
Kenneth  F.  Whitebread 


Earl  A.  Joy 
Christ.  Loucas 
Lynn  H.  McClain 


105 


CAMP    TRAVIS    AND    THE    WORLD    WAR 


MAJOR  JOWITT  AXD  STAFF,  53rd  MACHINE  GUN  BATTALION 

Left  to  right: 
1st  Lieut.  Wallace  P.  Martin        2nd  Lieut.  Franck  J.  C.  Loubat        Major  Thad  C.  Jowitt        2nd  Lieut.  Thomas  E.  Prather 


FIFTY-THIRD  MACHINE  GUN  BATTALION 

They  Carried  On  With   That  Famous  M.  G.  Click 


THE  Fifty-third  Machine  Gun  Battalion,  under  com- 
mand of  Major  T.  C.  Jowitt,  was  the  infant  unit  of 
the  Cactus  Division.     Formed  in  October  and  No- 
ember,  it  took  its  place  in  the  Eighteenth  to  make  that 
division  complete  for  overseas  service.    The  nucleus  of  the 
battalion  was  formed  from  the  Nineteenth  and  Thirty- 
fifth  Inf.  and  picked  men  from  Camp  Hancock,  Georgia. 
Of  the  men  from  the  Nineteenth  and  Thirty-fifth,  there 
is  little  to  be  said,  as  they  were  regulars  and  the  best  sol- 
diers to  be  had.    All  having  had  service  on  the  border  and 
intensive  overseas  training,  they  were  just  the  kind  needed. 
Although  machine  gunnery  was  new  they  fell  to  it  with  a 
will  and  very  shortly  had  the  famous  M.  G.  click  in  all 
drills  and  duties. 

The  Hancock  men  were  mostly  new  in  the  service,  but 
they  were  machine  gunners,  having  had  intensive  training 
imder  officers  of  the  American,  British  and  French  armies 


in  the  latest  tactics.  The  combination  of  both  made  the 
best  nucleus  that  could  be  had  and  a  better,  bolder 
battalion  could  not  be  found. 

The  battalion  was  placed  under  command  of  Major 
T.  C.  Jowitt,  a  veteran  of  the  Spanish-American  War  who 
had  risen  from  the  ranks.  He  is  a  real  soldier,  the  true 
type  of  an  American  officer,  and  the  credit  of  progress  made 
can  well  be  given  to  him. 

Of  course  the  signing  of  the  armistice  made  our  hopes 
of  foreign  service  a  thing  of  the  past,  but  the  battalion  is 
still  carrying  on  with  that  M.  G.  enthusiasm  and  click 
that  will  put  machine  gunnery  foremost  among  the 
fighting  units  of  the  American  army. 

Major  Jowitt  was  ably  assisted  by  Lieut.  F.  J.  C. 
Loubat,  adjutant,  and  Lieut.  D.  D.  Hughes,  supply  officer, 
who  put  forth  their  best  in  every  way  to  the  betterment 
of  the  battalion. 


[106] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


COMPANY  "A'"  53rd  MACHINE  GUN  BATTALION 


Lieut.  Alexander  M.  Munro 
1st  Sergeant  James  F.  Shanley 


Captain  Chester  A.  McMillan 

Lieut.  Henry  C.  Richter 
Supply  Sergeant  Samuel  Rotter 


Lieut.  Karl  R.  Davis 

Stable  Sergeant  Walter  Gregory 


Sergeants 

Sidney  E.  Anderson 
Lee  E.  Lyddon 
Raymond  M.  Ritter 
Charles  R.  Stephens 
Victor  M.  Van  Gieson 

Corporals 

Otis  S.  Capps 
Harry  C.  Daniel 
John  D.  Davidson 
Norton  V.  Gorman 
John  R.  Hart 
Melville  E.  Loewus 
Elmer  E.  Toepelman 
Harry  Zimmer 

Bugler 
James  R.  Board 


Privates 


David  L.  Anthony 
Howard  F.  Arnold 
Thomas  H.  Alexander 
Fred  M.  Bachman 
Perry  A.  Baker 
Sidney  Beckman 
William  Boutwell 
Edward  L.  Bruders 
Wilbur  L.  BaUard 
George  F.  Bergman 
Thomas  F.  Bielicke 
Charles  Bonar 
Julian  C.  Brossette 
Rufus  Chappell 
William  Couch 
Junior  C.  Coberly 
Euclid  A.  Covington 
George  D.  Cunningham 
John  V.  Edgmand 


Everitt  H.  Ellison- 
William  Fitzgibbons 
Lisle  C.  Farris 
Clem  Ferges 
Alpha  B.  Gaither 
James  Godbee 
Dennis  A.  Galvin 
Peter  Geier 
John  A.  Gordon 
Norman  L.  Gray 
Herman  Hagen 
Joseph  Head 
Frederick  Hensel 
Jack  Hall 

Thomas  H.  Hanger 
Paul  Heimsoth 
Forrest  I.  Hosier 
Alpha  Johns 
Huff  Jones 
Oliver  Jones 
William  Joyce 


Theodore  Jerome 
Paul  Jachin 
John  T.  Kendrick 
George  Katzulis 
Clarence  B.  Kanatzar 
WUUam  J.  King 
Leo  L.  Lanahan 
Firmin  Landrieu 
Arvid  R.  Larson 
Asa  V.  Louk 
Willard  J.  Loudon 
Raymond  J.  Loughran 
Amton  J.  Mattern 
Sidney  Mims 
Simon  B.  McMahon 
Arthur  M.  Moll 
Robert  Morris 
Elmer  J.  Mullaney 
William  Paerson 
Frederick  J.  Palmer 
Gav  D.  Peterson 


Lex  Pressley 
Reuben  S.  Padgett 
Harold  I.  Stevens 
Albert  O.  Skivens 
Ernest  B.  Schrage 
Howard  E.  Stockett 
Claude  D.  Sweangen 
Frank  Tingen 
Verne  Theobold 
Samuel  F.  Tucker 
Dale  B.  Towne 
Henry  Vedrine 
Joseph  H.  Wells 
Claude  A.  West 
Loren  H.  Wason 
Joseph  E.  Wood 
James  Woodall 
Myron  D.  Williams 
Fred  Zamzow 


107 


CAMP    TRAVIS     AND    THE     W O R L D    W A R 


L^-. 


COMPANY  "B,"  o3rd  MACHINE  GUN  BATTALION 


Captain  Edwin  S.  Beall 
2d  Lieut.  John  B.  Rex  Leary  2d  Lieut.  Ralph  B.  Crosby 


Sergeants 

Mancel  D.  Williams 
Harry  M..  Welch 
Harry  Hess 
Omer  D.  Nolen 

Corporetls  : 

Karl  Hugo 
Harry  P.  Weber 
William  R.  Becker 
Earl  E.  Carpenter 
Alonzo  C.  Go  win 
James  O.  Seger 
Howard  H.  Tower 

Cook 
George  K.  MuUins 

Mechanic 
Edward  A.  Voigt 


Bugler 
Harry  L.  Curl 

Privates 

George  P.  Anderson 
Arthur  R.  Andrews 
William  B.  Backus 
Fred  E.  J.  Bailey 
Jerome  N.  Baum 
Axel  P.  Bjorkman 
Phillip  Bloxhem 
Elon  J.  Boone 
William  R.  Bossout 
Horace  F.  Bragg 
Joseph  F.  Brich 
Allen  W.  Brittain 
Henry  Bommelman 
George  M.  Cagle 
William  G.  Calkum 
Walter  A.  Chase 


Austin  Clement 
Michael  Considine 
Wilbur  M.  Collins 
Leon  Dobracyznski 
Edgar  A.  Dopp 
George  S.  Dowdle 
Hohn  T.  Escheid 
Charles  E.  Evans 
Alvie  J.  Farnsworth 
Tony  Fleming 
Joseph  G.  Flowers 
Ray  Frye 
Owen  O.  Fowler 
Frank  G.  Galloway 
Charles  T.  Geising 
Lennie  A.  Gilmore 
John  T.  Glover 
Orrin  L.  Coins 
Glenn  S.  Grimsby 
Arthur  R.  Haley , 
Watterson  Hammett 
X'ivian  Hartgrove 


Emil  Haurin 
Joseph  Hofmeister 
Eugene  C.  HoUis 
Aylmer  F.  HoUoway 
George  C.  Huebner 
Dwight  L.  Hustead 
Edwin  H.  T.  Humbracht 
Earl  R.  Jackson 
George  S.  Jackson 
Harold  N.  Johnson 
Jens  Keilstrup 
Floyd  Keiser 
Charles  W.  Kemp 
John  H.  Knight 
William  Koehler 
Elmer  R.  Learn 
Elbert  H.  Leek 
Joseph  L.  Lambeth 
Andrew  B.  Lassater 
Clayton  M.  Logan 
Cornelius  Menzelaar 
Roy  E.  Menefee 


Ephrian  B.  Mobley 
John  T.  Morgan 
Herman  Neinaber 
Anton  Nikolai 
Raymond  J.  O'Mera 
Elias  M.  Padget 
Arvid  F.  Peterson 
Hubert  L.  Phillips 
Nicholas  J.  Pitt 
Augustus  L.  Proctor 
Henry  F.  Redemann 
John  A.  Ringer 
Bert  C.  Rutherford 
William  H.  Summers 
Teddy  E.  Sumrall 
James  Trimble 
Hugh  C.  Vinton 
Adlai  E.  Warden 
McCoy  C.  Wisdom 
James  L.  Williard 
Emmett  R.  Walsh 
John  W.  Walker 


[108] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


COMPANY  "C,"  53id  MACHINE  GUN  BATTALION 


Captain  William  E.  Hitchcock 
Sergeants 

Charles  R.  McVay 

Monroe  Conn 

Eugene  A.  Vandeneynde 

Corporals 

Roy  A.  Dale 
Jesse  R.  Hudson 
Walther  C.  T.  Lange 

Privates 

Bolden  Alford 

James  L.  Anderson  ^ 

John  Anderson 

Joseph  A.  Bass 

HoUis  Bellamy 

Curtis  C.  Bennett 

Henry  G.  Blohm 

Louis  G.  Bork 

George  D.  Bosarge 

Herbert  H.  Brayton 

Thomas  Brett 

Spurgeon  R.  Brown 


Lieut.  Oscar  Miller 

Otto  E.  Buhr 
Edward  L.  Burell 
Lewis  Bushey 
Frank  G.  Busker 
Clifford  O.  Caviness 
John  W.  Coe 
Rossa  G.  Coons 
William  C.  Crow 
Henry  A.  Crutcher 
Sidney  Egloff 
Glenn  G.  Ellington 
Frank  J.  Fleming 
Juan  C.  Fernandez 
Frank  Gaede 
Royce  Galloway 
Roy  H.  Gamble 
Harold  E.  Gilman 
Amos  Glass 
Paul  J.  Gospodor 
George  W.  Gray  ■ 

Elmer  A.  Gustafson 
Charlie  W.  Habedank 
Eddie  H.  HaU 
Thomas  L.  Hurley 
Allious  J.  Haynes 


Lieut.  Fred.  C.  Wilson 

Willie  S.  Herrington 
Joseph  F.  Hildt 
George  G.  Holmberg 
Thomas  E.  Hubbard 
Charles  W.  Hunnell 
Harry  L.  Hyatt 
Preston  I.  Jacobs 
Fred  A.  James 
Thomas  G.  Jones 
Max  Kaminski 
Cleveland  Kimbrough 
Edward  J.  Knieps 
Leo  Keenan 
Frank  M.  Kohs 
Leonard  J.  Larson 
Joseph  P.  Littleton 
David  E.  Lind 
William  Lowery 
Orville  McK.  Martin 
Harold  E.  Marquith 
Walter  E.  McCabe 
Thomas  L.  McCarter 
Joseph  E.  McDonnell 
Henry  F.  Mielke 
Blake  0.  Moore 


1st  Sergeant  Herbert  J.  Pahn 

John  W.  A.  C.  Noetzelman 
Dow  Norman 
Frank  Pinta 
Hugh  L.  Poorman 
Allan  T.  Pray 
Harry  J.  Quinn 
Assa  B.  Rainwater 
Lawrence  A.  Roof 
William  Sherer 
Albert  C.  Schroeder 
Arthur  A.  Sievers 
John  D.  Snider 
John  T.  Spencer 
Pearl  L.  Swisher 
Alvaro  R.  Thomson 
Harry  Tlapa 
John  C.  UUerichs 
John  H.  Vickery 
Otto  H.  Wehring 
Walter  C.  Wiechmann 
Herman  Will 
Albert  Witte 
Ocie  T.  Woodall 
William  Yaeger 


109 


CAMP    TRAVIS     AND    THE    WORLD    WAR 


stK.'xms'am 


COMPANY  "D,"  53rd  MACHINE  GUN  BATTALION 


Captain  George  H.  Bradley 
2nd  Lieut.  Alexander  Dagger 


Sergeants 
Kinsey  E.  Thomas 
Ray  A.  Brewster 

Corporals 
Frederick  C.  Paasch 
Joseph  L.  Helmbrecht 
Richard  D.  Claus 
Herman  C.  Baesler 
Steve  Staniak 
Edward  W.  Berk 
Theodore  L.  Owens 
Louis  Anslem 
William  V.  Self 

Privates 
Vincent  F.  Argue 
Ray  D.  Baker 
Fr«lerick  J.  Becker 


Jesse  Brinegar 
William  H.  Boening 
Edgar  T.  Booker 
Thomas  J.  Booth 
William  O.  Bossmann 
George  V.  Campbell 
Daniel  J.  Carroll 
Rufus  J.  Clark 
Pierro  F.  Colson 
Noel  A.  Crittenden 
Iva  F.  Darr 
WiUiam  L.  Delaney 
Ted  Ebbs 
CUfton  V.  Eick 
Elmer  A.  Ekdahl 
John  C.  Fabian 
Walter  S.  Foreman 
Eddie  Fugitt 
William  R.  Gainey 


Oswald  T.  Gleich 
Ralph  Gibson 
Seymore  Gibson 
Edd  Glover 
Harold  V.  Good 
Lawrence  B.  George 
Wiley  L.  Graves 
Thomas  G.  Green 
Fayne  E.  Haradon 
Albert  G.  Heidemann 
Sam  Hicks 
Samuel  Holder 
Clifford  H.  Holloway 
Percival  Horie 
James  H.  Howard 
Victor  Hewlett 
WilUam  S.  Hubbard 
Charles  A.  Hurst 
George  R.  Irby 


2nd  Lieut.  John  W.  Wallace 
1st  Sergeant  Arthur  C.  Welty 

Earl  Jenkins 
Guy  Joiner 
Benjamin  T.  JoUey 
Cecil  Juby 
Frank  Kamerit 
Charles  Knight 
John  D.  Kimmell 
Anton  B.  Kouba 
Raymond  A.  Krickl 
Halver  Lund 
Dave  Manley 
Dermis  B.  McCarty 
Elbert  G.  Miller 
Joseph  Miller 
Charles  I.  Mishler 
Jack  Moore 
John  A.  Nelson 
Mack  Patten 
Leon  M.  Phillips 


William  E.  Pickering 
Donald  Pint 
James  L.  Reeder 
Otto  Rueter 
Artie  E.  Shaffer 
John  Swift 
Harold  M.  Shoard 
Alfred  Skoog 
Frank  E.  Tile 
Lowell  Tracy 
Henry  J.  Unruh 
Claude  C.  WaUs 
Columbus  L.  Watkins 
Thomas  Weaver 
Theo.  Weimar 
Sewell  B.  Weston 
Paul  F.  Wickman 
Frank  R.  Willis 
Isadore  Zekakis 


[no: 


CAMP    TRAVIS    AND    THE    WORLD    WAR 


111] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


BRIGADIER-GENERAL  SHAW 


THE  military  career  of  Brigadier-General  Frederick 
B.  Shaw,  commanding  the  Thirty-sixth  Infantry 
Brigade,  is  an  illustration  of  the  democratic  spirit 
of  the  United  States  army.  He  rose  from  the  ranks,  a  fre- 
quent enough  occurrence  in  the  military  organization  of 
our  country  to  puncture  the  equally  frequent  claims  that 
the  army  is  in  the  hands  of  a  caste-bound  military  clique. 
In  point  of  service.  General  Shaw  is  one  of  the  veterans 
of  the  division,  for  he  joined  the  army  in  1892  as  a  private 
in  the  Twenty-first  Infantry.  Previously  he  had  been  in 
the  newspaper  business  in  Elmira, 
N.  Y.  After  three  years  in  the  ranks 
he  passed  his  examination  for  com- 
mission, was  appointed  second  lieu- 
tenant and  joined  the  Fifth  Infantry 
at  Fort  McPherson,  Georgia. 

His  chance  for  active  service 
came  soon,  with  the  out-break 
of  the  Spanish-American  War. 
The  regiment  was  ordered  to  guard 
duty  in  South  Carolina,  and  later 
to  concentrate  at  Tampa,  Florida, 
where  it  was  to  join  General 
Schwann's  brigade  and  go  with  the 
Porto  Rican  expedition.  The  regi- 
ment did  not  assemble  in  time, 
but  Lieutenant  Shaw  was  ready,  and 
as  he  had  been  detailed  as  quarter- 
master and  commissary  of  the  bri- 
gade hospital  he  went  along. 

The  brigade,  consisting  of  the 
Eleventh  Infantry,  Troop  A,  Fifth 
Cavalry  and  two  batteries  of  artil- 
lery, disembarked  at  a  point  fifteen 
miles  west  of  Ponce  and  immedi- 
ately advanced  in  the  direction  of 
the  enemy.  At  Hormigueriez,  the 
Alfonzo  XIII  Regiment  of  Spain  disputed  its  progress,  and 
the  first  action  occurred,  with  casualties  to  the  Americans 
which  were  imwittingly  doubled  by  Lieutenant  Shaw.  An 
old  sugar  mill  in  rear  of  the  American  lines  was  designated 
as  a  temporary  hospital.  The  one  soldier  killed  in  the  action 
fell  in  a  conspicuous  place  in  the  middle  of  the  military 
road,  and  as  most  of  the  men  were  recruits,  General 
Schwann  feared  the  effect  on  their  morale  and  ordered 
Lieutenant  Shaw  to  take  the  body  to  the  sugar  mill. 


FREDERICK  B.  SHAW 
Brig.-Gen.  Cmdg.  36th  Inf.  Brigade 


His  men  carried  the  dead  soldier  half  a  mile  down  the 
road  and,  evidently  fearing  they  might  miss  something, 
dropped  him  under  a  tree. 

After  the  engagement  Lieutenant  Shaw  started  for  the 
sugar  mill  to  see  that  the  wounded  were  provided  with 
supper,  and  on  the  way  discovered  the  body  again.  He 
ordered  it  placed  in  the  ambulance,  made  a  note  that  two 
men  had  been  killed  in  action  and  so  reported  to  the 
brigade  commander.  He  didn't  discover  his  mistake  until 
the  following  day  when  only  one  body  was  available  for 
two  military  funerals. 

On  his  return  to  the  United  States 
in  September,  Lieutenant  Shaw 
learned  that  his  regiment  had  taken 
station  in  Santiago,  Cuba,  and  he 
joined  it  there  and  found  a  commis- 
sion as  first  lieutenant  awaiting  him, 
as  well  as  an  order  to  report  to  the 
Nineteenth  Infantry  in  Porto  Rico. 
He  arrived  at  his  new  station  shortly 
before  the  regiment  received  orders 
to  proceed  to  the  Philippines.  He  was 
in  the  Panay  campaign  in  1899-1900. 
He  was  promoted  captain  in 
1901,  and  for  several  years  there- 
after saw  duty  in  the  island  posses- 
sions, along  the  border  and  spent 
one  year  at  the  Fort  Leavenworth 
school,  from  which  he  was  grad- 
uated in  1906.  He  received  his 
majority  in  July,  1916,  and  was 
assigned  to  the  Thirty-sLxth  Infan- 
try, which  was  later  ordered  to 
Fort  Snelling,  Minn.,  to  divide  and 
form  the  Thirty-sixth,  Fortieth  and 
Forty-first  Regunents.  In  June, 
1917,  he  was  promoted  colonel  and 
ordered  to  Camp  Pike,  Arkansas,  where  he  organized  and 
operated  the  receiving  depot,  until  November  when  he  was 
appointed  acting  chief  of  staff  of  the  Eighty-seventh  Divi- 
sion. His  success  as  organizer  of  the  receiving  depot  marked 
him  for  future  work  of  that  nature  and  so  in  the  spring  of 
1918,  when  the  replacement  camps  were  conceived,  he  was 
ordered  to  Camp  Gordon,  Georgia,  to  help  organize  the 
first  one  in  the  country.  He  was  promoted  brigadier-gen- 
eral in  October  and  assigned  to  the  Eighteenth  Division. 


112] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


BRIGADIER  GENERAL  SHAW  AND  STAFF 

Left  to  right 

1st  Lieut.  Wm.  Hermann  Major  Alvin  H.  Hankins  Brig.  Gen.  Frederick  B.  Shaw 

Capt.  A.  Miles  Coe  2nd  Lieut.  R.  H.  Carter 


ENLISTED  PERSONNEL,  36th  INFANTRY  BRIG.\DE  HEADQUARTERS 

[1131 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


THIRTY- FIFTH  INFANTRY 

Baby  of  the  Regulars,  Its  Birthplace  If'' as  Arizona 


CONCEIVED  amid  the  howl  of  desert  winds,  suckled 
on  the  milk  of  the  cactus  and  toughened  through 
contact  with  the  spines  of  the  prickly  pear,  the 
Thirty-fifth  Infantrj',  the  baby  of  the  Regulars,  is  a  product 
of  the  arid  lands.     Its  men  are  the  fibre  of  the  desert, 
either  from  birth,  or  adoption  by  years  of  service.     In 

the  early  history  of  the 
organization  they 
were  taken  from  the  en- 
listed personnel  of  the 
Eleventh,  the  Eighteenth 
and  the  Twenty-second 
Infantry  of  the  Regular 
Army. 

Arizona  was  its  birth- 
place, for  it  came  into 
being  at  Douglas  on  July 
8, 1916,  and  in  the  sands 
of  the  Arizona  plateau  it 
was  nurtured  into  the 
sturdy  infant  that  was 
brought  to  Camp  Travis 
to  spend  its  tender  years  as  a  member  of  the  Eighteenth 
Division.  Among  mines,  in  sparsely  settled  border  com- 
munities and  on  the  trail  of  the  prolific  propagandist  of 
the  Sierras  it  has  spent  its  days  and  nights,  and  its  baptism 
of  fire  came  through  contact  with  tequila-mad  muchachos 
of  the  Sonora  custom  guards  at  Nogales,  where  it  took  its 
quota  of  soldados  many  times  over  for  the  three  who  fell 
from  the  bullets  of  the  enemy. 

Its  career  in  Camp  Tra\-is  commenced  in  the  early  part 
of  August,  1918,  when  the  first  and  third  battalion  were 
transferred  to  the  Te.xas  post  to  become  a  part  of  the 
Cactus  Division.  The  second  battalion  had  been  left  at 
Nogales  on  border  patrol  duty,  and  it  was  while  in  the 
pursuit  of  this  detail  that  the  skirmish  came  with  the 
Mexicans  on  August  27th.  Prior  to  the  transfer  of  the 
two  battalions  to  Camp  Travis,  the  various  component 
companies  had  been  engaged  in  the  protection  of  copper 
mines,  smelters  and  government  dams  at  Douglas,  No- 
gales, Yuma,  Lowell,  Roosevelt  Dam,  Granite  Reef  Dam, 
Globe,  Ray,  Miami  and  Cornelia  mines.  Numerous  plots 
of  the  Hun  agents  were  thwarted  through  this  ceaseless 
vigilance,  especially  after  the  declaration  of  war  against 
the  Teutonic  powers  by  the  United  States. 

Within  a  month  after  the  declaration  of  hostilities  676 
men  and  seven  officers  who  had  been  enlisted  and  trained 
in  border  warfare  by  the  Thirty-fifth  left  Nogales  to  be 
transferred  to  regiments  of  the  .'\merican  Expeditionary 


Forces.  The  Thirty-fifth  was  again  recruited  to  war 
strength  and  the  rookies  were  given  the  vision  of  ser\ice 
over  there.  But  it  was  not  to  be.  The  border  service  of 
the  regiment  continued  unremittingly  and  it  was  not  until 
November,  1918,  that  it  was  relieved  when  the  second 
battalion  was  ordered  to  Camp  Travis. 

Shortly  after  arriving  at  Camp  Travis  under  command  of 
Col.  James  H.  Frier,  the  regimental  commander,  the  first 
and  third  battalions  were  made  the  nuclei  of  the  Eighty- 
sixth  Brigade,  through  the  transfer  of  some  five  hundred 
selected  men  to  the  Eighty-sixth  Regiment  which  was 
then  organized  in  skeleton  form. 

Colonel  Frier  is  one  of  the  veterans  of  the  Regulars. 
Born  in  Missouri  in  March,  1864,  he  was  appointed  a  cadet 
at  West  Point  in  July,  1882,  and  commissioned  as  a  second 
lieutenant  in  the  Seventeenth  Infantry  in  July,  1886. 
Through  years  of  border  service  he  attained  successive  pro- 
motions until  he  was  appointed  an  inspector-general  in 
March,  1911,  with  rank  of  major.  It  was  from  lieutenant- 
colonel  of  the  Twelfth  Infantry  that  he  was  promoted  to 
the  colonelcy  of  the  Thirty-fifth  upon  its  organization 
Julyl,  1916. 

While  not  a  replacement  regiment,  the  Thirty-fifth  has 
furnished  many  a  Sammy  who  crossed  the  seas  and  paid 
the  supreme  penalty  for  his  heroism.  Many  a  golden  star 
shines  in  the  pennant  of  another  regiment  for  a  lad  in 
khaki  who  learned  his  first  taste  of  "squads  right"  from 
the  duty  sergeant  of  the 
Thirty-fifth,  and  many  an 
officer  who  acquired  his 
golden  bar  through  a  train- 
ing camp  was  the  finished 
material  which  came  to  the 
cactus  land  in  the  rough. 
The  regiment's  own  gold 
stars  are  symbols  of  the  gal- 
lantry of  Lieutenant  Loftus, 
of  Laredo,  Texas,  who  fell 
before  a  torrent  of  lead  from 
badly  aimed  Mexican  guns, 
and  of  Corporals  Edgar  Lotz 
and  Frank  L.  Whitworth, 
the  Company  G  men  who 

died  with  him  in  the  streets  of  Mogales.  Twelve  enlisted 
men  wear  wound  chevrons  from  that  encounter  and  under 
the  service  regulations  practically  every  member  is  entitled 
either  to  the  silver  chevrons  of  honorable  service  in  America 
for  preparedness  for  action,  or  the  gold  V  which  betokens 
service  against  the  Hun  and  his  allies. 


114] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


C(Jl.O.\hL  IRIER  AND  STAFF,  35th  INFANTRY 

Left  to  right — seated 

Capt.  Floyd  Lyle 
Col.  Jas.  H.  Frier 
Capt.  Harvey  A.  Schwab 
Capt.  Richard  F.  Kinnear 


1st  Lieut.  William  L.  O'Donnell 
Major  Clarence  L.  Tinker 


Left  to  right — standing 

1st  Lieut.  Cyril  K.  Richards 
ilajor  Alfred  S.  Balsam 


1st  Lieut.  Daniel  H.  Ripley 
Major  Harold  G.  Chisholm 


[115 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


HEADQUARTERS  COMPAXV,  3oth  LMAXTRV 


Captain  Allison  Ware 

1st  Lieut.  Joshua  S.  Bowen 


1st  Lieut.  Fletcher  H.  Etheridge 
1st  Lieut.  Robert  E.  Cummings 


1st  Lieut.  Desmond  J  Farrell 
2nd  Lieut.  Charles  Kohl 


Reg.  Per.  Sgt.  Major 
Andrew  E.  Johnson 

Reg.  Sgt.  Major 
Walter  D.  HoUiday 

Battahon  Sergeant  Majors 
Claude  A.  Lamprich 
Adam  L.  Harris 

1st  Sergeant 
Wilbur  A.  Morel 

Mess,  Supply  and  Stable 

Sergeants 
George  D.  Gruninger 
Jerome  Mausel 
Henry  Batchelor 

Color  Sergeants 
Frederick  Tscheulin 
John  C.  Patrich 

Per.  Sergeants 
Fred  L.  Fassett 
Edward  Miller 


Duty  Sergeants 
John  Hammer 
John  Fider 
Edward  Shaughnessy 
Henry  H.  Payne 
Henry  B.  Shepherd 
Charles  S.  Acree 
Walter  C.  Ormiston 
George  E.  Boiling 
William  E.  Borg 
Vincent  Kuznicki 
Frank  McManus 
Arthur  F.  Cady 
George  Baiu 

Sergeants 
Ulysses  Miller 
Walter  P.  Grubbe 
Clarence  P.  Lenart 

Corporals 
Charles  E.  O'Rourke 
William  Matthews 
Phillip  Green 
Frank  E.  Morris 
Eddie  Pendergrast 


Frank  B.  Bennett 
James  J.  McCarthy 
Timothy  J.  O'Brien 
William  R.  Shipley 
Clifford  G.  Maescher 
.\lbert  M.  Derr 
Louis  M.  Cowden 
Homer  E.  Collar 
Ralph  L.  McMahon 
Ray  E.  Mitchell 
Paul  C.  Bowman 
WilUam  H.  Anderson 
Charles  J.  Hitt 
Leo  C.  Coulehan 
Daniel  H.  KiUin 
Peter  M.  Murphy 
Thomas  G.  Pike 
Herman  G.  Love 
Hobson  D.  Riddick 
Leslie  A.  Goss 
Clarence  H.  Vunk 

Privates — First  Class 
Lester  .\lden 
Charles  M.  Burrell 
Charles  D.  Demar 


Ernest  D.  Duncan 
James  P.  Easley 
John  J.  Ewing 
Walter  R.  Graham 
Roy  Green 
Ezekiel  HoUomon 
Stanley  G.  Horn 
Arthur  Husband 
William  J.  Clawson 
Frederick  W.  Kufer 
Ray  E.  McLaughlin 
Andy  B.  Morlo 
Ralph  E.  Murphv 
Patrick  O'Neil 
Clarence  O'Rourke 
Robert  D.  Pauben 
Demcy  L.  Riou.x 
Oscar  C.  Rodgers 
Harold  S.  Sabel 
Guy  S.  Snyder 
.\dolph  Shubert 
Lawrence  Mc.^uley 
Leland  Tucker 
Charles  S.  Warren 
William  J.  Wagner 
William  A.  Whitlock 


Felix  J.  Brandes 
Donald  S.  Conner 
.\lfred  W.  Fees 
.\xel  P.  Pierson 
Roger  N.  Teachout 

Cooks 
William  F.  Gorman 
Melvin  L.  West 
John  W.  Coleman 
Ernest  Deluka 
.Alfred  Allegrina 
Joseph  Jakes 

Mechanics 
Bonnie  B.  Pritchard 
Clyde  R.  Mc.\doo 
Louis  E.  Eberling 
William  J.  Wightman 

Privates 
Wm.  D.  Allison 
Howard  W.  Andree 
Harry  W.  Armstrong 
W'm.  L.  Bailey 
Continued  on  page  150 


wmrm^^mimsm 


116 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


MACHINE  GUN  COMPANY,  35th  INFANTRY 


1st  Lieut.  Harry  N.  Rising 
1st  Sergeant  Dennis  Fenton 


Sergeants 
Wm.  E.  Black 
Edward  M.  Clithero 
Arthur  Brewer 
Owen  T.  Allen 
Clarence  Armstrong 
Jesse  Q.  Hodges 
Arthur  E.  Fredericks 
Melvin  Korsrud 
Mickel  Rogan 
Ernest  O.  DePriest 
Norman  J.  McPherson 
Max  Beck 
Oel  Ingram 

Corporals 
Joseph  S.  Quinn 
John  E.  Page 
Dorhie  K.  Bradley 
John  P.  Quinlan 
Jesse  I.  Marsh 
Edgar  H.  West 
Arthur  J.  Walch 
Clarence  M.  McCutcheon 


Harry  E.  Hammond 
Joseph  E.  Thomas 

Cooks 
Gustave  Kroll 
William  Clair 
John  Lang 

Horseshoer 
Leo  Theuret 

Saddler 
Gilbert  McHenry 

Mechanics 
Olaf  Swenson 
William  Johnson 
Floyd  Haden 
Buglers 
James  A.  Carney 
J.  A.  Richardson 

Privates — First  Class 
Roy  N.  Britton 
Asbury  A.  Castile 
William  P.  Flaherty 
Edward  Frecce 
Nicholas  Click 


Captain  W.  C.  Peters 

1st  Lieut.  Richard  F.  Bailey 
Mess  Sergeant  Charles  Overill 

Thomas  K.  Parrish 
Victor  Sime 
Mahlon  F.  Troutner 
James  R.  Upton 
Emerson  B.  Horn 
Otto  J.  Brauns 
Edward  J.  Fitzgerald 
Howell  C.  Jones 
Marx  L.  Lorig 
Thomas  K.  McCabe 
Andrew  J.  McCulley 
Lester  A.  Stephens 
George  Zimmerman 


1st  Lieut.  John  B.  Shults 
Supply  Sergeant  Allen  R.  Bell 


Privates 

James  A.  AUee 
Frank  J.  Bertorello 
Chester  L.  Brady 
Leonard  P.  Burkland 
James  H.  Burns 
Edward  M.  Broderick 
CoUn  P.  CampbeU 
Floyd  I.  Davis 
Clarence  DeGraff 


Patrick  Devlin 
Henry  Diedrich 
Fred  Dorband 
Louis  Eberle 
Edwin  Eberlein 
William  R.  Flynn 
Herbert  J.  Furphy 
Thomas  K.  Gibbons 
John  J.  Grannon 
Alexander  E.  Gordon 
Conrad  F.  Groh 
John  Guthridge 
James  E.  Hamlin 
Walter  C.  Hammond 
Edward  J.  Hanna 
Charles  S.  Hobbs 
Edward  H.  Holcombe 
Glen  Hazlett 
Henry  Hutchison 
John  J.  Kennedy 
Peter  Knockaert 
Hollie  E.  Lanphear 
John  P.  LeComte 


John  F.  Milliken 
Charles  W.  Moody 
Ernest  L  Murphy 
Hilliard  F.  McClanahan 
Richard  N.  Nigg 
LaFayette  F.  Ogilvie 
O.  G.  Richardson 
Charles  Robertson 
Leroy  Rupp 
Carl  B.  Schmidt 
Garrett  Schneider 
Walter  W.  Scheppler 
Roland  A.  Siebold 
Harry  A.  Skinner 
Leslie  E.  Taylor 
Wilhelm  E.  Thoennissen 
Ralph  F.  Tucker 
George  Weber 
James  O'D.  Willey 
Robert  E.  Weyhe 
Emil  C.  Wuttke 
Fred  Johnson 
Harold  Domer 


[117] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


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[118] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


COMPANY  "A,"  35th  INFANTRY 


Sergeants 
John  Murray 
Paolo  Caridi 
Hurshel  Corkren 
John  Tate 
James  E.  Burton 
•John  F.  Diehl 
John  T.  Brown 


Captain  Benjamin  W.  Wood 

Captain  .'Vrch  M.  Baird 
Leo  P.  Sobicraj  Cooks 

Alex  A.  Walczak      Danilay  Bubin 
William  J.  Wasson  Elmer  V.  Olbert 
Jimmie  Williams      Oscar  R.  Ross 
Alexander  Wyslocki  Clarence  Sterling 
Walter  Szczubialka         Mechanics 
William  A  Carter    ^^ibgrt  W.  Butler 
Perry  Kiefer 


ChrisUanM.Ravndal  MartmT  Wicker 
Luther  E.  Matthews  Harry  F.  Eulitt 
WiUiam  M.  Murphy  G"y  Atkmson 


1st  Lieut.  Edwin  M.  Allison  1st  Lieut. 

1st  Lieut.  Paul  P.  Reily  1st  Lieut. 

Glen  Childers  Otto  L.  Pfeiff 

Peter  Daniluk  Valent  Potocsui 

Ludvik  David  Earl  J.  Puchert 

Raymond  Deshotels  John  Reed 

■  E.   H.  Rothemberger 

James  Ryan 
Eugene  Sasser 
Hugh  W.  Sawyer 


Cilbert  P.  Cook 
William  A.  Terry 
Walter  J.  Eaton 
Randall  Miller 

Corporals 
Roy  Martin 
Ralph  E.  Corbett 
William  Meuzelaar 
Vernon  P.  Nelson 


Albert  E.  Redig 
Maurice  M.  Barger 
Harry  Powell 
Fred  C.  Ralph 
Bert  A.  Roseland 
Ray  J.  Garbutt 
Theo.  T.  Roseland 
Ralph  E.  Rees 
William  A.  Irvine 
Jesse  V.  Timms 


Joe  Dijohn 
Richard  F.  Golds- 
berry 
Verne  M.  Chamber-  J^f.^..^-  Gonzales 
lain  PhiUipGrubbs 

Robert  T.  Frantz     JTA^'?  ■  u. 
FrankA.WhitcombR^lP'' B.  Kmght 

Ignac  Kaynieky 
Buglers  p^^gsj  g  Kenny 

Clarence  O.  Rich      John  Kern 
Sol  Feigenbaum        John  F.  Layman 
Privates — 1st  Class  Albert  L.  McAlister  George  H.  Turner 
Fred  Alared  WilliamH.McGuire  Bernard  A.  Wadleigh 

William  Boehle        John  Miller  Joseph  Zuba 

George  W.  Boyse     John  Mock 
Karl  Brey  Ralph  R.  Mosher  Pnvates 

Sven  J.  M.  Carlson  William  A.  NefE       Albert  D.  Bacco 


Frank  W.SchoendoUer 
David  W.  Shipman 
Joseph  Simek 
Mike  Spelen 
Lonnie  C.  Stubblefield 
Frank  W.  Susmilck 
Andrew  Topielarz 


Martin  L.  Howard 
Pete  T.  Heffner 
Willie  Baer 
Bill  Balosiotis 
Thomas  Barbo 
Clyde  C.  Barron 
Andrew  Bekalarzcyk 
Elmer  Bright 
Hal  Brown 
Perry  F.  Bruns 
John  T.  Collins 
Flank  H.  Davis 
Levi  Dillow 
Warren  W .  Hotchk  iss 
Forest  L.  Harter 
Frank  W.  Hayak 
Richard  H.  James 
Reuben  W.  Lockett, 

Joseph  Maczulaitis 
Lawless  Martin 
Clyde  Meacham 
Rudolph  K.  Morgan 


Michael  T.  Morris 
Enrico  Mourini 
Myrell  Nelson 
George  A.  Peeck 
Joseph  Pierre 
Artibuse  Richard 
Herman  J.  Rowoldt 
George  Sabanos 
Frutoso  Serna 
Tom  Simpson 
Walter  Simpson 
Louis  Smith 
Rowallen  G. 

Stalker 
Oscar  Stephens 
Harry  G.  Stevens 
Emmitt  W.  Stobs 
John  Wagner 
Alfred  J.  Wenzinger 
Roy  L.  Werner 
Joe  White 


119  ■ 


CAMP    TRAVIS     AND    THE    WORLD    WAR 


Captain  Tracy  L.  Harrel,  Commanding 
1st  Lieut.  WiUiam  H.  Myers 
1st  Lieut.  Edgar  B.  Heylmun 


Sergeants 
Fred  Glass 
William  Lord 
George  Georgandas 
Everett  M.  Moore 
Martin  Powless 
William  S.  Goff 
Frank  J.  Liska 
Eugene  Davenport 
George  H.  Lord 

Corporals 
George  W.  King 
Elmer  DeWerff 
Joseph  Swatek 
Floyd  C.  Sims 
Robt.  G.  Ethridge 
Ebbie  R.  Bedgood 
Dewey  L.  N.  Forgue 


James  H.  Godfrey 
Jack  P.  Edvpards 
Carroll  D.  Funk 
Mart  Weiss 
Thomas  Bilek,  Jr. 
Sczepan  Sekulski 
Harold  W.  Kreger 
John  E.  Cumayn 
Frank  F.  Freeberg 
B.  Zielinski 
George  A.  Quade 
Donald  Barton 
Orpheus  K.  Hendershot 
Roy  Jorgenson 
Omar  G.  Dulany 

Cooks 
Herman  Mirly 
Paul  Jankeje 


COMP.\NY  "B,"  35th  INFANTRY 

1st  Lieut.  Charles  W.  Christenberry 
1st  Lieut.  James  H.  Newberry 
2nd  Lieut.  .Alfred  A.  McNamee 


James  Brzostk 
Clyde  Hawks 

Mechanics 
Jan  Mach 
Richard  L.  Taylor 
Dallas  C.  Raasch 

Buglers 
Franciszek  Czosnyka 
Frank  C.  Gross 

Privates — First  Class 
William  O.  AUen 
Conley  E.  Alton 
David  Bacher 
Joseph  Ball 
Edward  J.  Burns 
Ignascz  Butkiewicz 


Larrel  M.  Clapper 
Roy  Cunningham 
Steve  Danos 
Arthur  Ellis 
Thomas  Genuk 
Lawson  Gilley 
John  Glodek 
.\nthony  Gorie 
Frank  P.  Hardigan 
Acue  R.  Higgason 
Claude  C.  Inman 
Tony  Jodewelky 
Charles  E.  Lawrence 
John  Liba 
Charles  Loughrey 
John  Marcinkowski 
Frank  McGuirk 
Samuel  J.  Sarletto 
.\nge!o  Voltarel 


1st  Sergeant  Hermie  E.  Smith 
Supply  Sergeant  Walter  Scott 
Mess  Sergeant  .\rthur  E.  Gloor 


Branko  Vujcich 
George  V.  Wasilus 
.\ubrey  Welbom 
Frank  Wesnewski 
John  M.  Witkoski 
Joe  Zukowski 

Privates 
Dominik  Anuskiewicz 
Stanley  M.  Baseacki 
Frank  Blonak 
George  T.  Bradley 
John  Brush 
Claude  M.  Campbell 
Tom  Chozempa 
Clarence  Cunningham 
Jesse  E.  Epley 
Emmett  B.  Frizzell 
Lyle  Golden 


Frederick  Greisler 
.\ndrew  Gurak 
Charles  B.  Gursley 
Hans  Hahn 
Albert  J.  Howard 
Burton  N.  Humphries 
Robt.  IngersoU 
Victor  Jakubovitz 
Mike  Janowski 
Jacob  E.  Jeffers 
Carl  H.  Johnson 
John  A.  R.  Johnson 
John  W.  Jones 
Jacob  Kantor 
John  Kitch 
Frank  Koronowski 
Stanley  Krarzewski 
Fred  O.  Larson 
Continued  on  page  ISO 


(120] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


COMPANY  "C,"  35th  INFANTRY 


Sergeants 
Lawrence  E.  Throne 
Ernest  Rolleston 
Roger  J.  Darrow 
Robert  A.  Batista 
Edward  A.  Bidus 
Major  W.  Hancock 
Elisha  Stacy 
Roy  B.  Heilman 

Corporals 
Orvalle  V.  McKinley 
Richard  M.  Phalen 
Bernard  F.  Luhring 
Charles  Skorupa 
Bernard  C.  Carver 
Harry  \V.  Beseau 
Thomas  S.  Jacklin 
Wencil  Krejci 
Cyril  B.  Caldwell 


Captain  T.  E.  D.  Hackney 

Captain  Harry  \'.  Klug 

1st  Lieut.  Hugh  A.  Wear 

1st  Lieut.  Chas.  P.  Whiteman,  Jr. 


1st  Lieut.  Chester  M.  Martin 
First  Sergeant  George  R.  Lucas 
Supply  Sergeant  Clarence  Curnuth 
Mess  Sergeant  George  W.  Pritchett 


Earl  S.  Hudson 
Stewart  H.  Blackhall 
Claude  E.  Dickey 
Guy  W.  Klingel 
Joseph  La  Fleur 
Lane  C.  Trueblood 
Leo  A.  Payne 
William  E.  Pennington 
Ernst  A.  Mauser 

Cooks 
Jacob  Kondly 
Mateiu  I.  Moreriu 
Stephen  L.  Spink 
Charles  W.  Minney 

Mechanics 
.\rmedois  J.  Benjamin 
Oscar  W.  Lay 


Robert  L.  Long 
James  H.  Randolph 

Buglers 
Ernest  J.  Booker 
Howard  E.  Lynch 

Privates — First  Class 
Cranston  F.  Adams 
Nasel  J.  Baroody 
John  T.  Beard 
Ignacy  Bohdiziewicz 
\'ictor  Chubinski 
John  Demchik 
Mike  Dujmovic 
Noah  T.  Hardison 
Glenn  F.  Holcomb 
John  Johnson 
John  Kieras 


James  W.  Kirks 
Jozef  Klis 
Aries  K.  Kovistra 
John  W.  McKee 
Stanislaw  Sikorski 
Joseph  Strobel 

Privates 
Martin  A.  Anderson 
Lloyd  L.  Armstrong 
Charles  J.  Barnhart 
Ernest  Beckstrom 
Frank  G.  Bennett 
Frank  A.  Bochmann 
Ernest  W.  Botefur 
John  D.  Burks 
Walter  A.  Chouinard 
Fountain  Christison 
Thomas  Ciasnocha 
Darwin  Davis 


John  Detcz 
Julius  Devolder 
Claude  B.  Edwards 
William  Ehmckie 
Robert  I.  Fisher 
Harry  J.  Gabriel 
Steve  Galanis 
Emilio  Gallegos 
John  Gavin 
Myron  Gebofski 
Mathias  J.  Guirsch 
Carl  W.  Hanichen 
Parry  G.  Harbelis   . 
Carl  R.  Hefftner 
Owen  F.  Heyden 
James  L.  Higginbotham 
WUUam  H.  Hill 
Charles  L.  Jordan 
Joseph  Kayden 
Continued  on  page  150 


121 


CAMP    TRAVIS     AND    THE     WORLD     WAR 


COMPANY  "D,"  35th  INFANTRY 

Captain  Charles  L.  Steel     Captain  Kearney  Barker    1st  Lieut.  Thomas  P.  Barry    1st  Lieut.  Jesse  F.  Wentz     1st  Lieut.  Fred  B.  Nisbet 

1st  Lieut  Amett  Norcott        1st  Sergeant  Harry  B.  Allen        Mess  Sergeant  Alfred  Woods        Supply  Sergeant  Harrj'  Lauer 


Sergeants • 

Joseph  Tietelman 
Frank  Underwood 
Peter  Jorgensen 
Clyde  Grain 
Louis  Kurtz 
Clements  Schwarting 
John  J.  Reis 
Arthur  Warrgow 
Nicholas  Shomin 
Rodney  M.  Tate 
Glenn  Arthurs 

Corporals 

John  V.  Randies 
Frederick  L.  Bauldry 
Cecil  M.  Baucus 
Sidney  G.  Bartlett 
Felidan  L.  Schiltz 


John  J.  Tobin 
Charles  W.  Woods 
Rene  DeVusser 
Dwight  Gordon 
Roy  A.  Scott 
Carl  R.  Dennis 
Alexander  Hochman 
Fred  Knollho£f 
Thomas  Besau 
George  F.  Shafer 
Peter  Mastic 
Joseph  Koski 
Mayro  C.  Cox 
Roman  Drocz>Tiski 
George  Flucus 
Arthur  A.  Koch 
Henry  G.  Jarmuth 
Pearl  Morss 
Andrew  J.  Gillespie 


Mechanics 
Wesley  T.  Parson 
Fred  Schumacher 
John  L.  Shortt 

Cooks 
Troy  L.  Smith 
Chester  L.  .\ten 
Edward  M.  Freburg 
John  Grabarcyk 

Buglers 
Francis  H.  L.  Sprague 
James  E.  Hall 

Privates — First  Class 
William  S.  Allen 
Dimitru  Bancion 
Mike  Bear 
Edward  J.  Cuff 


Garry  L.  Da\n? 
.\lbert  C.  Domquast 
.\lex  Grabow?ki 
Henry  H.  Kehmeier 
Richard  Kistler 
Joseph  Konik 
John  C.  Konopa 
Edward  La  Fave 
Walter  Magill 
Walter  B.  JIatthes 
John  M.  McDermott 
William  J.  Jloritz 
Loui=  G.  MulUngs 
Fred  Xeff 
Heiman  Oja 
Frank  Paszczak 
Wojciech  Pietraszek 
Walter  Sieczkowski 
John  White 
Frank  W.  Witrv 


Privates 
Edward  R.  Anderson 
Stanley  .■Vndruczvk 
Roy  J.  Beebe 
Charles  E.  Bennett 
Henry  Biersdorf 
William  H.  Brigner 
Bert  E.  Brigham 
John  Bueb 
.M\Tn  S.  Butler 
John  W.  Carlson 
William  Carlon 
Mike  Caylor 
Benjamin  Cordova 
.Albert  Dadisman 
John  Dighera 
Chris  Dukas 
Patrick  J.  Durkin 
Albert  E.  Elofson 

Continued  on  page  195 


[122] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


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[123; 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


COMPANY   "F,"  35th  INFANTRY 


Captain  Donald  M.  Bartow 


1st  Lieut.  Leo  W.  Glaze 


1st  Sergeant  Charles  C.  Conway 


1st  Lieut.  Quaite  Dodson 


Sergeants 
Wilson  Cower       Lee  R.  Wallace 


Noble  Deaver 
Fred  J.  Butler 
John  Wojcik 
Kaz  Skubeck 


James  E.  Williams 
Emory  E.  Snyder 
Vem  Thompson 
Joseph  Wallace 


Corporals 
Edward  J.  Gilboy 
King  R.  Heltsley 
Albert  Petzold 
Joe  A.  Phillips 
Charles  B.  Lingenfield 


Mess  Sergeant  James  H.  Burns 

MerUn  W.  Snyder 
Lloyd  Bealer 
Calogero  Lianza 
George  B.  Green 
Dale  C.  Mead 
Paul  T.  Sander 


2nd  Lieut.  Joseph  Geeraerts 


Supply  Sergeant  Linn  R.  Johnson 
Warner  O.  Schoyen  Leslie  F.  Voigtmann 


Marvin  B.  Freeman 
William  Kavech 
Albin  Suchwalko 
John  Purchla 
Henry  A.  Butler 


Zeke  Pirraglio 
John  Wicker 
Frank  B.  Irwin 

Continued  on  page  B04 


124] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


Captain  James  A.  Hasson 
1st  Sergeant  Charles  L.  Rodgers 


COMPANY  "G,"  35th  INFANTRY 

1st  Lieut.  George  P.  Seneff 
Mess  Sergeant  Michel  Murin 


» 


Sergeants 

John  L.  Thompson 
Earl  C.  Criner 
Harry  Tugendhaft 
Frederick  C.  Goodwin 
Everett  Vinyard 
Edward  Scheve 

Corporals 

Robin  Baker 
James  A.  Branum 
Frank  Murray 
Joseph  F.  Ruks 
Francis  N.  Ritter 
Lester  N.  Short 
Rudolph  Chillo 
Lawrence  Waugh 
Richard  P.  Welch 
Alpheus  Sloan 
John  T  Myers 
John  Macaloni 
Harry  L.  Light 
Oliver  E.  Martin 
Leslie  W.  Morrow 
George  E.  Prosise 
Silas  C.  Villines 
Garrie  M.  Hostetter 
Harry  L.  Johnson 
George  Oslar 


James  P.  Roe 
John  F.  Stank 
Walter  A.  Moore 
Joseph  G.  Friedman 
William  E.  Murray 
Charles  W.  Brewer 

Mechanics 

Joseph  Salumsky 
Charles  A  Stout 
Harry  R.  Jordon 
Eugene  Gulick 

Cooks 

Alfred  Sipe 
William  Adam 
Rudolph  Kosmrl 
Thomas  F.  Donahue 

Bugler 

Peter  Daprano 

Privates — First  Class 

Walter  Appellof 
John  E.  Crape 
Frank  Majka 
George  R.  Marichevich 
Ernest  W.  Moore 
Peter  Niziolek 


Paul  Skorkowski 
James  Swerczynski 
Abie  Toybin 

Privates 

Sol.  Abrams 
Ernest  J.  Amick 
.Sigward  Anderson 
Harry  G.  Atchison 
Peter  H.  Ball 
William  C.  Beam 
Earl  L.  Bennett 
Fritz  C.  Blei 
Lee  F.  Booth 
Marcus  C.  Bosco 
Walter  L.  Boyanton 
Herman  Bruns 
William  F.  Carter 
Charlie  B.  Cassell 
Arnold  Daugaard 
John  J.  Deegan 
Bradley  A  Diltz 
Carl  H.  Diltz 
Theodore  J.  Dreger 
Felix  H.  Feliszak 
John  E.  Freel 
Jacob  L.  Galer 
William  E.  Gimbel 
Carl  A.  Hendrickson 


1st  Lieut.  Thomas  E.  Martin 
Supply  Sergeant  Michael  Baranowsky 


Harry  S.  Hunt 
Herman  Ihous 
.\braham  Jacobs 
Earnest  Jackson 
Alvin  Jones 
Maurice  T.  Kensell 
Anton  F.  Konopasek 
John  Kopczynski 
Max  Kurey 
Chailes  A  Leitzau 
Walter  Lenda 
Tommy  Lesner 
Tommy  Lucas 
Archibald  K.  Lyttle 
Giuseppe  Mariconi 
Francisco  Martinez 
Max  May 
William  Melcher 
Floyd  E.  Murphy 
Ira  Nelson 
George  W.  Norton 
James  F.  Ormston 
Harold  B.  Owen 
Polinar  Pacheco 
John  P  Palach 
Tomasz  Palacz 
John  Pavelo 
Dominico  Pecararo 
Stanley  Piasecki 
Homer  F.  Plain 


James  E.  Porter 
Olmond  L.  Poutry 
Victor  H.  Price 
Augustin  Raica 
James  E.  Roach 
John  Rucienski 
Vivian  Sanchez 
William  F.  H.  Schieve 
Gust  Schiewe 
Charles  L.  Scherer 
Leo  L  Schmidt 
Walter  Short 
Charles  Sligg 
Philip  Smith 
Edward  L  Sowder 
Claude  L.  Spencer 
Fred  Steines 
Harrv  J.  Stephens 
Fred'G.  StoU 
John  Strange 
Nicholas  Stonfa 
Arthur  W.  Swofford 
Claus  F.  Trede 
Ben  Udelevitz 
Carl  Vanauken 
Edward  T.  Wade 
Julius  E.  Weirich 
Otto  Wrede 
Stanislaw  Wiswiowski 
Walter  Wolntinoviez 


;W 


^*v3^ 


«       H 


*B*  ~h< 


125' 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


l^ 


—   _  1-  f    .*  -^-^    a    -4-  ^ 


COMPANY      H,     ;ioth  INFANTRY 

Captian  R.  J.  Marshburn  1st  Lieut.  O.  W.  Fannin  1st  Lieut.  D.  \.  Turner  1st  Lieut.  F.  C.  Horner 

1st  Sergeant  Charles  Cummings  Supply  Sergeant  Frank  (ilonek  Mess  Sergeant  John  Randall 


Sergeants 
Umile  Gencarelli 
James  Prow 
Earnest  Juneman 
Howard  Johnson 
Louis  Cais 
Peter  Freyborg 
Er\'in  O'Brjant 
Leon  Greenberg 
James  Caldwell 

Corporals 

Henrj-  Bolz 
James  Oliver 
Dewey  Dooley 
Richard  Walters 
Milford  May 
James  McCauIey 
James  Crow 
Robert  Davidson 
George  Duraont 
Ben  Connor 
Redgie  Edwards 
Joseph  V'onasek 
Harold  Page 
Frank  Christopher 
Stanley  Findysz 
Jack  Sandy 
Ray  Young 


Laveme  Denio 
Jeremiah  Heller 
.Arthur  Israel 
Edward  Kennedy 
Charles  Posledni 

Cooks 

Joe  Ledford 
\"ernon  Pinkerton 
Ed.  Hodge 
Jesse  Niswonger 

Buglers 

Peter  Begu 
Charlie  Smith 

Privates — First  Class 

William  .\lbers 
Mike  Beader 
Stanley  Bonkowski 
Nicklos  Budai 
Frank  Carroll 
Gura  Cizmas 
John  Cuplin 
Emile  Dupire 
James  Finney 
Hilmar  Gautwick 
Harry  Hoger 


George  Jennings 
Rzasa  John 
Richard  McDonald 
-\Ibert  Mueller 
-Arthur  Nesvacil 
Robert  Rowan 
Alfred  Schultz 
James  Shemwell 
George  Wandelt 
Joseph  Wagner 
Reider  Cappelen 
Joe  Semerad 

Privates 
George  Abendroth 
Martin  .\nderson 
Nickolas  Baumhart 
Constantine  Brahos 
James  Bronge 
James  Cahill 
Walter  Carlson 
Joe  Caruso 
Mathias  Cayner 
Walter  Corson 
Leonardo  Corvello 
Herman  Dems 
Raymond  Douville 
George  Drews 
John  Evaunski 
Levi  Ellison 


Abraham  Finder 
Clarence  Fordyce 
Stanley  Frontzak 
Frank  Furi 
Ignatz  Gorka 
Charles  Grebe 
Joseph  Gudinowicz 
Frank  Grzych 
Waldemar  Hansen 
Henry  Hefty 
John  Huskowski 
Harr>'  Johnson 
Edward  Kolar 
George  Kubis 
Eric  Larson 
Joe  Laurienti 
Marion  Lee 
.\nko  Lindemulder 
.\lphonso  Lisewski 
John  McCarthy 
George  Miller 
Thomas  Munley 
George  N'arbuntas 
Andrew  O'Donnell 
Roger  O'Malia 
Frank  Ouimette 
Stanislau  Ourewicz 
Peter  Ozuk 
FelLx  Paszkiewicz 
George  Raabe 


John  Raszeja 
Hubert  Reynolds 
Henr)-  Roesner 
Feli.x  Rozmairek 
George  Santilippo 
Joseph  Schneiderman 
Henry  Schulze 
.Mbert  Schwarer 
Benjamin  Shapiro 
Henrj'  Sloot 
Edward  Steinbring 
Arthur  Strandt 
Grover  Strange 
Charles  Sykes 
Barney  Tatum 
Rehm  Thielecke 
\'irgle  Tyree 
Frank  Utpadel 
Fernando  \'aldez 
Fred  \"egter 
Herman  Will 
Henry  Winkelman 
Henrj-  Wyma 
Peter  Zeman 
Peter  Zinudski 

Mechanics 
James  Rogers 
Thomas  Onorato 
Marco  Bradic 


126 


CAMP    TRAVIS    AND    THE    WORLD    WAR 


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[127] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


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128 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


COMPANY  "L,"  35th  INFANTRY 


Captain  Lara  P.  Good 
Captain  Rpbert  C.  Gregory 
1st  Lieut.  William  H.  Duncan 


1st  Lieut.  Allan  Lucas 

1st  Lieut.  Jay  Hays 

2nd  Lieut.  George  H.  Sharman 


Sergeants 

Felix  Armijo 

Eugenio  Frigo 

Leroy  C.  Baker 

Albert  Corapton 
James  I.  Jones 
Judson  Langston 

Robert  F.  Ward 

Joseph  Fyalkowski 

Hyman  Bernstein 

Wladyslaw  Ganczak 

Harry  Blackwell 

Cooks 

Hosef  Gotab 

Henry  Bolt 

Mack  Long 
Ila  A.  Dossett 

Liner  Gooch 

Alexander  R.  Hill 

Martin  Borrego 

Frank  Pine 

Stanislaw  Huchro 

David  A.  Bowsher 

Louis  A.  Koski 

Robert  F.  Hanna 

Anton  Jankowski 

John  A.  Breach 

Andrew  Jaworski 

David  T.  Wolfgang 

Tadeusz  Jezefowski 

Preston  Bryan 

James  E.  Cox 
Joseph  F.  Jerabek 
Jerome  L.  Beatty 

Frauczik  Krolikowski 

Ysabel  M.  Castenada 

Bugler 

James  V.  Malone 

Santa  Ceretta 

Harry  Bucks 

Mark  Matyas 

Benjamin  D.  Churchwell 

John  Meeuwis 

Daniel  P.  Daly 

Mechanics 

Stanley  Morwicki 

Forest  David 

Corporals 

William  L.  Smith 

Phil  Moscinski 

John  Dehner 

Clarence  Ellis 

Robert  B.  Miller 

Joseph  Niziolek 

Ernest  M.  Eastin 

Joe  Dupont 

Barnard  Dulka 

Wincenty  Pietruszewski 

Henry  F.  Fippenger 

Edward  Gunderson 

Sa  Dutton 

Adam  Politowicz 

John  J.  FoUender 

John  Gold 

Vincenzo  Rea 

Joseph  B.  Frederick 

Ross  H.  Fuquay 

Privates — First  Class 

Alexander  Sadejko 

Anthony  J.  Frey 

Louis  A.  Kenny 

Adolph  Abramski 

Szymon  Tracz 

Lindsey  Gibson 

Clarence  F.  Rosewald 

Herbert  W.  Arbra 

Richard  L.  Travis 

Delbert  Granger 

Joseph  Novak 

Alfred  Barsanti 

Tony  Wojcik 

CharUe  Hair 

John  Murray 

Michel  Barteszuk 

George  W.  Halfpeimy 

Walter  A.  Ottow 

Clyde  Byars 

Privates 

Joseph  Havel 

Cecil  J.  Fosburgh 

Charles  Conley 

Emil  F.  Heinrichs 

George  H.  Gold 

John  Demos 

Luther  Averett 

Claude  Helms 

August  Gallagher 

WiUiam  F.  Dodson 

Henry  Baebler 

James  A.  Hofif 

Charles  B.  Thorington 

Henry  R.  Eaton 

Thomas  Baikie 

Albert  J.  Horcher 

Enoch  Naukry 

Mike  EUer 

Claude  P.  Baker 

George  F.  Hunt 

1st  Sergeant  Charles  E.  Jenkins 
Mess  Sergeant  James  W.  B-own 
Supply  Sergeant  William  A.  Cook 


Robert  Jackson 
Bennie  C.  Johnson 
Gabriel  Johnson 
Charlie  Kirsak 
Otto  F.  Klockgeter 
Dominik  Kochanski 
John  D.  Lind 
Carlos  Lovato 
David  W.  Malin 
Diego  Montanio 
Joseph  R.  Montgomery 
WiUiam  H.  Moore 
George  Moser 
Carlos  Perea 
Herman  W.  S.  Robinson 
Walter  H.  Rolo£E 
William  A.  Ross 
Richard  Runge 
Victor  A.  Sanchez 
Harry  Shoemaker 
Herman  Simon 
Pete  Stelleveara 
Leo  A.  Sullivan 
John  W.  Summer 
Thomas  E.  Vaughan 
Joseph  Watt 
Jason  L.  Wilson 
Joseph  Zuazry 
Andy  Zvijak 


129 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


COMPANY  "M,"  35th  IXFAXTRV 


Captain  Thomas  H.  Scott 
1st  Lieut.  Thomas  B.  Steel 
1st  Lieut.  Hugh  M.  Evans 


1st  Lieut.  Zigmunt  Yesson 
1st  Lieut.  John  R.  Phelan 
2nd  Lieut.  Herbert  B.  Williams 


1st  Sergeant  Bert  Plummer 
Supply  Sergeant  Alexander  Reguly 
Mess  Sergeant  Daniel  Foley 


Sergeants 
Joseph  M.  Connaughton 
Delphis  Berard 
Caleb  G.  Bloomfield 
Elmer  Cox 
^'incent  A.  Rvan 
HaUet  M.  Whelan 
Bruce  M.  Nichols 
Harry  R.  Wilson 
Ray  Gilbert 
Joseph  Constany 
Lealon  L.  Winscoff 
James  E.  Freeman 

Corporals 
Charles  F.  Andris 
William  Virden 
Lawrence  Minor 
Rudolph  A.  Brummond 
Dorance  L.  Armstrong 
Clay  Burruss 
Robert  E.  Wilson 
Robert  E.  N.  Jensen 
Alex,  .\nderson 
Willie  King 
Grover  Lomax 
Asa  V.  Backus 
WilUam  H.  Nirschl 
Cecil  D.  Smith 


Edward  Murphy 
Homer  E.  Makinson 
George  Ondrus 
Grover  J.  Kenney 
John  C.  Heffeman 
Roland  C.  Byrum 
George  E.  Bush 
Robert  E.  Lauman 
Eugene  G.  Heller 
Forrest  G.  Knee 
Samuel  H.  Goiter 
Jens  K.  Jensen 
John  B.  Jungblut 
.\1  A.  Otto 
George  Wieland 
Philip  H.  Young 
Arthur  G.  Pahike 

Cooks 
Edward  M.  Bienvenu 
Otis  R.  Clark 
Alton  D.  Ashley 
August  Kerl 

Mechanics 
Stanley  A.  Petzold 
Joseph  Kepka 
Paul  Mison 
Hugo  Schuknecht 


Bugler — First  Class 
Mike  Pawlowski 

Bugler 
Charles  D.  Firebaugh 

Privates — First  Class 
Basil  C.  Cannon 
Charley  M.  Cook 
Adolph  P.  Depke 
William  M.  Even 
Frank  J.  Howard 
Walentz  Klonica 
Mike  Letasi 
James  H.  Lewis 
Joe  Marta 

Guiseppenicolo  Mezzacappo 
John  L.  Munn 
Welby  C.  Murry 
George  W.  Rawlinson 
Alexander  Taylor 
.\lbert  S.  Thomas 
Achiel  J.  Van  Ootegham 
Merrideth  O.  Weikle 
Lennie  W.  Whitcomb 
John  Yurask 

Privates 
Harry  L.  Anderson 
Robert  E.  .\ndruss 


John  E.  Blaszczak 
Frank  S.  Cer\'enka 
Joseph  Ciapolo 
Bram  S.  Clark 
WilUam  Clark 
\'an  Cline 
Harry  L.  Cooper 
Harry  Craig 
George  B.  Cross 
John  Cvetkovich 
Wasyl  Doman 
Herbert  C.  J.  Edney 
John  J.  Elwart 
Gustave  C.  Enberg 
Albert  H.  Fortier 
Henr>-  M.  Fortier 
Hugh  T.  Garrison 
Charles  Geisel 
Frank  Gratke 
Bernard  F.  Groth 
Henry  J.  Hartkopf 
Witold  JaroszyTiski 
Mahlon  F.  Jones 
Jacob  J.  Kackert,  Jr. 
George  H.  Kaiser 
Harry  N.  Katsan 
William  E.  Keegan 
Dan  Kelley 
.\ugust  W.  Klevesahl 


Henry  A.  Knutzen 
Frank  Krent 
Joseph  Kryml 
Joseph  Laskowski 
William  Leverentz 
Kazmir  Monusko 
Frank  .\.  Muza 
Harry  Nathan 
Paul  Nortadian 
Frederick  Nottoli 
Joseph  J.  Novak 
William  Poltrock 
Edmund  O.  A.  Rask 
Otto  F.  Rose 
.■\rnold  Schlachter 
.Arthur  J.  Smith 
Joseph  A.  Specht 
Wilbur  J.  Speidel 
Albert  Stetka 
Wilfred  H.  Stiegemeier 
James  J.  Sullivan 
Stanley  Szymanski 
Robert  Taylor 
Bert  N.  Tintner 
Joseph  F.  Totzke 
Dewey  VoUmar 
Larence  Wabia 
Edward  A.  Weinand 
Hushel  A.  Wilson 


[130] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


I 


MEDICAL  DETACHMENT,  3.5th  INFANTRY 


Captain  George  G.  Fitz  1st  Lieut.  Roy  W.  Quick 

Captain  Arthur  C.  Rhine  1st  Lieut.  Bascon  Lynn 

First  Class  Sergeant  Alvah  Buhl 


Sergeants 

William  G.  Elkins 
James  A.  Hamilton 
Thomas  J.  Malloy 


Privates — First  Class 

William  J.  Anderson 
Albert  B.  Cain 
George  O.  Gamer 
Louis  E.  Hitt 
Henry  H.  Landman 


Privates 
Helge  G.  Arvidson 
Hugh  C.  Bowdon 
Paul  P.  Clegg 
Clinton  Daville 
Jacob  D.  Holt  (Att.) 
Jack  Martin 
James  W.  Nance 
Robert  O.  Steen 
Fred  J.  Steiger 
Lyle  Tarpley 
Alonzo  C.  L.  Weitzel 
Benjamin  T.  Wells 
Robert  A.  Wright 


131 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


EIGHTY- SIXTH  INFANTRY 

A  Regiment  of  Spirit  and  a  Record  of  Achievement 


ONE  thinks  of  the  history  of  a  regiment  in  terms  of  a 
record  of  facts  and  traditions  to  which  it  becomes 
an  heir  through  the  years  of  a  long  and  active  past. 
Such  a  record  is  both  realistic  and  imaginative:  realistic  to 
the  extent  of  the  actual  engagements  of  the  regiment  in 
line  of  military  duty;  imaginative  to  the  extent  of  some 
warrior's  fancies  with  which  he  clothes  the  accounts  of 
the  activities  of  his  regiment  as  he  proudly  relates  them. 
The  history  of  the  younger  regiments  which  had  their  birth 
from  the  imperative  necessity  of  the  hour  just  past  is  not 
adorned  with  such  traditions.  However,  theirs  is  no  less 
a  record  of  achievement  characterized  by  the  spirit  and 
morale  of  true  soldierly  conduct  and  attainment.  Such 
is  the  record  we  claim. 

The  initiatory  organization  of  the  regiment  took  place 
at  Camp  Travis,  with  Lieut.-Col.  John  V.  Spring,  Jr.,  in 
command.  Colonel  Spring  came  to  us  from  the  cavalry. 
His  first  military  service  was  with  the  Coast  Artillery 
Corps  which  he  entered  in  1902.  In  this  branch  of  the 
service  he  served  for  a  year  with  the  Army  of  Occupation 
in  Cuba.  From  the  artillery  he  went  to  the  Seventh 
Cavalry  with  which  he  saw  twelve  years  service,  six  years 
of  which  was  TOth  his  organization  in  the  Philippine 
Islands.  He  went  to  France  in  October,  1917,  with  the 
Third  Cavalry.  After  ten  months  of  active  service  in 
France,  he  was  ordered  to  the  Eighteenth  Division  at 
Camp  Travis  where  he  took  command  of  the  Eighty-sixth 
Infantry  on  August  31,  1918. 

In  the  process  of  our  growth,  we  were  subjected  to  read- 
justments which  were  disconcerting  in  the  extreme.  But 
everyone  accepted  the  readjustments  as  a  matter  of  course 
in  military  routine  and  refused  to  slacken  in  the  work  of 
training.  So  intensive  was  the  training  and  so  thorough 
was  the  instruction  given  during  this  period,  that  just 
three  weeks  after  its  primal  organization  the  regiment  was 
commended  by  the  Commanding  General  of  the  camp  as 
making  the  best  showing  of  any  which  passed  before  him  in 
the  first  divisional  review  held  by  the  Eighteenth  Division. 

Very  soon  after  this  review.  Col.  Robert  H.  Sillman 
took  command  of  the  regiment.  Colonel  Sillman  was 
born  in  New  York  City,  May  9,  1862.  He  began  his 
miUtary  career  on  February  28, 1879,  as  a  volimteer  in  the 
Thirteenth  Infantry,  National  Guard  of  New  York. 
Within  this  period  of  service,  he  received  instruction  at  the 
United  States  Military  Academy  at  West  Point.  Upon 
his  separation  from  the  service  of  the  New  York  National 
Guard,  he  enlisted  in  the  National  Guard  of  Michigan 
where  he  served  from  1889  to  1898  with  high  rank  on  the 
staffs  of  Generals  Hawley  and  Lyons,  General  Robinson, 
and  Governor  Rich.  On  May  30,  1898,  he  enUsted  in  the 
Astor  Battery,  with  which  unit  he  went  to  the  Philippine 
Islands,  where  he  saw  active  service.  In  the  engagement 
before  Manila  on  August  13,  1898,  he  was  wounded.  Of 
this  event  the  ofScial  records  give  this  testimony:  "Sergt. 
R.  H.  Sillman,  Astor  Battery,  who  was  shot  in  the  knee 
while  gallantly  taking  part  in  a  charge  having  been  called 
for  by  the  brigadier  general  commanding,  is  recommended 


for  a  Medal  of  Honor  for  distinguished  gallantry  in  the 
combat  of  Singalong,  as  described  by  his  battery  com- 
mander." After  being  mustered  out  of  this  service,  he 
was  commissioned  second  lieutenant  in  the  Twenty-sixth 
U.  S.  Volunteer  Infantry  and  continued  his  service  in  the 
Philippines  for  three  years.  Within  this  time  he  organ- 
ized and  commanded  the  Visayan  Scouts  in  Panay  Island. 
In  1901  he  was  mustered  out  of  the  volunteers  and  com- 
missioned first  lieutenant  of  infantry  in  the  U.  S.  Army. 
In  this  branch  of  the  service,  he  has  received  his  successive 
promotions  and  has  seen  special  service  in  these  several 
capacities:  acting  military  attache,  Peking,  China;  Intel- 
ligence Office,  Southern  Department;  Inspector  Instructor 
National  Guard,  Twelfth  Provisional  Division;  member  of 
General  Staff  at  Washington  to  which  he  was  detailed  on 
March  21,  1918.  While  he  was  on  this  duty,  he  received 
his  appointment  as  colonel  of  infantry.  On  September  7, 
1918,  he  was  relieved  from  duty  with  the  General  Stafif 
and  assigned  to  his  present  command. 

We  were  delighted  to  find  in  our  new  leader  a  man  of 
varied  tastes.  While  he  was  firm  in  having  the  program 
of  intensive  training  strictly  compUed  with  he  was  de- 
termined that  the  routine  of  drill  should  not  dull  the  spirit 
of  the  men.  To  this  end  he  did  not  allow  the  athletic 
side  of  the  military  program  to  be  neglected.  Such  was 
the  interest  shown  in  athletics,  that  in  a  short  time  a  regi- 
mental field  meet  was  arranged.  This  was  the  first 
regimental  meet  held  in  the  division.  To  add  to  the 
interest,  each  company  of  the  regiment  was  asked  to  stage 
some  special  stunt.  At  the  remembrance  of  some  of  these, 
who  would  not  smile!  The  Bolsheviki  and  Czecho- 
slovaks, flying  their  gaudy  colors  and  brandishing  their 
formidable  weapons  of  the  domestic  type,  passed  in  review 
before  their  brilliant  leaders,  and  were  afterward  brought 
to  a  clash  in  a  heated  pitched  battle  which  resulted  in  the 
complete  overthrow  of  the  Bolsheviki.  The  first  meet 
aroused  an  interest  in  athletics  which  was  maintained. 
When  the  eleven  was  selected  to  represent  the  division  on 
the  gridiron,  our  regiment  had  the  honor  of  furnishing 
three  men  to  the  team,  namely,  Sergeant  Lamb  and 
Corporal  Tally,  of  Headquarters  Company,  and  Private 
Burbaker,  of  "A"  Company. 

We  came  together  as  an  ofi^ering  to  the  cause  of  Liberty 
in  the  earth;  we  shall  return  rejoicing  in  its  triumph.  We 
came  flushed  with  the  hope  of  seeing  active  service  in  the 
struggle;  as  that  was  not  ours  to  claim,  we  shall  waive  the 
disappointment  and  return  glad  of  the  little  we  have  given. 
We  feel  with  General  Leonard  Wood  that:  "One  who  has 
willingly  and  loyally  responded  to  the  call  to  arms,  and 
who  has  put  his  best  efforts,  mental  and  physical,  into  the 
training,  and  performed  all  military  duties  required  of 
him  to  the  best  of  his  ability,  standing  ready  always  to 
make  the  supreme  sacrifice  of  his  life,  if  need  be,  has  done 
all  that  a  good  soldier  and  citizen  could  do  to  insure  the 
successful  prosecution  of  the  war."  In  such  a  spirit  we 
take  our  leave  ready  to  return  to  the  colors  of  our  country 
in  any  hour  of  her  need. 


1321 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


Major  John  Keliher 
Major  Guy  C.  Fenner 
Major  Henry  L.  Baker 
2nd  Lieut.  Richard  E.  Bradley 


COLONEL  SILLMAN  AND  STAFF,  SCth  L\F. 

Left  to  right: 

1st  Lieut.  Ralph  H.  Homan 
Major  Henry  V.  de  Hority 
Colonel  Robert  H.  Sillman 
Capt.  Harry  G.  Martin 
Capt.  Alvin  C.  Hope 


1st  Lieut.  Charles  R.  Gress 
Chaplain  Acker  C.  Miller 
1st  Lieut.  Robert  H.  Feltner 
1st  Lieut.  William  E.  Heaton 


133 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


HEADQUARTERS  COMPANY,  86th  INFANTRY 


1st  Lieut.  Caspar  R.  Crim 
1st  Lieut.  Clinton  L.  LeRoy 
1st  Lieut.  James  C.  Fitzpatrick 
Regimental  Sergeant  Major  Chas.  A.  Davis 
Regimental  Sergeant  Major  Chas.  C.  Cannon 


.Sergeants 

Ransom  R.  Kennicolt 
Elmer  F.  Schoner 
Geo.  R.  Barger 
Herschel  B.  Brown 
Otto  Celestino 
Elmer  Christofferson 
Melvin  M.  Currier 
Lewis  A.  Hawkins 
Robt.  E.  Hawkins 
Estes  Lamb 
Pearl  .\.  Scott 
Sidnc\'  W.  Taprcll 
Jas.  V.  Tysl 

Corporals 

Fred  R.  .\chor 

Sam  H.  Benton  (Mail) 

Chancy  E.  Berry 

Ira  V.Blue 

Arthur  C.  Brash  (Mail) 

Jas.  S.  Brown 

Madison  Bullock 

Mack  B.  Carwile 

Wilbur  C.  Clough 


Jay  E.  Conklin 
Chas.  E.  Corbin 
Jens.  L.  Damgaard 
Allen  E.  Dunster 
AUie  Gardner 
Wra.  E.  Gobleman 
Geo.  .'\.  Hawkins 
Gregor  Hegler 
Geo.  Ingles 
Horace  E.  Johnson 
Chas.  Kolesiak 
Frederick  C.  Krueger 
Seth  W.  Lauchner 
John  E.  Mciscnheldcr 
Irvin  H.  Monroe 
Harold  B.  McKinncy 
Marvin  F.  Nichols 
Wm.  Schumann 
Alvy  Talley 
MeHton  Trujillo 
Wm.  A.  Tucker 
Russell  D.  Turner 
Lawrence  E.  Winters 

Mechanics 
Chas.  T.  .\nderson 


Regimental  Sergeant  Major  Fred  C.  Kuehl 
Battalion  Sergeant  Major  Tiedmont  G.  Bell 
BattaUon  Sergeant  Major  Robt.  C.  Lehman 
Battalion  Sergeant  Major  Ray  W.  Veale 
Color  Sergeant  .\lbert  R.  Eckhardt 
Color  Sergeant  Peter  M.  Joze 


1st  Sergeant  Fred  .A.  Merrill 
Supply  Sergeant  J>ouis  .\.  Raeke 
Stable  .Sergeant  Paul  B.  Aregood 
Orderly  Sergeant  Ewing  C.  Brinkley 
Mail  Sergeant  Geo.  E.  Bucks 


Harry  L.  Holland 
Jerry  C.  Moon 

Horseshoer 
Geo.  Schmidt 

Privates — First  Class 
Harve  L.  Beach 
Edwin  A.  Benedict 
.Arthur  E.  Blancy 
Michael  J.  Brennan 
Charlie  T.  Brown 
Ralph  R.  Courtright 
Phillip  Daley 
John  .V.  Darnofall 
Lcons  O.  Downs 
John  Drenseck 
Christian  P.  Ebersole 
Chas.  Fay 
Paul  F.  Frost 
Emery  Gardner 
Perry  C.  Gray 
John  L.  Grimes 
Patrick  Hnrty 
Robt.  C.  Horton 
Glenn  C.  Jones 
Harold  H.  K  raver 


Walter  B.  Locke 
Edward  Melsh 
John  R.  Miller 
John  E.  Moore 
Wm.  L.  Nelson 
Arthur  C.  Nord 
.Albert  J.  Obertheim 
Thos.  C.  Owen 
Edward  O.  Pulliam 
William  Ray 
Hugh  D.  Record 
lirnest  A.  Sams 
David  J.  Shay 
Lawrence  C.  Sheffield 
Elmer  Slice 
.Ansel  H.  Strait 
Leonard  C.  Sullivan 
Geo.  Tanasku 
Jas.  C.  Wall 
Lawrence  A.  Warriner 

Privates 
Chas.  Ackerson 
Wendell  H.  Brickert 
Joseph  Bruck 
Re.x  Bruebaker 
Earl  Brvan 


Temple  Carlton 
John  E.  Cason 
Constant  Cheney 
James  W.  Colby 
Clarence  N.  Cole 
Wm.  N.  Cole 
Earl  D.  Cooley 
John  Costello 
Thos.  J.  Cowan 
Ethra  Curtis 
Chas.  J.  Davis 
Wells  F.  Derringlon 
Harold  Dybwad 
Clarence  C.  Eddleman 
Virgil  L.  Finch 
John  W.  Gleaves 
Wm.  A.  Gowd}- 
Glenn  Harrison 
.Arthur  L.  Hearing 
Frank  W.  King 
Cecil  V.  Kishpaugli 
Isador  H.  Levinthal 
Chester  I.  Little- 
.Anton  Lowak 
John  W.  Mathieson 
Aug.  G.  Meyer 
.Arthur  C.  Minor 


Frank  Mohel 
Earl  W.  Morrill 
Richard  Murphy 
Chas.  Myers 
Thos.  L.  McDonald 
Carroll  E.  Neve 
Jas.  R.  Pardonner 
Arthur  Peachey 
Bruno  Pfullman 
Wm.  F.  Ponder 
General  W.  Pound 
Cecilio  Ramirez 
Clyde  O.  Richards 
Donald  Roberts 
Harold  R.  Seibert 
David  H.  Smith 
John  D.  Stachura 
Clivey  H.  Sullivan 
Carl  H.  Tapp 
Jas.  C.  Taylor 
John  H.  R.  Taylor 
Walter  B.  Teleck 
Herman  L.  Wendt 
John  B.  Whitney 
Cecil  C.  Williams 
Frank  E.  Wolfe 
John  W.  Gamble 


134 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


I 


MACHINE  GUN  COMPANY,  S6th  INFANTRY 


Cs 

tptain  Thomas  L.  McCarthy 

1st  Lieut.  George  X.  Rucker 

Sergeants 

Sigur  H.  Hilleboe 

Harry  Boswoith 

Henry  .-X.  Sanders 

Leslie  H.  Bowling 

Alex.  Jarocki 

John  Campion 

Edmond  R.  Smith 

Otto  F.  Seiford 

Thomas  Pearse 

John  Cesmovar 

Joseph  J.  Splitt 

John  H.  Colev 

Paul  J.  Ryan 

Max  C.  Freeman 

William  Unger 

Patrick  Costello 

Charles  L.  Sumnei 

Edward  C.  Fuller 

Hubert  J.  Varner 

Orin  H.  Richardson 

Leonard  M.  Hudson 

Walter  S.  Williams 

Lonnie  C.  Williamson 

Privates 

Henry  G.  Martens 

Emmit  W.  Winn 

Henry  J.  Albers 

Charlie  C.  Moore 

David  N'i.xon 

Corporals 

Guy  Bearden 

John  Pazen 

Jack  Gnody 

Clarence  A.  Beatty 

Ludolph  Radick 

135 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


SUPPLY  COMPANY,  86th  INFANTRY 


Regimental  Supply  Sergeants 
Hugh  Barker 
Gordon  Brewer 
Landrum  B.  Harrill 

1st  Sergeant 
Kenneth  E.  LaSaliniere 

Stable  Sergeant 
Raney  Lykins 

Wagon  Master  Sergeant 
Claude  R.  Grammer 

Supply  Sergeants 
George  Burgart 
Henry  E.  Rohde 

Sergeant 
Thomas  L.  McClanahan 

Company  Supply  Sergeant 
Mario  G.  Tonini 


Corporals 
Vivian  L.  Connor 
Robert  L.  Cunningham 
Earl  R.  O'Donnell 
Jesse  B.  McCumber 

Corporal  (Ord.) 
William  M.  Paris 

Mechanics 
Wilbur  R.  Roberts 
Otto  Ernst 
Roy  A.  Hickcox 

Cooks 
Mathew  J.  Casper 
John  J.  Rossetto 
James  WilUams 

Horseshoers 
Ales  J.  Kautto 
Lewis  Miller 


Charles  E.  Robinson 

Wagoners 

Sam  L.  Baker 
John  D.  Beach 
Lawrence  Boles 
Willie  N.  Cargill 
George  R.  Chalmers 
Charles  E.  Fobare 
George  Harp 
Leiand  A.  Hibschman 
John  I.  Jackson 
Cecil  W.  Jones 
Henry  Kraai 
Alva  E.  Lowrj' 
Arthur  P.  Mashbum 
John  R.  McCollum 
Thos.  E.  O'Shaughnessy 
Harry  E.  Pierson 
Luther  L.  Pitts 


Vandiver  C.  Porter 
William  M.  Thomas 
James  G.  Thornton 
Eddie  Wilson 

Saddler 
Otto  Pruesky 

Privates — First  Class 
Clyde  C.  Bender 
Stanley  Berzinski 
Thomas  Gaynor 
Roy  T.  Gower 
Emil  H.  Langer 
.\l\-in  H.  Peters 
Dave  Goosby 

Privates 
James  P.  Ainsworth 

Continued  on  page  171 


136 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


COMPANY  "A,"  86th  INFANTRY 

Captain  George  Eichelmann 

1st  Lieut.  Walter  S.  Black  1st  Lieut.  Mitchell  Jenkins  2nd  Lieut.  Ernest  E.  Applegate 

1st  Sergeant  William  F.  Cunningham  Supply  Sergeant  Fred  Hackendorf 


Sergeants 

John  Boluch 
David  A.  Hil. 
Albe'-t  Kizlei 
Theodore  A.  Olson 
Harry  M.  Pownall 

Corporals 

Edmund  R.  Brown 
Amalio  Perotto 
Lenton  L.  Potts 
Jame.«  E.  Davis 
Thomas  W.  Jones 
John  O.  Lundry 
Edward  D.  Wright 
George  F.  Dye 
John  E  Mielke 
Emanujl  E.  Clark 
Roy  O.  Mees 
Fred  J.  Middie 
Fred  S.  I.ytle 
Thomas  W.  Thompson 


Mechanics 
Earl  Swah 
Louis  Linberg 

Bugler 

William  S.  Robhins 

Privates — First  Class 

Minat  V.  Burnett 
John  Hacay 
Edward  Kozica 
Louis  T.  Ryan 
Joseph  Ronkey 
Walter  Sebaugh 

Privates 

John  S.  Ammons 
Charles  C.  Bogel 
Arthur  R.  Boland 
Joe  Baratta 
Charlie  Bass 
Robert  Q.  Baugh 
Louis  Bosse 


Charles  Brown 
Ronie  L.  Buchanan 
Alver  M.  Chadwick 
Henry  A.  Cooper 
Audie  W.  Connell 
Claud  G.  Collier 
William  B.  Davis 
Houston  Desmond 
Robert  G.  DeBorde 
Bethel  Deskin 
John  R.  Devaney 
Nathan  Dow 
Milton  H.  Epstein 
Ysabel  Esquibcl 
Vick  Fagnani 
Clyde  M  Fenton 
Thomas  F.  Franklin 
Erwin  H.  Gold 
Herman  C.  Goldberg 
Herman  J  Gombert 
Heber  Golden 
Otto  C.  Grebe 
Christobal  Gutierrez 
Felis  Gutierrez 


Ellis  Hargrove 
Lloyd  E.  Harper 
Willie  Hoefelmeyer 
John  M.  Hood 
Robert  A.  Holden 
William  Holden 
Eddie  H.  Hopman 
Aloys  J.  Hellman 
Lawrence  V.  Kallus 
Edwin  J.  Kieffer 
Harry  A.  Kunz 
Tom  Lawson 
Vernan  A.  Lester 
Arthur  Lofland 
Joshua  Lo,.5an 
Christobal  Longoria 
Nathaniel  McDaniel 
Arthur  B.  Manning 
Steve  Mantey 
Horace  J.  Marler 
Robert  M.  Mason 
Wellington  F.  Martin 
Charlie  Meleton 
Vincent  Mazzoni 


Robert  J.  Means 
Arthur  H.  Meyer 
Logan  Nelson 
Jasper  Nickelbur 
Harry  M.  O'Donnell 
Howard  J.  Pendieton 
WiUie  G.  Pennington 
John  C.  Pitts 
Bruce  W.  Price 
Olin  W.  Richards 
Stephen  W.  Richard 
Fritz  Richter 
Charlie  Rosenbaum 
Jce  P.  Schindler 
Louis  Slay 
Philip  E.  Stevens 
Thomas  E.  Tindall 
Frank  Travaglini 
Oscar  J.  Wartenbach 
Earnest  Wengenroth 
Edda  Well  man 
Kurt  Wilde 
William  F.  Williams 
James  M.  Young 


fl37] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


Captain  Ludie  R 

.  Barker 

Captain  Cecil  R. 

Boman 

1st  Lieut.  Jeron  ( 

2.  Stoddard 

Sergeants 

Mechanics 

Charles  R.  Farrell 

William  J.  Stieg 

Clyde  A.  Hawkins 

George  T.  Linegar 

J.  H.  English 
Earl  D.  Warren 

Privates — First  Class 

Joseph  L.  Baane 

Corporals 

William  Fredericksen 

Dwight  Horney 

Christie  H.  Hough 

John  M.  Michaud 

Everett  Ely 

Paul  E.  Youberg 

John  Chanka 

Fred  W.  Snow- 

Privates 

Warren  D.  Hanscom 

Alford  C.  Beard 

Nickolas  Despoto 

Dean  Bearden 

James  R.  Boyd 

Horace  G.  Bennett 

William  J.  Hastings 

Frank  J.  Bentley 

Walter  J.  Tracy 

Andrew  T.  Berry 

Edward  W.  H.  Abraham 

Edward  H.  Bradford 

George  H.  W.  Britton 

Cook 

Claude  Brockman 

Edgar  C.  Brown 

Bruce  L.  Hav 

Charles  A.  Bulin 

COxMPANY  -'B,"  86th  INFANTRY 

1st  Lieut.  Earl  W.  Bratton 
2nd  Lieut.  Michael  Connelly 
1st  Sergeant  Harrison  H.  Pool 


Mess  Sergeant  Peter  Rekosky 
Supply  Sergeant  Cecil  C.  King 


Robert  D.  Burns 
Willie  Burrough 
James  B.  Bush 
Joseph  C.  Caddell 
James  D.  Camp 
Xicasio  Castillo 
Henrv  S.  Chambers 
Erdie"  H.  Clark 
Richard  A.  Crum 
George  R.  Davis 
Joe  Davis 
Lee  W.  Denman 
Gu>-  W.  Dillehay 
John  Evenson 
Jess  Halbert 
Thomas  J.  Harris 
Albert  J.  Hector 
Wiley  H.  Hendricks 
Tommie  L.  Herrington 
Clarence  E.  Higgs 
Roy  E.  Hinton 
Minor  M.  Hittson 
Willie  F.  Hons 


Ben  Hubr 
Edwin  Immel 
Frank  Jarrett 
Earl  E.  Kelly 
Daniel  S.  Lansdon 
Leonard  Lewis 
Claude  E.  Lovorn 
Russell  R.  Mahavier 
Henry  S.  McWhorter 
Paul  H.  Meissner 
Albert  M.  Melin 
Marvin  P.  Miller 
John  E.  Minter 
Ransy  O.  Minton 
Joseph  J.  Mitchell 
.Arnie  E.  Mullins 
Gerhardt  Nelson 
George  F.  Norris 
Lester  R.  Norris 
Ravmond  S.  Norris 
Albert  O'Hara 
William  B.  O'Harrow 
Henry  P.  Phipps 


Joseph  G.  Putman 
Meyer  Rabinovitz 
Jessie  Rawls 
Carl  E.  Richards 
Charlie  Rowell 
Benjamin  G.  Ruiz 
Elzie  Saunders 
Clarence  R.  Schetterley 
Henry  J.  Schirmer 
Henry  Schubert,  Jr. 
Benjamin  F.  Selvage 
Turner  E.  Shaver 
William  A.  Smith 
James  W.  Spann 
Dale  Standifer 
Eugene  W.  Stark,  Jr. 
William  B.  Stockton 
F.arl  H.  Swan 
James  E.  Tarpley 
Jim  Tems 

Marshall  M.  S.  Toler 
Willie  E.  Walker 
John  B.  Young 


138 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


COMPANY  "C,"  86th  INFANTRY 
Captain  Edwin  N.  Stanley  Captain  C.  E.  Matt  Dahlgreen 

1st  Lieut.  Fdward  T.  Bagaley  1st  Lieut.  Beehe  W.  Yeager  2nd  Lieut.  Joe  McDonald 

1st  Sergeant  Barthnlomcw  S.  Cusic  Supply  Sergeant  Charles  E.  Ellis 


Sergeants 
Guy  O.  Lockwood 
Patrick  F.  Condon 
Wade  H.  Furrow 
Harold  J.  Boulton 
Gradv  S.  Cheek 
Harold  C.  Reese 

Corporals 
Martin  L.  Tanner 
Paul  G.  Raasch 
Humbert  O.  Nellie 
Orval  F.  Litherland 
Delmire  Hart 
Leo  Kolodzaike 

Cooks 
John  B.  Gore 
George  T.  George 


George  Jaeckel 
James  R.  Price 

Bugler 
Edwin  R  Freehner 

Mechanics 
Louis  E  Hogan 
Anslem  Isakson 

Privates — First  Cla's 
Benjamin  L.  Hariis 
William  C.  R.  Heckner 
Garland  H.  Henderson 
Samuel  L.  Howard 
John  Jandecka 
John  Klikunas 
Lester  H.  Lamore 
Mike  Lapuch 


Lyman  P.  Mittlesteadt 
Tohn  Noyes 
Grover  C.  Porter 

Privates 
Benjamin  F  Adams 
Feline  A   Aragon 
Felibtrto  Armiyo 
WiMiam  H.  Benedix 
Fred  G.  Beshell 
Sylvester  P.  Bock 
Raymond  C.  Boysen 
George  Bradley 
C.  H.  Bronn 
Rufus  B.  Brown 
Graden  Bryant 
Edgar  Burns 
Robert  D.  Burroughs 
Samuel  .\.  Bu.sh 


Carroll  E.  Butler 
Jesse  S.  Butler 
Val  J.  Caruth 
Lem  F^akin 
Edwin  R.  EUebraught 
Cliarlie  Engelage 
Louis  H.  Fisher 
Wesley  J.  Geistweidt 
George  E.  Gcsche 
Frank  W.  Gray 
Rock  E.  Greapleaf 
George  Haler 
James  M.  Hawkins 
Charlie  Henske.  Jr. 
Fritz  A.  Jan'sen 
Guy  H.  Jenkins 
George  A.  Jensen 
Ven  M.  Jones 
Elbert  W.  Jordan 


Mike  L.  Kubiak 
Robert  L.  Lingo 
Sillano  Lopez 
.\dt)lph  H.  Maeker 
Sam  J.  Martin 
Edgar  Moses 
Edward  Murphy 
Louis  Muto 
Eli  W.  McDonald 
Homer  McMichacl 
Joe  C.  Neilon 
Carl  V.  Nordqulst 
Jose  M.  Olivarez 
Fred  C.  Paris 
David  A.  Perdue 
Henry  W.  Petering 
Thomas  J.  L.  Ray 
Morgan  V.  Reed 
Fred  B.  Sartain 


Fredwick  W.  Schramm 
Willie  E.  Schulenberg 
Elbert  T.  Shotwell 
John  W.  Sims 
Willie  C.  Smith 
Louis  R.  Storey 
Lewis  Stuckey 
Frank  Thompson 
Pum  Roy  Thompson 
James  E.  Thornhill 
Erwin  W.  Tidwell 
Thomas  G.  Veitch 
Frank  H.  Waherenberg 
Benjamin  T.  Walker 
Charles  F.  Warling 
Wallace  E  Warren 
Clyde  C.  Wilson 


139 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


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[140] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


|i 


COMPANY  "E,'"  86th  INF. WIRY 

Captain  Percy  G.  Caldwell 

1st  Lieut.  Francis  M.  Charev  1st  Lieut.  Leonard  A.  Wilson  2d  Lieut.  Edward  J.  PoUik 

1st  Sergeant  Harold  S.  Twiss  Supply  Sergeant  Win   C.  Gumme 


Sergeants 
Raymond  A.  Stephens 
George  D.  Corey 
Arthur  Lauer 
Leonard  B.  Banks 
Alfred  H.  Linder 
Walter  C.  Heins 

Corporals 
Ray  Hamilton 
Willie  D.  Lee 
Augustine  Mach 
John  H.  Warner,  Jr. 
Robert  C.  Nowy 
Harry  Veach 
Edwin  W.  Grimes 

Mechanics 
Athos  Call 
Louis  Herb 


Buglers — First  Class 

Jos  Biondi 
George  Cross 

Privates — First  Class 
Henry  Allegretti 
Walter  Sitarz 
Earnest  Querl 
C'arence  Bailey 
Frederick  Bickel 
Lloyd  F.  Rogers 
Paul  Garlisch 
Coin  T.  Peago 
Ernest  J.  Savant 
Arthur  Thigpin 
Casper  Reiff 
Joseph  Wallace 


Caivin  R.  Bradburry 
Jesus  Maldonado 
Chas.  H.  TomUnson 
Wm.  M.  Antilley 
John  Dulock 
Wm.  D  Harvison 
Bunyon  Cooper 

Privates 
Dudley  Alton 
Wm.  H.  Armstrong 
Thomas  O  Baker 
Henry  M.  Bprrett 
Earl  Blaif 

Emmitt  E.  Bowerman 
Emil  Braun 
Mayron  M.  Cook 
Juan  B   Garcia 


Car!  Gordon 
Robert  P.  Grigg= 
Edward  M.  Heidom 
Thomas  B.  Hall 
Adolph  G.  Hanusch 
Henry  C.  Jones 
Clarence  Kinzer 
John  A.  Kuehl 
Daniel  Lantrip 
Arthur  Lenz 
Rutillic  Leyva 
Guy  H.  Morrison 
Vince  Navara 
Elbert  Morris 
Arthur  Pritchett 
Thurman  Petty 
Ed.  E.  Robbin? 


Joe  Schulak 
Gustave  A.  Srhulze 
O'lie  A.  Sides 
Tom  T.  Stark 
Edward  M.  Simmons 
Dee  M.  Sanders 
George  C.  Strong 
Oscar  Ulrich 
Harmon  T.  Wingfield 
Aldredge  T.  Ward 
John  Walla 
George  T.  Wright 
Cleaber  S.  Warren 
Joseph  J  Zelinski 


i:^A  .. 


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141 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


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CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


COMPANY   "G,"   86th   INFANTRY 


1st  Lieut.  Winfrey  G.  Nathan 


Captain  John  H.  White 
2nd  Lieut,  .\rthur  R.  Spann         1st  Sergeant  Joe  A.  Williams 


Supply  Sergeant  Tom  J.  Nowicki 


Sergeants 
Charles  F.  McManamin 
Reymond  E.  Leonard 
Erwin  G.  Fluty 
Joseph  C.  White 
Edward  Merganthaler 
Andrew  C.  Wozniak 
Otto  Ohlrich 
Marvin  Wright 

Corporals 

Errol  P.  Johnson 
Raymond  A.  Wheeler 
Victor  Niemi 
Clarence  R.  McCoy 
Carl  A.  Fowler 
Wincenty  Zielinski 
William  C.  Kleine 
Harold  C.  Rippy 
Ignatz  J.  Sorgmann 
George  J.  Novak 

Mechanics 

Martin  O.  Wagenbach 
Charles  H.  Waller 

Buglers 

Virgil  J.  Clanton 
Louis  Grossman 


Privates — First  Class 
Elmer  W.  Boettcher 
Jan  Dzieciol 
John  Evans 
Oscar  George 
Thomas  Gordon 
Josef  Gorka 
Roy  R.  Grant 
George  W.  Hemmingway 
John  H.  HiU 
Troy  M.  Hodges 
Robbie  C.  Knight 
John  Majetic 
Floyd  Payne 
Mark  Milasinovich 
Paul  Selaya 
Frank  Waraszcynski 
Harrison  W.  Welty 

Privates 
Marcus    M.  Abma 
Kersey  D.  Alexander 
Thee  L.  Arwood 
Rufus  W.  Ballenger 
John  W.  Bird 
Chelby  C.  Brown 
Jesse  C.  Brownwell 
Willie  E.  Burleson 
.\lbert  L.  Busby 
James  L.  Cade 


Clarence  P.  Campbell 
John  H.  Canary 
David  C.  Carter 
Castullo  Castellano 
Willie  S.  Chapman 
JIanuel  Cherry 
Rutledge  B.  Childress 
Pinkney  A.  Conn 
John  C.  Cook 
Silas  Cooper 
Dolar  H.  Coulson 
Jack  G.  Cude 
Charlie  E.  Culver 
Claud  B.  Cunningham 
James  A.  Davidson 
Louis  Dressier 
Lewis  H.  Drum 
Hugh  L.  Dighton 
Charles  F.  Dissler 
William  H.  EUett 
Harry  J.  Engelke 
Archie  P.  Fitzgerald 
Tony  Floca 
William  R.  Ford 
John  H.  Franklin 
Corbit  Gravitt 
Henry  E.  Grove 
Charles  G.  Grumbles 
Thomas  O.  Hamilton 
William  J.  Hathcoat 


R.  D.  Hatten 
Ernest  Hayes 
Jesse  P.  Hileman 
William  C.  Holden 
Conrad  E.  Johnson 
Jesse  L.  Johnson 
Bronislaw  Kaczinski 
Karel  Kaluza 
Emsley  Kinnon 
William  C.  Kocian 
John  L.  Leeper 
Lawrence  M.  Maupin 
William  E.  Marberry 
Farris  E.  Moore 
James  R.  Murrell 
Everett  L.  Parker 
John  H.  Pinson 
James  W.  Pratt 
Herman  Park 
Floyd  Ramos 
John  P.  Riley 
Joseph  L.  Russell 
Icem  Ryals 
Herman  J.  Scherer 
Chappel  C.  Sewell 
Everett  B.  Shaw 
Walter  E.  Shoemaker 
James  F.  Shields 
William  B.  Short 


Vertice  F.  Smith 
Arthur  G.  Snelgrove 
John  T.  Still 
Lewis  W.  Stegmiller 
James  B.  Stovall 
Danis  P.  Stowe 
Alvin  E.  Swenson 
Edgar  B.  Taylor 
Fred  O.  Thames 
Carles  Thomas 
James  P.  Thomas 
Jim  I.  Thomas 
Wesley  L.  Thompson 
Gustav  A.  Toepfer 
Roy  L.  Tucker 
Isaac  R.  Turner 
Joe  Ullman 
Reyes  Vera  Cruz 
Charlie  D.  Walls 
Carrus  S.  Ward 
John  R.  Wheeler 
Howell  M.  White 
Clifton  Whitton 
Willie  L.  Wilson 
Wesley  B.  Withrow 
Thomas  M.  Wolverton 
Jack  Wood 
Alvin  A.  Yeager 
Charlie  J.  Zost 


*^''Jf: 


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143 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


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144 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


COMPANY  "I,"  86th  INFANTRY 


Captain  Herbert  N.  Eadon 

2nd  Lieut.  Leonard  B.  Berkbigler 


1st  Lieut.  John  C.  Heidenreich 
1st  Sergeant  Ebb  Wood 


1st  Lieut.  Glenn  P.  Gardner 
Supply  Sergeant  Richard  C.  Ormsby 


Sergeants 

William  O.  Kimsey 
William  Hoflman 
WendeU  P.  Kline 
Jay  Hamilton 
Franklin  P.  Childers 
Joe  Vitale 

Corporals 

Edward  Moran 
Ernest  H.  Beinke 
Ernest  Kirklin 
John  Cihak 

Cooks 
August  Raes 
Harrison  H.  Moulton 

Mechanics 
Fra.nk  Dixon 
Stephen  B  Whitley 


Privates — First  Class 
Joseph  Costello 
Claience  F.  Hyatt 
Ernest  W.  Kimble 
James  W.  Moore 
Joe  H.  Will'ams 

Privates 
Charlie  Benoskia 
Middy  P.  Bingham 
Odell  J.  Brown 
William  F.  Bryan 
Harry  W  Buck 
Martin  K.  Cassel 
Grover  H.  Clay 
Grady  H.  Crank 
William  P.  Collins 
Orris  H  CundiEf 
Benjamin  Cummings 
Sidney  L.  Curtis 
Elmer  R.  Dame 


Charlie  N.  Derrick 
Floyd  L.  Dotson 
Harm  C.  Donehoo 
Cecil  C.  Easley 
William  H  Eastcrling 
Clyde  H.  Ellison 
Wendell  F.  Ellsworth 
Amado  Everett 
Willie  A.  Franklin 
Alexander  Glendenning 
Grady  L,  Grandstaff 
James  S.  Harvey 
John  R.  Harvey 
Thomas  A.  Hendrix 
Adolphus  Hurbough 
John  H.  Jack.«on 
Jesse  B.  Kittron 
Stephen  Kleehammer 
John  Krianiak 
Marion  L^ftin 
James  Low 


Benjamin  Loustaunau 
CliEEord  O.  Marler 
George  Miles 
Floyd  J.  Moseley 
Volney  C.  Norris 
William  B.  Parrish 
William  I.  Parks 
Harm  F.  Phillips 
Wiley  J.  Pike 
Clodioue  A.  Powell 
Louis  P.  Read 
Cloy  Rrid 
Albert  Richardson 
Clarence  T.  Robinett 
Will  Rodgers 
Merritt  B.  Seelye 
Btrt  Shambles 
John  H.  Spivey 
Paul  Villerreal 
Claud  L  Ward       . 
Travis  B.  Wilkins 


145] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


1  ^^'    -^'^5."^ 

A.' 

<■    1                                               TV?          ^ 

COMPANY  "K,"  86th  INFANTRY 

Captain  Thomas  E.  Lipscomb 

1st  Lieut.  Thomas  K.  Creson  1st  Lieut.  Walter  \\.  Calkins  2nd  Lieut,  .\lbert  H.  Stelzner 

1st  Sergeant  .\nton  Jonke  Supply  Sergeant  Grover  C.  Moss 


Sergeants 

Walter  Fleszar 
James  D.  Harry 
John  E.  McCreary 
OUie  Moore 


Corporals 

Edd  N.  Rednour 
Ralph  Tank 
Lloyd  H.  Wormley 
Thomas  F.  Loyd 
Merv'en  Roberson 
Neil  Farren 
Alva  O.  Hall 
Joseph  P.  Holloman 
Wilhelm  Jensen 
George  C.  Kline 
Napoleon  T.  Pa\-ment 
Blake  B.  Riley  ' 
Ross  R.  Truesdale 


Mechanic 

Pater  Butenas 

Bugler 

Andrew  Chachoevech 

Privates — ^First  Class 

Stanley  Bemot 
Patrick  J.  Delaney 
Francis  A.  Hughes 
Fabian  S.  Kelly 
Otto  Muzzarelli 
Willard  H.  Purfeerst 
Richard  D.  Roberts 
Edward  Schmidt 

Privates 
Horace  Baker 
Ernest  Ballow 
Oscar  J.  Beard 
John  C.  Bennefield 
Frederick  H.  Birck 


Jim  G.  Blo.xom 
Jerry  T.  Bowlin 
Bradford  B.  Brinson 
Truman  Brooks 
Hollie  D.  Bush 
Leo  Cherry 
Robert  G.  Clark 
Boss  Cockerell 
John  M.  Cole 
Luther  C.  Crump 
Ernest  N.  Cummings 
Albert  E.  Davis 
Henry  S.  DeBord 
Earl  Dbcon 
Arch  B.  Ellis 
Jesse  L.  Eubanks 
James  P.  Faircloth 
Frank  J.  Filip 
William  W.  Freeman 
William  Gear}- 
.•\ndrew  J.  Hansen 
Reuben  H.  Harvil 
Frank  J.  Herbst 


Albert  Hohensee 
Frank  Honomichl 
Charles  L.  Hunter 
Robert  R.  Inderman 
Thomas  M.  Johnson 
Daniel  Kelley 
Otto  P.  Koehler 
Herman  C.  Kram 
Robert  W.  Laas 
Leroy  Lane 
Glenn  McClurg 
Ernest  Ritter 
Delmond  D.  Seamans 
Glen  C.  Smith 
Essibious  J.  Stone 
V'ernie  Taylor 
.\ndrew  J.  Toney 
Frank  Trader 
Asa  E.  Walker 
Sam  Watson 
Hariie  A.  Watts 
John  T.  Weatherford 
.\bner  O.  Whiddon 


[146] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


COMPANY  "L,"  86th  INFANTRY 


Sergeants 
Ritson  Browning 
Christopher  Campbell 
Ova  Farien 
Fred  Miller 
Thomas  K.  Jones 
James  D.  Whitaker 

Corporals 
Luther  L.  Coughlan 
Daniel  F.  Draper 
Henry  French 
Stephen  Gilbert 
Joseph  W.  Gordon 
Terrence  McEntee 
Jack  S.  Mitchell 
Alamander  L,  Whitaker 
Bemhard  A.  Wnukowski 


Captain  Edward  A.  Collins 
1st  Lieut.  Lovic  W.  Livingston  1st  Lieut.  Leonard  G.  Geiselman 

1st  Lieut.  Glenn  E.  Van  Meter  1st  Lieut.  Harold  E.  Gilliland 

1st  Sergeant  Charles  P.  Crowley 


Buglers 
Harry  C.  Dillard 
David  Segal 

Mechanics 
.\rthur  W.  Bradley 
Louis  Yaslowitz 

Privates — First  Class 
George  W.  Forrest 
Nathaniel  F.  Hewitt 
Frank  H.  Lewis 
Urban  L.  Schell 
Floyd  R.  Womack 

Privates 
William  I.  Allen 
Stanley  Babiaz 
TranquiHno  Barela 


Luther  Batev 
John  E.  Bilb'rey 
Thomas  J.  Callihan 
George  D.  Campbell 
Conrad  M.  Carlson 
Clay  B.  Chitwood 
Cyrus  W.  Cothran 
Loyd  B.  Cowart 
George  A.  Cuchener 
James  J.  Deacon 
James  E.  Dicken 
Ray  Edwards 
Joseph  Ferraro 
William  H.  Flanagan 
Robert  L.  Foster 
Ralph  R.  Fullbright 
Seberiano  Garcia 
Joe  L.  Garner 
.\udie  H.  Graham 


Cater  Hales 
Maximiano  Jaramillo 
Henry  E.  Lockett 
Willie  C.  Lude 
Huey  S.  McBee 
Roy  McBride 
Louis  McKay 
Barni  Macari 
Ladislav  J.  Marik 
Nicholas  R.  Mattingly 
Siberesler  Medino 
William  R.  Merryman 
Roy  B.  Miller 
Stanley  Obolewicz 
Hebcr  B.  Odom 
John  V.  Orsak 
Lee  W.  Parker 
.■Mien  J.  Peikert 
Willie  Petru 


Ernest  W.  Plant 
John  J.  Richie 
William  .\.  Rodgers 
.Marvin  H.  Rushing 
James  R.  .Safar 
John  .\.  Skelton 
.\le.\-.  Skoller 
Slepp  Smothers 
Ilillard  M.  Soward 
Pratt  Stevens 
James  A.  Swanner 
John  Sykora 
\'cndalin  Telka 
Louis  Timme 
Warren  B.  Tuttle 
Thomas  I.  Vannoy 
Richard  R.  Ward 
tJeorge  W.  Watson 
Israel  Wildstcin 


147 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


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148 


CAMP    TRAVIS    AND    THE    WORLD    WAR 


MEDICAL  DETACHMENT,  86th  INFANTRY 


1st  Lieut.  James  T.  King,  M.  C. 


Captain  Harry  G.  Martin,  M.  C,  Commanding 

1st  Lieut.  Richard  P.  Dorris,  M.C.  First  Class  Sergeant  Edward  W.  Thompson 

Sergeants 


Jesse  E.  Cumbee 
Henry  H.  Hodgen 


Garrard  D.  Smith 
Judson  T.  Wilkes 


Roy  I.  Benson 
Charles  A.  Braman 


Privates — First  Class 
William  P.  Butler  Elmer  0.  Jacobson 

Charley  W.  Dodson  Waldo  E.  Karcher 


William  Matte 
George  E.  Markart 


Marvin  Bickle 
Lee  P.  Burnett 
Reginald  E.  Cox 
Charles  E.  Dower 
Elbert  C.  Ferguson 
William  C.  Fuller 
George  Gamble 


Privates 
Dow  Hudson 
Herbert  G.  Hughes 
Irl  E.  Larimore 
John  C.  Kennedy 
William  T.  Hayes 
Bryan  Lloyd 
Charlie  C.  McQuiston 
William  M.  Moos 


Celley  T.  Nutt 
Walter  F.  Peters 
Bircet  J.  Sublett 
James  E.  Williams 
Adelbert  L.  Wilson 
Larkin  A.  Jones 
James  T.  Turner 


[149] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


HEADQUARTERS  COMPANY,  35th  INFANTRY 
Ccmtinued  from  page  116 


Privates — Conlinued 
\Vm.  J.  Barker 
Harn.-  C.  Barr 
Wm.' Batters 
Leonard  Beach 
Ralph  B.  Bement 
Arthur  R.  Bennett 
Stephen  Berardi 
Russell  Brown 
James  Burke 
Ralph  J.  Burns 
Carl  Burster 
Wm.  B.  Byrd 
Arlie  H.  Camahan 
Edward  B.  Caron 
Frank  J.  Chapek,  Jr. 
Charles  W.  Darrow 
Claude  M.  Davis 
Henrv  J.  Deutsch 
William  H.  Dike 
Edward  Doyle 
Da\-id  M.  Drur\- 
Merton  P.  Dunlap 
Louis  G.  Exter 
Clyde  O.  Fisher 
Hugh  Flanagan 
Delbert  Flores 
Cecil  Freeman 
Carl  A.  Graf 
Albert  Graves 
Piatt  H.  Hammond 
Mitchell  W.  Hauth 
Cyril  Hawn 


Daniel  Hoare 
Babe  Homer 
Harry  M.  Howell 
Woodson  D.  Huffman 
I.*slie  M.  Hulse 
Edw.  W.  Hotchkiss 
John  J.  Ingling 
Fred  Jeffers 
Arthur  F.  Johnson 
Floyd  C.  Johnson 
Arundle  F.  Jones 
Whitney  Judkins 
John  J.  Joyce 
Stanislaw  Kendziora 
Edwin  Kirwin 
Charlie  K.  Klausen 
Elza  Knowles 
Elbert  M.  Lock  wood 
John  D.  Lund 
Arnold  L.  Melton 
Wm.  A.  McCormick 
Frank  A.  Magers 
Edgar  M.  Mastad 
John  W.  Moe 
Elmer  S.  Morrow 
Harry  C.  Moss 
Jacob  J.  Mueller 
James  W.  Mullin 
Wm.  L.  Myers 
Edmund  L.  Nickol 
Charles  H.  Niederhut 
Sam  C.  Xoot 
Gavlord  H.  Paine 


Harold  S.  Partridge 
Harry  J.  Pekerek 
Lawrence  Perdeau 
Lars  P.  Peterson 
Edward  J.  Pingel 
Francis  D.  Powell 
Wm.  F.  Powell 
Thomas  C.  Purcell 
Verdie  Raper 
John  E.  Reid 
Everett  Richmond 
Ernest  J.  Robinson 
Roy  V.  Robinson 
Ray  S.  Rome 
Wilbert  J.  Runge 
Harr>'  W.  Scarbrough 
John  C.  Schnarr 
Robert  K.  Schwarz 
Fred  W.  Seefeldt 
Thunnan  N.  Shafer 
Jesse  E.  Shyrack 
William  H.  Smith 
Kem  E.  Snow 
Jesse  W.  Souther 
Albert  SteiimiiUer 
Edward  J.  Strickland 
Carl  J.  Swanson 
James  H.  Turner 
Valentine  J.  Vance 
Edw.  W.  VanGundy 
Julius  Voelker 
Walter  Vogt 
Linden  Walton 


Ray  E.  Warren 
Samuel  P.  Watson 
Elmer  L.  White 
Clarence  .\.  Wilson 
Edward  G.  Wolf 
Marvin  B.  Wood 
Paul  F.  W>Tine 

Headquarters  Company 

Band 
Assistant  Band  Leader 
Jeremiah  Christiano 

Sergeant  Bugler 
John  Devlin 

Band  Sergeants 
Earl  H.  Summer\-ille 
Fred  James 
Walter  S.  Wade 
Herbert  W.  Dealing 

Band  Corporals 
Otis  Cutlip 
Florian  A.  Holek 

Musicians — First  Class 
Orville  C.  Lind 
Frank  J.  Bennett 
Lloyd  J.  Bowen 
Thomas  J.  Murphy 
Alex.  Zukowski 


Musicians — Second  Class 
Harry  J.  Bennett 
William  Sweegon 
Ray  O.  Whorral 
George  Jones 
Anton  Piazza 
Richard  Burns 
Samuel  Ritz 

Musicians — ^Third  Class 
Frank  Abbott 
Mike  Bachkis 
John  Cebula 
Anton  Cupik 
Joe  Dimeo 
Adhemard  Faucer 
Alex.  Glombiki 
Samuel  Hancock 
Gustave  Johnson 
Paul  Liangminas 
Joseph  Mattal 
Clarke  A.  Purcell 
Karl  R.  Young 
George  Yurisich 
Frank  Mikelasek 
Wm.  Weisenbach 
Francis  Hilliard 


SUPPLY   COMPANY,  35th  INFANTRY 

Conlinned  from  page  US 


Wagoners — Conlinued 
John  Folkerts 
BUI  F.  Foster 
Philip  Gallo 
Joe  Glover 
Andrew  D.  Goodson 
James  W.  Gossett 
William  Green 
George  O.  Gregorj- 
James  H.  Hamilton 
George  Hanson 
Hie  P.  Harrison 
Maynard  W.  Healy 
Patrick  F.  Heffemann 
Robert  Helton 
Bill  Jones 
Charles  C.  Keith 
Thomas  Kelly 
Mathias  H.  Klein 
Henry  Krager 
Clyde  Kygar 
Earl  Lattin 


Raymond  Little 
WiU.  H.  Lyons 
Taylor  F.  Martin 
Evart  McFaddan 
James  McVey 
William  Metcalf 
Paris  Meyers 
Thomas  Miskell 
Charley  Newberry 
Richard  C.  Nunlley 
Thomas  O'Neil 
Harold  Peterson 
Elmer  C.  Peterson 
Robert  O.  Phillips 
William  Poel 
Charles  V.  Riggsbee 
Alva  R.  Roberts 
Rusaw  Saylor 
Fred  Schaefer 
Elmer  E.  Schultz 
Freeman  L.  Sherwood 
George  F.  Street 


Thomas  J.  Sutley 
Hugh  Taylor 
Sherman  E.  Thompson 
Joseph  Tipotsch 
Garvin  Vaughn 
William  F.  Waslous 
Ernest  C.  Wheeler 
Lorin  E.  Wilkins 
Lloyd  O.  Williams 
James  W.  Winn 
Floyd  W.  Young 

Privates — First  Class 

John  N.  Adler 
George  W.  Allen 
Robert  E.  Connell 
Abraham  Edelson 
Harold  C.  Fletcher 
Hany  V.  Fletcher 
Herbert  A.  Kepple 
Archie  A.  Metcalf 


Emmet  F.  O'Connell 
Henry  Woodward 

Privates 
Martin  A.  Adams 
Frank  Carter 
Claude  C.  Embree 
John  H.  Fox 
Pearl  A.  Gilmore 
Evett  L.  Good 
Henry  Martin 
Nicholas  J.  Miller 
Charles  Partner 
Orion  L.  Perry 
William  V.  Rafferty 
Earl  A.  Robinson 
Ivar  W.  Shaw 
R.  B.  Sturdavant 
Charles  Thomas 
George  Thompson 
Edward  Williams 
Foster  Wilson 


Joseph  Wirth 
Joseph  Zuber 

Ordnance  Detachment 
35th  Infantry 

Detachment  Commander 
Captain  R.  N.  Hamilton 

Ordnance  Sergeant 
John  W.  Robinson 

Corporal  of  Ordnance 
Henry  C.  Ahlers 

Privates — First  Class 
William  G.  Jackson 
Cornelius  P.  McHugh 

Privates 
Rellie  Sitz 
Marshall  Smith 
Clarence  McFarland 


August  Laucius 
Felix  Lawicki 
Ora  Little 
Edward  C.  Lutes 
Bartolo  Maez 
Jesse  Mayfield 


COMPANY  "B,"  35th  INFANTRY 
Continued  from  page  120 


Juan  F.  Mestas 
Lawrence  F.  Neeser 
Joseph  Piasecki 
Vincenzo  Picinini 
Warren  Plymate 
Jose  F.  Quintana 


Thomas  E.  Raymond 
Edward  Rupp 
Tony  Santilli 
Hyman  Sherman 
Franciszek  Slowik 
George  Steinhoff 


Guy  C.  Stevenson 
Frank  B.  Swenson 
Lewis  C.  Szewczyk 
Mike  Szynkowski 
Jesse  H.  Taylor 
Mike  Titow 


Constantnos  Vlamakis 
Robert  R.  Ward 
Peter  Wojcik 
Leo  Wolshon 
Frank  P.  Wright 
William  J.  G.  Wuetig 


Privates — Continued 
Arvil  J.  Kellems 
Leon  Knox 
Fred  Kossow 
Wadislaw  Kozlowski 
Julius  J.  Kueck 
Roy  C.  Leonard 
Earl  .■\.  Lonsway 
Felipe  Martinez 


COMPANY  "C,"  35th  INFANTRY 
Continued  from  page  121 


Louis  Martinez 
Herbert  A.  McGrain 
Adelaid  Medina 
Raymond  Mitchell 
William  R.  Morrison 
Ashley  J.  Moye 
Stanley  Mura%vski 
Jim  Natali 
Alfred  Nelsen 


Ted  O'Connor 
Martin  A.  Okon 
Byron  G.  Pierce 
Lester  F.  Riggins 
George  Robuck,  Jr. 
Clyde  W.  Seevers 
William  F.  Silberzahn 
Valenty  Siminski 
Nick  Sloko 


Earl  Snow 
Ellis  L.  Snow 
Harry  Sorenson 
Elias  Trujillo 
William  E.  Tutt 
Fred  C.  Umgelder 
Morris  Valdez 
Jesse  Vantreese 
Victor  C.  Vasquez 


Fermin  Viarrial 
Jose  T.  Vigil 
John  Wahlin 
Elford  F.  Wilson 
Ernest  D.  Youngblood 
Waldo  J.  Young 
Michael  Zemaiduk 
Stanley  P.  Zielinski 
WilUam  C.  tenner 


1150] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


f^' 


nn 


MAJOR  DeROHAN  AND  OFFICERS,  54th  MACHINE  GUN  BATTALION 
First  Row— left  to  right 


2nd  Lieut.  L.  F.  Nelson 
2nd  Lieut.  J.  L.  McKee 
Captain  M.  B.  Holson 
Captain  J.  G.  Deitz 
Major  F.  J.  DeRohan 


Captain  W.  O.  White 
Captain  H.  S.  Williams 
2nd  Lieut.  O.  A.  Jenkins 
1st  Lieut.  B.  C.  Kennon 
2nd  Lieut.  C.  M.  McGregor 


Second  Row — left  to  right 

2nd  Lieut.  P.  E.  Coad  2nd  Lieut.  J.  R.  Rash 

2nd  Lieut.  E.  M.  Cooke  2nd  Lieut.  J.  A.  Toepfer 

2nd  Lieut.  C.  M.  McCune  2nd  Lieut.  C.  H.  Hardison 

1st  Lieut.  P.  R.  .\cton  2nd  Lieut.  C.  B.  Manifold 


151 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


w  ^ 


J". 


*  *.'- 


■i-  •>ia«->? 


HEADQUARTERS,  54th  MACfflNE  GUN  BATTALION 
Major  F.  J.  DeRohan,  Commanding  2nd  Lieut.  Oran  A.  Jenkins,  Adjutant  2nd  Lieut.  Emmet  M.  Cook,  Supply  Officer 


Sergeant  Majors 
James  J.  Eberfeld 
Chris  A.  Jensen 

Personnel  Sergeant 
Earle  E.  Brj-ant 


Stable  Sergeant 
Feaman  A.  Paul 

Corporal 
Maurice  R.  Kutcher 


Privates 
Xorby  .\ycock 
Geo.  E.  Cross 
Claud  K.  Gray 
Walter  A.  May 
John  B.  Mewes 


Frank  K.  Boland 
Francis  M.  Brown 
Walter  R.  Cranford 
John  Dohbel 
John  Gassett 
Axel  W.  Kallberg 
Denzil  L.  Nelson 


Oscar  M.  Ntl  an 
Frank  Paul 
Fred  Price 
George  Schmick 
Herhiert  R.  Snyder 
Fred  Wood 


COMP.\NY  "A,"  54th  SL^CHINE  GUN  BATTALION 


2nd  Lieut.  Morris  M.  Taylor  2nd  Lieut.  Chas.  N.  McCune  2nd  Lieut.  Paul  E.  Coad 

1st  Sergeant  Jerimiah  J.  SuUivan,  Jr.  Stable  Sergeant  Ema  L.  Robinson 


Sergeants 
William  H.  Schwab 
Harr>-  Dill 
Frank  E.  Kates 

Corporals 
Christian  Stief 
Bert  R.  York 
Patrick  J.  O'Malley 
Carl  Rewak 
Everett  E.  Sims 
Henry  E.  .\shum 
.\lbert  Halfpap 
Tom  M.  Sears 


Privates 
Wyley  L.  .\iidrews 
Edgar  R.  Baker 
Walter  J.  Booth 
Charles  Bemasek 
Paul  Braun 
Thomas  W.  Brj'ant 
Joseph  A.  Ce\Tiowa 
Claude  A.  Chrisco 
Howard  H.  Chapman 
William  H.  CUnt 
Walter  H.  Dallmann 
Richard  F.  Daugherty 
Leo  Draftz 
Louis  A.  Endres 
James  C.  Ferris 
Leo  F.  Fisher 


.Albert  J.  Frelke 
Allan  H.  Gallaher 
Hemyn  J.  Gowans 
Clarence  C.  Haislet 
Irvin  L.  Harrison 
Joe  P.  Hardin 
Herbert  Hyatt 
Michial  Herdegen 
John  H.  Jenkins 
Ernest  W.  Jockheck 
Joel  Johnson 
Currie  T.  Johnson 
Dock  Johnson 
John  P.  Jones 
Da\'id  B.  Jordon 
Wilhielm  C.  Kamradt 
William  F.  Kather 


Ozias  B.  Kizer 
Clinton  S.  Laughlin 
Sla>'ton  V.  Lloyd 
Henry  E.  Lotz 
Lonnie  L.  Lowe 
Lawrence  E.  Lutz 
William  A.  Malley 
CharUe  C.  Mason 
Bemhard  Martinson 
Joseph  F.  McCaskill 
William  C.  McCrimmon 
Jay  Miller 
Guy  Neel 

Frank  W.  Neumann 
Maurice  Olson 
WiUiam  C.  O'Neal 
Hermas  Powell 


Ollie  C.  Rankin 
Timothy  J.  Regan 
Thomas  M.  Robinson 
Joseph  E.  Roberts 
Warren  Robertson 
Richard  U.  Rodman 
William  L.  Rogers 
RajTnond  S.  Rose 
Ruius  L.  Slater 
Claude  R.  Spear 
Edward  T.  Sweet 
Harry  W.  Thibedeau 
William  S.  Torson 
John  .\.  Werssell 
Charles  E.  WTiitman 
William  B.  Willis 
Whit  F.  Wvnn 


COMP.\NY  "B,"  54th  MACHINE  GUN  BATT.VLION 


Captain  M.  6.  Halsey 
1st  Lieut.  Paul  R.  Acton 
2nd  Lieut.  John  L.  McKee 
2nd  Lieut.  C.  E.  McGregor 


2nd  Lieut.  C.  H.  Hardison 
1st  Sergeant  Walter  S.  Hartness 
Supply  Sergeant  William  F.  Cole 
Stable  Sergeant  George  .■\.  Stevens 


Sergeants 
Walter  J.  Cochran 
Albert  J..  Held 
Alfred  J.  C.  Reeves 

Corporals 
Russel  G.  Harris 
Homer  D.  Hoyle 
Clay  Huffman 
Edward  .\.  JIaginnis 
Leon  R.  Quinlan 
John  Tomizek 

Bugler 
Milo  K.  Donohoe 

Mechanic 
Richard  L.  Henderson 


Privates — First  Class 
Tom  H.  Amerson 
WiUiam  A.  Craven 
Tony  J.  Gwitt 
Harold  E.  Hess 
Guy  McDanials 
Sigurd  Nelson 
George  A.  Peltier 
CUfford  Radder 
Frank  Smetana 
Morris  Tabashnek 
Henry  F.  Woods 

Privates 
Fred  L.  Adler 
Owen  B.  Armistead 
Stanley  E.  Armstrong 


Edward  J.  Barry 
Harry  Berman 
Grady  Bridges 
Leon  Q.  Champion 
John  O.  Craft 
Rov  M.  Deveraux 
Ross  E.  Elliott 
Carl  F.  Freed 
Leander  O.  Griffith 
Clarence  L.  Haley 
George  C.  Hammac 
Ray  Harrison 
Earl  Head 

Comey  O.  Helgerson 
Ernest  H.  B.  Hinz 
Lawson  C.  Holder 
Earl  L.  Johnson 
ilartin  E.  Jachens 


William  F.  Kanies 
Richard  F.  Kennet 
Ezra  Knight 
John  E.  Landers 
Elroy  Lebove 
John  F.  Martin 
John  E.  Mathison 
Edward  H.  Mattick 
Wilford  McCabe 
Wa\-ne  H.  McCoy 
William  L.  McCreary 
Alvin  McGee 
William  J.  ileyer 
Joy  F.  .Miller 
Dennis  J.  Mitchell 
.\belino  Montano 
Henry  Xoltensmier 
Edward  J.  Panknin 


Orae  Pierce 
Allen  A.  Posegay 
William  T.  Robeison 
William  G.  Robinson 
Felix  J.  Roman 
Arthur  P.  Roscoe 
David  A.  Scheer 
Charles  Scott 
William  M.  Shelton 
Louis  Simons 
Thomis  R.  Snyder 
George  Stanton 
Emil  Swanson 
William  B.  Swick 
Joseph  Todiro 
James  W.  Tut  tie 
John  Vaughn 
rhomai  Woodburn 


1152; 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


-«♦- 


COMPANY  "C,"  54th  MACHINE  GUN  BATTALION 


Captain  John  G.  Deitz 


2nd  Lieut.  Joseph  W.  Rash 


2nd  Lieut.  Courtland  B.  Manifold 


Sergeants 
John  .\.  Mulcrone 
Harry  Yordon 
Thomas  R.  Billington 
Claude  J.  Fulfer 
Francis  M.  O'Neill 
Harvey  E.  HilsenhofE 
Grover  H.  Parker 

Corporals 
Ferdinand  Nehls 
Irving  Boardman 
.\rthur  R.  Jesse 
Joco  Popovich 
Porter  E.  Taylor 
Homer  Vinson 
LanTence  F.  Werner 
William  M.  Gilsenan 


Cook 
Richard  Elkins 

Privates — First  Class 
Walter  S.  Bauer 
Ober  W.  Chaplin 
Joseph  B.  Dothard 
Clarence  Haigh 
Raymond  L.  Harrison 
Lenos  A.  Jackson 
Asa  J.  Kellam 
Arthur  H.  Loesch 
Jeremiah  J.  Murphy 
Talmage  Snider 
Julius  L.  Smilovitz 


Privates 
.\xel  Anderson 
Odis  F.  Barrow 
William  J.  Bannon 
Francis  P.  Blackburn 
Benjamin  S.  Blackman 
Guy  Boring 
Thomas  C.  Bruno 
Calegero  Call 
Marion  W.  Cames 
John  J.  Carr 
WiUiam  L.  Carson 
Joseph  P.  Donohue 
Louis  Eisenberg 
Charles  F.  Farmer 
Mathew  M.  Gaedert 
Joseph  T.  Gannon 
John  C.  Hartman 


John  E.  Hegardt 
George  J.  Hillgoth 
Theodore  A.  Hintz 
Claude  Horn 
William  T.  Horton 
John  E.  Hoscheit 
Thomas  H.  Jennings 
William  C.  Jones 
John  C.  Karn 
James  O.  King 
John  G.  Kirwan 
Bruce  Kizer 
George  A.  Knott 
Fredrick  S.  Kuhnlohe 
Joseph  L.  Lee 
Edward  A.  Littlejohn 
William  H.  Littlejohn 
George  H.  McKinnon 


Adie  L.  McWhorter 
Blaggoya  Mrvosh 
Noble  E.  Nordahl 
John  Oliver,  Jr. 
James  L.  Patterson 
Einar  Pearson 
John  Petrucci 
Raymond  E.  Place 
Prince  E.  Robinson 
Victor  Schneider 
Lacey  H.  Short 
Raymond  O.  Steward 
George  Stolp 
Benjamin  A.  Tanner 
WilUam  G.  Wagner 
Asa  C.  Wolf 
Jesse  C.  Woodlief 
WilUam  M.  Wright 


COMPANY  "D,"  54th  MACHINE  GUN  BATTALION 


Captain  William  O.  White  2nd  Lieut.  Lawrence  F.  Nelson  2nd  Lieut.  John  A.  Toepfer 

1st  Sergeant  A.  W.  Kantin  Supply  Sergeant  C.  H.  Nauheimer 


Sergeants 
L.  P.  McKinney 
H.  L.  Hale 
C.  A.  Grover 
J.  A.  Reed 

Corporals 
O.  H.  Treutelaar 

A.  W.  Horn 

B.  G.  Joseph 

C.  F.  Enerson 
C.  E.  Green 
F.  Bucholtz 
J.  Stewart 
W.  B.  Wade 

Cooks 
M.  E.  Eagan 
A.  J.  Parent 


E.  J.  Dahl 
A.  Connely 

Mechanic 
A.  L.  Davis 

Buglers 
E.  M.  Lots 
P.  A.  Brawand 

Privates — First  Class 
E.  Alexander 
K.  H.  Bahmed 
P.  W.  Gilmore 
J.  Hickman 
C.  Kilgore 
E.  J.  Kotlar 
H.  McGlamery 
H.  A.  Pomerening 


Privates 
W.  W.  Bean 

E.  Borden 
W.  Boen 

W.  T.  Brooks 
P.  F.  Conn 

F.  L.  Cunningham 
J.  R.  Davis 

J.  F.  Dougherty 
H.  B.  Downing 
J.  Glantz 

C.  M.  Holbrook 

G.  M.  Hethco.x 
J.  C.  Holley 
A.  J.  Hughes 
W.  E.  Herndon 
H.  D.  Hamby 
O.  J.  Honsinger 

D.  L.  Holting 


P.  Iwan 
P.  Johnson 
J.  C.  Koenig 
J.  M.  Kyser 
W.  L.  Koch 
T.  E.  Lauterdale 
S.  E.  Lamb 
M.  Lyons 
W.  H.  Meyer 
S.  Majercik 

A.  G.  Meisner 

B.  O.  Miller 
J.  M.  Murry 
E.  L.  Moses 
H.  E.  McLain 
S.  McGowan 
L.  S.  McGinnes 
H.  Ogle 


J.  C.  Pionke 
R.  S.  Peyovich 

F.  S.  Parrill 
A.  Peek 

L.  H.  Perkins 
H.  G.  Puckett 
H.  O.  Poelke 
L.  D.  Reynolds 
L.  G.  Snider 
J.  O.  Stewart 

G.  M.  Stuart 
M.  L.  Stein 

A.  M.  Turner 

B.  R.  Thoren 

F.  K.  VanAntwerp 
A.  L.  Wyatt 
L.  G.  Weckner 
J.  J.  Zupancis 


153 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


CAPTAIN  FARRIS  AND  STAFF,  52nd  MACHINE  GUN  BATTALION 

Left  to  right 
CapUin  G.  B.  Farris  1st  Lieut.  H.  C.  May,  M.  C.  2nd  Lieut.  Glen  Bradley 


2nd  Lieut.  H.  Nowicki 


FIFTY- SECOND  MACHINE  GUN  BATTALION 

A  Two-Company  Vehicle  of  Destruction 


HUMAN  beings  and  machines  are  sometimes  much 
aUke.  Some  function  smoothly,  ix)werfully  and 
accurately  because  they  are  made  that  way. 
Others  rattle  and  bang  and  cause  no  end  of  trouble  be- 
cause some  parts  were  not  fashioned  or  finished  correctly. 
Sometimes  humans  and  machines  even  have  like  histories, 
and  that  brings  us  to  the  Fifty-second  Machine  Gun 
Battalion. 

The  Browning  machine  gun  got  a  great  deal  of  space  in 
the  newspapers  once  because  it  committed  a  great  military 
offense — being  late.  But  when  it  finally  arrived!  Well, 
to-day  Browning  and  machine  gun  mean  the  same;  others 
are  referred  to  by  name. 

The  Fifty-second  Machine  Gun  Battalion,  like  the 
Browning  gun,  got  a  late  start.  When  the  infantry  of  the 
Eighteenth  Division  was  going  over  in  waves  and  turtle- 
backing  all  over  the  parade  and  starting  rumors  about 
when  we  get  over,  the  battalion  was  still  only  a  name. 
Then  a  few  officers  reported  from  the  machine  gun  Mecca 
— Camp  Hancock.  It  then  started  its  morning  report, 
official  sign  of  its  being.     A  few  days  later  the  K.  0.  re- 


ported and  the  little  two-company  vehicle  of  destruction 
started  on  its  way.  However,  it  didn't  go  far  during 
November,  for  when  the  wheels  of  the  vehicle  arrived  from 
Camp  Hancock  some  of  the  sturdy  spokes  had  the  measles 
and  went  into  quarantine.  The  body  arrived  in  pieces 
from  the  Nineteenth  Infantry  and  Thirty-fifth  Infantry 
and  went  into  another  barracks.  So  with  the  wheels  in 
one  barracks  and  the  body  in  another  November  left  the 
battalion  almost  where  it  found  it. 

Then  came  December  10th!  The  first  great  day  in  the 
annals  of  the  battalion !  On  that  day  the  quarantine  was 
lifted,  the  machine  assembled  for  the  first  time  and  the 
inspecting  general  ran  his  careful  eye  over  its  lines  and 
mechanism — and  was  pleased.  Since  then  the  divisional 
battalion  has  been  like  its  beloved  Browning,  functioning 
smoothly,  accurately,  and  without  stops  or  jams. 

The  Fifty-second  is  only  a  small  leaf  on  the  cactus  but 
it  has  a  tremendous  number  of  stickers.  Again  like  the 
Browning,  its  fire  power  is  large.  ^ 

And  if  the  big  inspeOtion  ever  comes,  the  Fifty-second 
will  be  found  smooth  and  free  from  burrs. 


154 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


COMPANY  "A,"  52nd  MACHINE  GUN  BATTALION 

1st  Lieut.  Charles  E.  Sweet  2nd  Lieut.  Yvo  R.  Grant  2nd  Lieut.  Clarence  J.  Pearson 

1st  Sergeant  Leo  J.  Bartulewicz  Supply  Sergeant  William  I.  HoUoway 


Sergeants 
James  Aloysius  Berry 
Armand  J.  Chaiffre 
Norbert  Riplinger 
George  A.  Viertel 

Corporab 
Henry  Bringmann 
Clarence  Tucker 
Samuel  Harris 
William  J.  McFalls 
Martin  Passolt 
Charles  C.  Piechowiak 

Cook 
Henry  W.  Wilson 

Privates 
Edgar  .\rmour 
Vurner  J.  Brumbelow 


Cari  K.  BuUard 
Thomas  F.  Broadhead 
James  M.  Brown 
George  Berman 
Ivan  M.  Bates 
Jesse  Baker 
Charles  Beerbohm 
Robert  W.  Booth 
Einar  Bemsten 
Clarence  W.  Bowman 
George  W.  Chester 
Thomas  B.  Carlton 
Leamon  J.  Council 
Clarence  E.  Campbell 
James  D.  Chapman 
Ora  H.  Crabill 
George  Dupree 
Solomon  D.  Dickeson 
Clarence  L.  Einertson 
Loyd  Echols 


Paul  W.  Ferguson 
John  W.  Fletcher 
Joseph  Friedman 
Bert  E.  Fleming 
Tom  E.  Fife 
Floyd  G.  Fralic 
Archie  M.  Garrett 
Elbony  E.  Green 
Tillman  A.  Gannaway 
Christopher  Gilbert 
Jones  V.  Graves 
Melvin  K.  Hanson 
Loyd  G.  Hargis 
Robert  J.  Hanson 
John  T.  Hitt 
Paul  T.  Hann 
Lorain  G.  Huffman 
John  E.  Hoellerich 
Fleetwood  A.  Hynes 
William  A.  Hunt 


Bert  L.  HoUingsworth 
Clarence  R.  Harmsworth 
Marvin  D.  Jones 
Peter  T.  Kabat 
Emil  G.  Kersten 
Clifford  W.  Lantz 
Marcy  Lubawy 
Clarence  Lawes 
James  R.  Lamb 
Charles  F.  McKinnis 
Walter  S.  McCombs 
Robert  J.  MacDermant 
Howard  G.  Mack 
William  P.  Moore 
OUie  N.  Means 
Dewey  S.  Miller 
Bumie  Mincks 
George  H.  Maske 
Virginio  A.  Malattia 
Cecil  Norton 


Arthur  M.  Oubre 
Ollie  E.  Pierce 
James  H.  Price 
James  A.  Powell 
James  Roach 
Frank  M.  Rivers 
Ludwig  Reiss 
Charhe  Roberson 
Harold  K.  Sylvester 
Rufus  H.  Shattuck 
Walter  Simmons 
William  H.  Strickland 
Frank  Stoneburg 
Cari  G.  Wunderiy 
Wm.  H.  White 
Harmon  F.  WoUeson 
George  E.  Wires 
William  R.  ZanelU 


155 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


COMPANY  ■B,'  o2nd  MACmXE  GUX  BATTALION 

Captain  James  G.  B.  Farris 
2nd  Lieut.  Charles  F.  Paraday  2nd  Lieut.  John  D.  Means 


Sergeants 

Privates 

Geo.  W.  Burdette 

Ray  .^dams 

Wilbur  R.  Current 

Ray  Adkins 

Geo.  P.  Elkas 

Richard  L.  Baker 

Max  Le\-y 

Harvey  C.  Banthin 

Everett  Maddy 

Guile  j.  Baty 

Clarence  A.  Pettis 

Carl  D.  Baxter 

John  G.  Moore 

Fred  0.  Beall 

Corporals 

John  R.  Bennitt 

Frank  Dede 

Eli  0.  Boyer 

Raj-mond  A.  German 

Ellis  R.  Brown 

Wm.  F.  McMillen 

James  P.  Burk 

Ramey  Morasky 

Claire  L.  Bush 

Si  vert  C.  Sivertson 

Frank  Calkins 

Ravmond  L.  Smith 

Daniel  B.  Cavenar 

John  C.  ToeUner 

Willis  F.  Chandler 

Cook 

Joseph  D.  Craig 

Willie  Crossley 

Leo  B.  Colley 

Harry  Dorfman 

Curtiss  C.  Dotson 
Raymond  H.  Dyer 
Wm.  C.  Enderud 
Hugh  J.  Fincher 
Morris  Gallups 
Neil  Gilchrist 
Oscar  A.  Gjellum 
Bennett  F.  Gordon 
John  A.  Gorey 
Lewis  B.  Green 
John  GrjTier 
Charles  I.  Hadsall 
Wm.  E.  Hammel 
Han  Hanson 
Lucius  L.  Harris 
Clarence  J.  Haskins 
Arthur  Haubrich 
Jos.  E.  Hickey 
Joe  Hinton 
Francis  H.  Hobgood 


Duaine  S.  Holmquist 
Herbert  H.  Hosea 
Clarence  R.  Hugi 
James  M.  Inks 
Walter  W.  Jacobi 
Theodore  O.  Jasper 
Clarence  R.  Keck 
Thos.  E.  Keiser 
John  Kelly 
Ix)uis  Krapf 
WiUie  O.  Lackey 
Chas.  H.  LaKamp 
Wm.  Lastovka 
Henr>'  W.  Libsack 
Richard  O.  Light 
Henry  A.  Marose 
Judson  L.  Martin 
Herbert  P.  Maxwell 
Lester  J.  McGuire 


Ervie  V.  Merritt 
Geo.  H.  Newsome 
Clarence  F.  Norton 
Jake  G.  Pantle 
Wm.  W.  Pa>-ne 
Chas.  J.  Randolph 
Claud  S.  Richman 
Jack  Riddle 
Thomas  A.  Seay 
Victor  B.  Shirk 
Ferdinand  Springer 
John  O.  Steele 
Charles  Dubra  Stinson 
Herman  G.  Swearinger 
Avery  E.  Teachout 
John  B.  Warren 
Herbert  Weichman 
Newton  J.  Wilson 
Morris  Wolowitz 


156 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


His  First  Fit — And — After  a^Little  Swapping 


157 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


BRIGADIER-GENERAL  BRIGGS 


BRIGADIER-GENERAL  RAYMOND  W.  BRIGGS 
came  from  the  Western  Front  to  take  command  of 
the  Eighteenth  Field  Artillery  Brigade;  but  that  is 
only  a  part  of  his  story,  for  it  has  been  his  exceptional 
fortune  to  see  service  three  different  times  in  as  many 
different  capacities  during  the  period  of  the  war. 

In  the  summer  of  1914,  having  concluded  a  tour  of  duty 
in  the  Far  East,  he  was  returning  to  the  United  States  by 
way  of  Siberia.  He  was  proceeding 
leisurely,  visiting  Russo-Japanese 
battlefields  as  he  progressed  west- 
ward. Eventually  he  expected  to 
get  into  Germany  in  time  to  watch 
the  annual  war  manoeuvers. 

What  he  did  see,  however,  was  the 
German  war  machine  in  action  in 
earnest.  News  of  the  beginning  of 
the  conflict  reached  him  in  a  small 
town  in  Russia.  All  previous  plans 
for  the  study  of  past  and  simulated 
battles  were  dismissed.  He  hurried 
on  to  see  a  real  war  and  arrived  in 
France  shortly  after  the  first  great 
German  rush  had  been  halted  at  the 
Marne. 

He    saw    some    fighting    on    the 
French  front,  and  finally  his  observa 
tions  took  him  to  Antwerp.     There 
he  saw  his  first  heavy  fighting  of  the 
war.     He  was  the   only  American 
oflicer  present  at  the  siege  of  Ant- 
werp, and  through  the  courtesy  of 
the  Belgian  military  oflScials  he  was 
given  unusual  opportunities  to  wt- 
ness   the    actions   that   took   place 
around  the  beleaguered  city.     When  he  returned  to   the 
United  States  he  brought  to  the  War  Department  the 
first  authentic   report  of   the   existence  of   the   famous 
42-centimetre  gun. 

His  second  appearance  in  the  war  zone  was  with  General 
Pershing  and  the  first  American  Expeditionary  Force. 
He  accompanied  the  expedition  as  chief  of  the  Remount 
Service. 

"I  would  have  preferred  duty  in  the  line,"  he  said,  "but 
I  would  have  scrubbed  floors  gladly  for  the  privilege  of 
going." 

He  returned  to  the  United  States  at  the  close  of  1917, 
but  in  the  interim  he  had  seen  action  on  many  fronts — 
at  Ypres,  Verdun  and  at  Cambrai,  scene  of  the  initially 
successful  but  eventually  unsuccessful  British  offensive. 


RAYMOND  W.  BRIGGS, 
Commanding  18th  F.  A.  Brigade 


All  this  time,  however,  he  had  been  wishing  for  duty  in 
the  line,  for  as  chief  of  the  Remount  Service  he  was  only 
able  to  obser\'e  the  fighting,  and  then  only  when  his  duties 
and  the  occasion  permitted.  The  wish  finally  materialized 
in  his  transfer  to  the  United  States  for  assignment  to  the 
311th  Field  Artillery,  79th  Division,  at  Camp  Meade.  He 
was  transferred  in  April,  1918,  to  the  304th  Field  Artillery, 
77th  Division,  at  Camp  Upton. 

He  went  to  war  a  third  time,  and 
this  time  got  into  it  as  completely  as 
he  had  wished.  His  regiment,  the 
304th,  was  the  first  National  Army 
field  artUlery  regiment  to  land  in 
France.  After  the  usual  period  at 
a  training  centre,  General,  then 
Colonel  Briggs  took  his  batteries  to 
the  Alsace  sector,  and  thence  to 
Chateau  Thierry,  where  the  fighting 
qualities  of  the  American  soldier 
were  forever  established. 

Colonel  Briggs  was  working  on  an 
order,  preparatory  to  the  crossing  of 
the  Vesle  when  a  telephone  call  from 
headquarters  notified  him  of  his  pro- 
motion to  brigadier-general.  This 
removed  him  from  command  of  the 
304th  Field  Artillery  and  sent  him, 
in  company  with  other  general  ofli- 
cers,  to  watch  the  operations  that 
effectually  flattened  out  the  St.  Mihiel 
salient,  a  danger  point  for  Allied  arms 
since  the  first  days  of  the  war. 

General  Briggs  came  back  to  the 
United  States,  fully  expecting  to  score 
his  fourth  trip  to  the  war  during  the 
winter,  .\lthough  the  Germans  were  retreating  steadily, 
Allied  commanders  did  not  believe  that  the  Prussian  ma- 
chine was  going  to  pieces,  and  they  fully  expected  another 
summer  of  fighting.  Such  was  the  assumption  upon 
which  American  headquarters  was  working,  and  the  Cactus 
Division  was  to  be  one  of  the  first  organizations  to  arrive 
in  France  for  training  preparatory  to  the  beginning  of  the 
big  drive  in  the  spring.  As  it  happened,  however.  General 
Briggs  took  command  of  the  Eighteenth  Field  Artillery 
Brigade  two  weeks  before  the  armistice  was  signed. 

General  Briggs  entered  the  army  during  the  Spanish- 
American  war.  He  was  originally  commissioned  in  the 
cavalry  and  was  graduated  from  the  Mounted  Service 
School.  He  is  greatly  interested  in  athletics,  particularly 
football,  and  in  flying.     He  has  driven  his  own  plane. 


158 


CAMP    TRAVIS    AND    THE    WORLD    WAR 


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[159] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


FIFTY- SECOND  FIELD  ARTILLERY 

They'll  Never  Forget.  Their  Cavalry  Days 


AND  so  after  all  it  was  true.  The  orders  had  just 
been  received  from  the  Adjutant  General  of  the 
Army  directing  that  the  303rd  Cavalry  Regiment 
be  divided  into  two  parts,  each  of  which  was  to  form  the 
nucleus  of  a  regiment  of  field  artillery.  As  Col.  S.  McP. 
Rutherford  read  the  letter  to  the  assembled  officers  at 
Camp  Stanley,  Texas,  August  14,  1918,  a  flood  of  ques- 
tions and  doubt  rushed  into  the  mind  of  each  officer  and 
an  intense  silence  filled  the  room. 

It  was  indeed  an  occasion  for  doubt  and  wonder. 
Could  a  regiment  of  cavalry,  trained  and  drilled  as  such 
for  over  six  months,  be  taught  to  lay  aside  their  traditions, 
their  love  and  their  pride  in  the  cavalry,  and  to  enter  with 
the  necessary  zeal  and  singleness  of  purpose  into  another 
indefinite  period  of  training  in  another  branch  of  the  ser- 
^^ce?  Could  officers  who  had  never  heard  the  crash  of  a 
three-inch  field  piece  hope  to  become  instructors  in  artil- 
lery in  the  short  space  of  time  intervening  between  that 
time  and  the  time  when  they  must  commence  the  intensive 
training  laid  down  by  the  Chief  of  Field  Artillery? 

They  doubted  that  it  could  be  done.  The  outlook  was 
not  alluring.  They  would  have  to  learn  the  principles  of 
field  artillery  before  they  could  teach  them,  and  this 
meant  weeks  of  hard  study  and  practise,  but  they  resolved 
that  they  would  do  their  best,  and  set  about  the  task  of 
changing  their  organizations  into  artillery  with  a  will. 
All  surplus  cavalry  equipment  and  horses  were  at  once 
turned  in,  and  after  much  discussion  and  consideration  it 
was  decided  how  the  regiment  was  to  be  spht. 

On  the  morning  of  August  21,  1918,  two  columns  of 
cavalry  marched  out  of  Camp  Stanley,  at  Leon  Springs, 
and  headed  toward  Camp  Travis,  which  was  to  be  their 
new  station.  One  of  these  columns  was  the  nucleus  of  the 
Fifty-second  Field  Artillery.  At  its  head  rode  Col.  S. 
]McP.  Rutherford,  accompanied  by  Major  Lewis  G.  Wal- 
lace, Captain  Joe  M.  Daniel,  adjutant;  Chaplain  W.  C. 
Moffett,  and  Lieut.  C.  P.  Bigger,  personnel  adjutant. 
They  were  followed  by  Troops  A,  B,  C,  D,  E,  and  F,  one- 
half  of  the  Headquarters  Troop  and  one-half  of  the  Supply 
Company,  totalling  about  650  enhsted  men  and  30  officers. 
Although  officially  they  were  a  regiment  of  artillery,  at 
heart  and  in  appearance  they  were  still  cavalry,  for  they 
still  wore  yellow  hat  cords,  and  they  sang 
and  whistled  cavalry  tunes  as  they  trotted 
along  in  troop  formation  toward  Camp 
Travis.  Early  in  the  afternoon  they 
reached  their  new  quarters  in  Camp  Travis, 
and  by  night  were  beginning  to  feel  as 
though  they  belonged  here. 

It  was  about  ten  days  later  that  the 
yellow  hat  cords  were  changed  for  red,  and 
not  imtil  the  middle  of  September  did  the 
first  of  the  artillery  material  commence  to 
arrive.     Meanwhile  each    man   had    been 


trying  to  familiarize  himself  with  the  artillery  terms  that 
applied  to  the  organization  and  drills,  but  as  late  as  the 
first  of  October  some  of  the  older  cavalrymen  still  un- 
consciously referred  to  batteries  as  troops  and  to  bat- 
talions as  squadrons. 

Upon  receipt  of  the  first  artillery  material,  the  regiment 
commenced  its  period  of  intensive  training.  It  was  most 
difficult  for  the  first  few  weeks,  for  the  instruction  was 
hampered  by  lack  of  necessary  equipment  and  qualified 
artillery  instructors.  These  conditions  were  not  to  last 
long,  however,  for  shortly  after  the  middle  of  September 
a  number  of  field  artillery  officers  were  assigned  to  the 
regiment  from  Camp  Zachary  Taylor,  and  a  few  days 
later  Lieut.-Col.  Clyde  McConkey  reported  for  duty. 
From  then  on  artillery  officers  were  constantly  being  as- 
signed to  the  regiment,  including  many  who  had  just  re- 
turned from  overseas,  and  the  training  was  given  a  new 
impetus. 

Many  of  the  former  cavalry  officers  had  already  been 
ordered  to  attend  the  School  of  Fire  at  Ft.  Sill,  and  the 
first  of  October  Colonel  Rutherford,  Major  Wallace,  and 
Captain  Daniel  left  for  Ft.  Sill  to  take  the  course  in  artil- 
lery firing.  This  left  Lieut.-Col.  McConkey  in  com- 
mand of  the  regiment. 

It  was  early  seen  that  in  order  to  increase  the  morale  of 
the  regiment  and  give  it  that  spirit  which  is  essential  to  an 
artillery  regiment  special  steps  must  be  taken  to  eradicate 
all  remaining  influences  of  former  cavalry  days,  and 
to  replace  them  by  artillery  songs,  stories,  and  traditions. 
The  men  were  taught  to  learn  and  to  hke  the  rollicking 
songs  of  the  artillery;  regimental  yells  were  taught;  a 
regimental  seal  was  selected  and  regimental  stationery 
distributed.  An  entertainment  unit  and  a  jazz  orchestra 
were  formed  under  the  direction  of  Corporal  Noble,  of  the 
Headquarters  Company.  A  foot-ball  team  was  rounded 
into  shape  by  Lieutenant  Cogbill,  and  has  had  its  goal  line 
crossed  only  once  in  the  six  games  it  has  played. 

In  social  activities  this  regiment  has  again  proven  itself 
the  leader,  for  the  parties  given  by  the  officers  of  the 
Fifty-second  Field  Artillery  will  always  stand  out  as  the 
chief  social  attractions  in  San  Antonio  during  the  winter 
of  1918-1919.  There  was  the  Hallowe'en  party  held  in 
the  K.  of  C.Hall — the  first  large  social  event 
of  the  season,  and  Thanksgiving  evening  the 
first  formal  dance  held  in  San  Antonio  since 
the  beginning  of  the  war  was  given  by  the 
officers  of  this  regiment  at  the  St.  Anthony. 
We  are  proud  of  our  regiment,  and  justly 
so,  we  think.  We  have  accompUshed  what 
at  first  seemed  impossible — made  artillery- 
men out  of  cavalrymen  and  have  taught 
them  to  love  their  regiment  and  their 
branch  of  the  service.  We  have  been 
tested  and  have  passed  the  test. 


160; 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


COLONEL  McP.  RUTHERFORD  AND  STAFF,  52nd  FIELD  ARTILLERY 


Front  row,  left  to  right 
Colonel  Samuel  McP.  Rutherford  Lieut.  Colonel  Clyde  McConkey 

Captain  Joe  M.  Daniel  Chaplain  William  C.  Moffett 

Second  row 
2nd  Lieut.  John  J.  O'Reilly  1st  Lieut.  Bispham  Emerson 

2nd  Lieut.  Jessie  A.  Turner 


Major  Lewis  G.  Wallace 

1st  Lieut.  George  I.  Badeaux,  M.  C. 


161] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


.^  ^-^ 


HEADQUARTERS   COMPANY,  62nd  FIELD  ARTILLERY 
Captain  Joe  M.  Daniel 


1st  Lieut.  Murray  W.  Craig 
1st  Lieut.  Tom  G.  Estes 
2nd  Lieut.  John  J.  O'Reilly 
2nd  Lieut.  Jesse  A.  Turner 
2nd  Lieut.  Homer  M.  Cooper 


2nd  Lieut.  George  L.  Hawkinson 
Regimental  Sargeant  Major  Lloyd  D.  Bower 
Regimental  Sergeant  Major  Frank  A.  Brown 
1st  Sergeant  Walter  Adkins 
Color  Sergeant  Fred  Halliday 


Color  Sergeant  Daniel  M.  Shannon 
Supply  Sergeant  Mark  J.  Gregory 
Mess  Sergeant  Edward  H.  Ferguson 
Stable  Sergeant  Aimer  F.  Moore 


Sergeants 

Benjamin  F.  Pool 
Thomas  W.  Nelms 
Gustav  E.  Johnson 
George  W.  Frels 
Harold  C.  Van  Hise 

Corporals 

Thomas  E.  Griffith 
Calvin  N.  Noble 
Oscar  L.  Ely 
Frank  Muhic 
Thomas  W.  Reilly 

Cooks 

William  Blarney 
Orin  W.  Stone 

Horseshoers 

John  C.  Bailey 
Willie  E.  Kinard 


Saddler 

John  Stovall 

Privates — First  Class 

Ruben  .\brams 
Walter  V.  Briney 
.Arthur  J.  Helmer 
Edgar  O.  Hiller 
George  M.  Messer 
Henry  A  PoUitz 
Felix  B.  Probandt 
Ralph  B.  Scott 
Albert  Sills 
Erwin  C.  Techmer 

Privates 

Sam  Barahtaris 
Guiseppe  Cacase 
Lawrence  H.  Knighton 
Frank  Mikutis 
Harold  R.  Sherman 
Archie  Slutzker 


Carrol  E.  Teeter 
Robert  N.  Westmoreland 
Charles  R.  Wilson 

Band  Section 
Sergeant  Bugler 
Ely  S.  Avery 

Band  Sergeants 

Richard  F.  O'Reilly 
Kittrell  G.  Durst 

Band  Corporals 

Otto  H.  Anderson 
Glen  H.  Nothstein 
Sidney  J.  Kring 
Mark  H.  Lindeman 

Musicians — First  Class 

Poe  Clark 
Percy  W.  Jenkins 


Musicians — Second  Class 

Don  Cude 
Henry  J.  Havlik 
William  Streitberger 
Frank  Stomber 
Fred  N.  Swedenberg 
John  A.  White 
Leonard  H.  Young 


Musicians — ^Third  Class 

Tarrance  V.  Lipps 
George  B.  Pasek 


Ordnance  Detachment 
Privates 

John  Bradford 
Richard  F.  Davey 


[162: 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


SUPPLY  COMPANY,  52nd  FIELD  ARTILLERY 


Ist  Lieut.  Bispham  H.  Emerson,  Commanding 
Firpt  Sergeant  Stable  Sergeant 

Frank  L  Dickson  Hal  A.  Ewing 


2nd  Lieut.  Aaron  B.  Griffing 


2nd  Lie\it.  George  P.  Griffith 


Regt.  Supply  Sergts. 

Harold  W.  Biddle 
Benjamin  Wilcox 

Supply  Sergeant 
Benjamin  Sturm 


Corporal 
Tami  Dutchak 

Horseshoers 

Irwin  W.  Oliver 
Joseph  Taucher 


Saddler 
William  Dow 

Cooks 

Charles  C.  Dyer 
Rudrick  A.  Hanson 
Joseph  E.  Faulkner 

Wagoners 
Martin  Andersen 


James  A.  Avers 
Edward  A.  Baiel 
Michael  Beldest 
Theodore  A.  Berg 
Charles  Bohen 
John  Burnam 
John  L.  S.  Blocker 
Oscar  L.  Daniel 
Benjamin  F.  Douglas 
Nicholas  Fitzgerald 
Carlos  H.  Johns 


Hprry  F.  W.  Keuch 
Grant  Kricder 
James  U.  LaMaster 
Fred  Manthe 
Samuel  E.  Stacks 
John  Seme 
Charles  B.  Sandquist 
Pius  Stauffer 
George  Whitmore 
Yoncie  A.  Wiley 
Continued  on  page  171 


163 


CAMP    TRAVIS     AND    THE    WORLD    WAR 


BATTERY  "A,"  52nd  FIELD  ARTILLERY 

Captain  Claude  M.  Howard 

1st  Lieut.  Oscar  T.  LeBeau  1st  Lieut.  Frank  V.  Farr  2nd  Lieut.  Edward  W.  Treen  2nd  Lieut.  Fiederick  G.  Crane,  Jr. 

2nd  Lieut.  Harold  O  Hoppe  1st  Sergeant  Buell  L.  Boles  Supply  Sergeant  Joseph  C  Patton 

Stable  Sergeant  Charles  J.  Roche  Mess  Sergeant  Emil  A.  Prust 


Sergeants 

James  A.  Thome 
John  A.  RaU 
Paul  Majka 
William  A.  Pohlman 
Robert  E.  Cooney 
John  V.  Jones 
Alvah  W.  Oliver 
Byron  Harrison 
Charles  L.  Werry 
WilyO  Zachry 

Corporals 

Homer  Johnson 
William  E.  Collier 
Russell  H.  Cronoble 
Carl  A  Wise 
Ben  H.  Beaty 
Ernest  J.  Bowman 
Charles  N.  Minor 
Robert  Gunther 
Earl  Mathis 

Mechanics 

Reverdy  R.  Wilmot 
Horrace  F.  Fry 
Carl  T.  Frick? 


Horseshoers 
George  W.  Blaine 
W=lliam  D.  O'Connor 
Carl  O.  Swedberg 

Saddler 
William  S.  Thomas 

Cooks 
Chin  S.  Tong 
James  R.  Nelson 
Harry  E.  Parshall 

Buglers 
Thomas  O  Naron 
Berardino  DeMatteo 
John  J  Filkowski 

Privates — First  Class 
John  Fendrych 
Frank  Langley 
Kanstanty  Schumel 
Smoin  Taweel 
Sterling  T.  WaLace 
Noah  W.  Simpson 
Roy  L.  Stevens 
William  C.  Acton 
Leonard  E.  Barkley 
William  H.  Biker 
Patrick  F.  Boyle 


Thomas  Blamey 
Hulan  F.  Butler 
Alfred  E.  Bird 
John  F.  Banta 
Albert  R.  Buntin,  Jr. 
Julian  E.  Baker 
Leon  W.  Brooks 
Paul  Campana 
A.  Dee  Carroll 
Harrison  M.  Cline 
Arthur  H.  Dinkelman 
Clarence  E.  Durham 
Wilh'am  N.  Davis 
.Silas  C.  England 
Horace  Evans 
Bernhard  Freund 
Lloyd  E.  Frankson 
Murty  L.  Fahy 
Edward  D.  Greithouse 
Castulo  Gonzales 
Arthur  L.  Groves 
Bert  L.  Gumm 
Elchard  Herring 
Arthur  C  Hampton 
Leonard  D.  Haney 
Edward  J.  Harmon 
Marshall  Jackson 
Robert  L,  Lakey 
Charlie  J.  Lowke 
Patrick  Lark 


John  Lorber 
George  F.  Lee 
Joseph  Lewinski 
William  C.  Manley 
Barrett  S.  Mace 
Jesse  W.  McGuire 
Isaac  N.  McMennamy 
Hugh  J.  Martin.  Jr. 
Edward  L.  Murphy 
Thomas  M.  Murphy 
Raymond  J.  McNulty 
Robert  W.  McLemore 
James  C.  Nance 
Percival  D.  Paiscns 
Edward  Raymond 
John  F.  Russell 
Thomas  W.  Scott 
Jasper  J.  Sexton 
Jessp  Sykes 
Duncan  R.  Sanders 
Orval  A.  Todd 
Orton  Townsend 
Walter  A.  Tipton 
Tony  Vinardi 
Ned  O.  Wallace 
John  D.  Watson 
Saul  Williams 
Arthur  M.  Weis.s 
Elmer  Young 


i'fUiliaM: 


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[164] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


m 


BATTERY  "B,"  52nd  FIELD  ARTILLERY 


Captain  William  H.  Burns 


1st  Lieut.  Charles  N.  Hobson 


1st  Lieut.  Robert  M.  Cathcart 
1st  Lieut.  Eugene  C.  Crowl 
2nd  Lieut.  Alden  F.  Brodt 


2nd  Lieut.  George  E.  Benson 
2nd  Lieut.  Den^el  T.  Sheppard 
1st  Sergeant  Joseph  O.  Gruber 


Mess  Sergeant  Frank  Brunchwiler 
Supply  Sergeant  Garland  E.  Gradv 
Stable  Sergeant  George  W.  Wallace 


Sergeants 
Jasper  E.  Bond 
James  Collins 
Otto  E.  Monow 
Henry  B.  McWhorter 
Warren  A.  Norman 
Whit  O.  Russell 
Grover  D.  Rainbolf 
Dee  O.  Sewell 
Benjamin  A.  Terrill 
Frank  A.  ThoU 

Corporals 
Edward  S.  Clayton 
William  E.  Doss 
Burtis  R.  Edson 
George  F.  Ellis 
Bradley  F.  George 
Dock  Humphers 
WilUe  W.  Milmer 
Edward  S.  Reid 
Lem  Williams 

Chief  Mechanic 
Charles  B.  Holmes 

Mechanic 
George  H.  Wischhusen 

Cooks 
Bart  G.  Farr 
Barney  Rizzo 


Jacob  G.  Shor 
Jamie  C.  Smith 

Horseshoers 
Mathew  G.  Buchanan 
Mansur  S.  DeWitt 
Joseph  Stachursk! 

Saddler 
Rowan  Green 

Buglers 
James  A.  Byms 
William  J.  Connelly 
Paul  H.  Yovino 

Privates — First  Class 
Felix  C.  Barnes 
Lois  F.  Bonner 
James  A.  Boyle 
David  Browne 
James  E.  Crane 
Willie  R.  Hayman 
Albert  W.  Hunt 
Bert  R.  Jacobson 
Roman  Kabat 
Frank  E.  Krolak 
Harry  H.  Marion 
Virl  L.  McGinnis 
Michael  J.  Mongan 
Austin  C.  Murray 
Edward  Nolan 


Hermon  Owens 
Fred  Picture 
Stephen  A.  Prayannis 
Carlton  S  Priestley 
Floyd  L.  Rosencrants 
Vincent  W.  Skibinski 
Anthony  St>ibenvall 
Ura  J.  Tribbey 
Walter  Trojanoski 
Nick  Van  Deraa 
John  P.  Wachowiak 
Henry  C.  Waldschmidt 
General  L.  Williams 
Edward  W.  Younger 

Privates 
Burtis  Adkins 
Joel  L.  Baugh 
Bob  T  Bethune 
Michael  Bulawski 
Castas  Caras 
Michael  J.  Carney 
John  H.  Clark 
Charles  A.  Criswell 
Thomas  Curran 
Thaddeus  C.  Duncan 
Harry  M.  Evenden 
Jim  H.  Glover 
Joseph  Grzesiak 
John  Henry 
Claude  L.  Hendrick 
Robert  H.  Holmes 


James  O.  Hopson 
Charles  Knibb 
Kazimier  Konieczka 
Dallas  G.  Lankford 
Arthur  J  Lee 
Horace  H.  Lee 
Robert  E.  Long 
Ralph  W.  Markgraf 
James  P.  McCagbren 
Comelious  C.  Mitchell 
David  C.  Newman 
William  Padgett 
Henry  J.  Reynolds 
Fredrick  Rudis 
Henry  F.  Scherwat 
WUliam  T.  Schueck 
Lan  Smith 
Tommie  C.  Smith 
Jasper  N.  Smithee 
Jerry  Sebranek 
Joel  M.  Tate 
Hazard  G.  Ufford 
Edward  Verhelst 
Chester  C.  Vawter 
Robert  B.  Wade 
Carl  Westergreen 
John  M.  WiU 


;53^' i  \Au^'  '  i? 


[165] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


BATTERY  "C,"  52nd  FIELD  ARTILLERY 


1st  Lieut.  Andrew  A.  Manning 
1st  Lieut.  David  H.  Stark 
2nd  Lieut.  W.  L.  Taylor 
2nd  Lieut.  Lofton  V.  Maddox 


2nd  Lieut.  Barton  Griffith 
2nd  Lieut.  R.  E.  Renstrom 
2nd  Lieut.  Talmadge  Baker 


1st  Sergeant  Charles  L.  Wood 
Mess  Sergeant  William  .\.  Conrad 
Supply  Sergeant  Benjamin  J.  Heiman 
Stable  Sergeant  Joseph  Strassl 


Sergeants 
Peter  S.  Gust 
Walter  J.  Sachsel 
Earl  H.  Jones 
Meredith  Wood 
Jesse  L.  Garner 
Lester  E.  Leffler 
Maxey  L.  Gatewood 
WiUiam  R.  White 
William  H.  Harkins 
Ernest  Daugherty 

Corporals 
Frank  A.  Schwerdt 
Emil  A.  Hoelscher 
Robert  C.  Henry 
Ernest  WeUbom 
Paul  F.  Sullivan 
John  V.  Nipp 
Herman  Brown 
John  B.  Elkins 
Harris  L.  Stephens 
Quincy  C.  Davis 
Henry  B.  Hughes 


Richard  J.  Hosea 
William  W.  Kyle 
John  W.  Moss 
Clinton  E.  Vancil 
Colbert  Wilkerson 

Chief  Mechanic 
Thomas  I.  King 

Cooks 
Hermenegildo  Carrillo 
Harry  Hensley 
.\ndrevv  Glon 
James  H.  E.  Shain 

Horseshoe  rs 
Frank  Bennett 
Ysmael  Hernandez 

Saddler 
Albert  E.  Zunked 

Mechanic 
John  H.  Goebel 


Bugler — First  Class 
Oscar  J.  Shaw 

Privates — First  Class 
James  Collins 
Gardner  L.  Croy 
Orie  G.  FuUingim 
Boles  L.  Gajewski 
Warren  B.  Hardy 
Edwin  C.  Krizan 
Harry  L.  Miller 
Jesse  Patton 
Roy  F.  Ray 
Elbert  M.  Roberts 
Cleveland  Tippey 
William  N.  Wilbanks 

Privates 
Herman  W.  .\bel 
Wiley  J.  .Andrews 
Richard  X.  Barkley 
James  Bisignoli 
Charles  R.  Blakeley 
George  J.  Bliss 


John  Bozek 
Demon  D.  Breeland 
Ira  R.  Brj-an 
William  M.  Br\-son 
Ewell  M.  Bulla'rd 
Frank  J.  Burke 
Higinio  Cardenas 
Ova  B.  Clawson 
John  B.  Clonan 
Michael  F.  Daley 
Luther  Deborde 
Lawrence  F.  Demato 
John  W.  Franklin 
Wilmoth  C.  Harmon 
Charles  W.  Henderson 
Jesse  L.  Hyten 
Magee  Jamail 
Michael  Kemo 
William  M.  Ketcham 
Willis  A.  Hill 
Roland  Layton 
William  H.  McBride 
.Altage  O.  McElhannon 
Paul  Mariott 


Jeo  Matthews 
George  O'Reilly 
August  H.  Osterman 
Mack  Overton 
Charles  J.  Parmese 
Robert  C.  Payne 
William  M.  Purdie 
Joseph  Radzevicz 
Russell  J.  Reed 
Walter  Reeves 
Leslie  B.  Robinson 
John  Rolinc 
Umberto  Savoia 
William  C.  Shiffer 
Walter  Simmons 
Walter  Simmons 
Walter  E.  Spitzner 
Harvey  H.  Sportsman 
Jess  F.  Stunson 
Hjalmer  Swanson 
Marcello  Tonso 
Fred  Tucker 
Thomas  Turner 
Lonnie  Wiese 


[166] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


mm* 


i 


•>'>ia 


•BATTERY  "D,"  52nd  FIELD  ARTILLERY 


Lieut.  Wm.  L.  Covington 

1st  Lieut.  Maurice  K.  Cummings 

Supply  Sergeant  Joseph  S.  Herrington 


Sergeants 

Harry  Moskowitz 
Charles  Lauritzen 
George  D.  Sparks 
Albert  E.  Chauvet 
Frederick  Ford 
Jack  B.  HaU 
Emmitt  L.  Holmes 
Milan  T.  Mitrovitch 
Paul  Schmidt 
Lee  Vann 

Corporals 
John  T.  Boone 
Andrew  B.  Carothers 
Henry  H.  French 
Edward  S.  Herington 
Roy  J.  Hanson 
Ralph  G.  Isenhower 
Thomas  C.  Jennings 
Albert  Kruckemer 
Herbert  Locke 
Earl  S.  Mills 
Joseph  Podwin 
Delino  Roudebush 
Downing  Young 

Cooks 
James  T.  Hudson 
Enrod  A.  Palm 
C.  Thomas  Riley 


1st  Lieut.  Marcus  A.  Cogbill 
2nd  Lieut.  .\mos  P.  Quinn 

Mess  Sergeant  Theodore  B.  Alexopulos 


2nd  Lieut.  William  T.  Cook 
1st  Sergeant  Jess  Nelms 


Horseshoer 
Henry  S.  Thrasher 

Saddler 
Richard  W.  Arnold 

Mechanic 
Ernest  L.  Evans 

Bugler 
Frank  Muhie 

Privates — First  Class 

Johnie  E.  Baccus 
James  Best 
Louis  Covelli 
John  Dera 
James  T.  Ferguson 
Samuel  Fript 
Andrew  L.  Hamilton 
Clyde  M.  Hern 
William  E.  Loebe 
Freeman  R.  Nelson 
Philip  Nussbaum 
Henry  J.  Oliver 
Ernest  L.  Radmacher 
Arthur  L.  Reece 
Carl  Roos 
Earl  E.  Rudder 
George  Sawin 
Walter  W.  Smolinski 
Tuskey  L.  Walker 


Privates 
Albert  Armstrong 
Frank  Banasiak 
William  E.  Bowman 
Ralph  E.  Cavalieri 
Frank  H.  Devitt 
John  L.  Douglas 
George  W.  Dubie 
Ward  L.  Duvall 
John  P.  Gardella 
Charles  E.  Gentesse 
Nicholas  J.  Goetz 
Thomas  M.  Hamilton 
William  A.  Henderson 
John  Jazgar 
John  Krasinski 
Clarence  M.  Leister 
George  M.  Frye 
Frank  Loncor 
Tony  W.  Lochinger 
Floyd  W.  Maddux 
Louis  Miller 
Dominick  J.  Morley 
John  K.  Myrick 
James  W.  Neaves 
Otto  H.  A.  Neuber 
Otto  P.  Pool 
Earl  E.  Pratt 
Joseph  O.  Rees 
Guy  L.  Richardson 


Stable  Sergeant  Louis  Golka 

Guy  H.  Ricketts 
Richard  H.  Riedel 
Benito  Rodriguez 
Theodore  H.  Roegge 
John  Rolando 
Edward  Russell 
David  D.  Sayers 
Huston  W.  Seale 
Joseph  C.  Seets 
James  H.  Serff 
Louis  S.  SetliEE 
Fay  D.  Sheek 
Jesse  J.  Shields 
WiUiam  G.  Smith 
WiUiam  L.  Smith 
Albert  Spencer 
John  H.  Stephens 
Guy  H.  Stevenson 
Reed  Sumptor 
Arthur  D.  Switzer 
Sam  Tanksley 
James  R.  Thornton 
Levi  B.  Tikubbi 
P.  VoUbrecht 
Grover  C.  Walker 
WilUam  T.  Warr 
William  Wede 
Knut  A.  R.  Wieslander 
Lonie  Wilkinson 
Sara  Wood 
George  Wright 


Ut.'i 


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^^■•^MI:Ji^-ff-#- 


167 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


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nrrrjr 


BATTERY  "E,"  52nd  FIELD  ARTILLERY 
Captain  Clinton  M.  Lucas 


1st  Lieut.  George  P.  Shutt 
1st  Lieut.  William  S.  Cumming 


2nd  Lieut.  Homer  M.  Cooper 
2nd  Lieut.  William  F.  Catlin 


2nd  Lieut.  Sultan  G.  Cohen 
2nd  Lieut.  Clark  E.  William 


2nd  Lieut.  Graydon  E.  KHpple 
1st  Sergeant  Chester  D.  Moore 


Supply  Sergeant  William  M.  O'Malley         Stable  Sergeant  Glenn  W.  Morgensen  Mess  Sergeant  Robert  W.  Stephenson 


Sergeants 

Raymond  P.  Atkins 
Ned  Brown 
Edward  H.  Coyne 
Charles  W.  Caldwell 
Thomas  Jones 
Peter  W.  Johnson 
Charlie  A.  Johnson 
Edmond  B.  Lockett 
Joseph  Mastracche 
Fred  W.  Simmons 
Oliver  H.  Talhnan 
Levi  B.  Hoskins 
Edmund  C.  Kelley 

Corporals 

Elmer  J.  Fanton 
William  E.  Greer 
John  J.  Hughes 
James  E.  McMillin 
Ulysses  G.  McGually 
Robert  P.  Merrell 
Odus  B.  Russell 
Jeff  Scott  ^ 

Mechanics 

Leonard  L.  Kirk 
Walter  J.  Zenkner 


Cooks 

Ned  Crane 
Frank  Malina 

Saddler 
George  L.  Taylor 

Horseshoers 

Allen  Biby 
James  F.  Cox 
James  H.  Key 

Privates — First  Cla.ss 

James  T.  Bailey,  Jr. 
Oscar  R.  Cook 
Ray  W.  Doctor 
John  O.  Farris 
John  T.  Goben 
Benjamin  A.  Galindo 
Clifford  G.  Hogan 
James  H.  Gault 
King  W.  Montgomery 
Frank  Picha 
William  C.  Parker 
Alva  B.  Port  wood 
Frank  M.  Ravenscroft 
Robert  L.  Shields 
Clarence  H.  Warren 
Andrew  M.  Wilkinson 


Privates 

Louis  .\matucci 
Frank  A.  Bates 
Ezio  Bachini 
Thomas  I.  Brand 
Guiseppe  Bouscio 
Charles  O.  Butler 
Justo  J.  Buitron 
Newman  A.  Canty 
George  Corby 
John  T.  Corley 
Martin  Cufal 
William  D.  Corder 
Russell  U.  Davis 
Alfred  D.  Dunn 
James  H.  Dennis 
Samuel  W.  Deskin 
Joseph  T.  Damico 
Thomas  Dornan 
Enrico  Di  Pasqua 
Salvator  M.  Eulo 
William  M.  Haefer 
Lewis  E.  Hughes 
Varmer  Herber 
Fritz  H.  Hartmann 
Jesse  J.  Jenkins 
Frank  Irby 
Albert  L.  Kelley 
Robert  P.  Kane 
Joseph  Li  Pari,  Jr. 
Rudolph  A.  Lindgren 


Oscar  R.  Lundgren 
Angelo  Lemmo 
Edgar  D.  Main 
William  E.  Machen 
Charlie  Macak 
Henry  B.  Norman 
Daniel  B.  Nixon 
Sidner  L.  Orwig 
Frank  Ott 
Charles  O'NeiU 
Nealy  O.  Perry 
Albert  C.  Peterson 
John  C.  Pearson 
Jesse  B.  Pollitt 
Gust  A.  Prim 
Wesley  W.  Pirtle 
Guy  Plummer 
Walter  L.  Reeder 
Jack  Reeves 
Rufus  B.  Saine 
William  F.  Stanton 
Clarence  W.  Sanders 
Jesse  J.  Stephenson 
Albert  Schneider 
Frank  Shelto 
Noah  E.  Tucker 
John  D.  Thornton 
Martin  E.  Walsh 
Richard  Weideman 
Raymond  J.  Young 
Morris  Zaranskv 


[168] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


1st  Lieut.  Herbert  E.  Featherstone 
1st  Lieut.  S.  R.  Cunningham 
1st  Lieut.  Frank  V.  Farr 


BATTERY  "F,"  52nd  FIELD  ARTILLERY 

2nd  Lieut.  Asa  B.  Conklin 
2nd  Lieut.  Henry  W.  Griffith 
1st  Sergeant  John  R.  Lutz 


Mess  Sergeant  Alex.  Q.  Reeves 
Supply  Sergeant  Eric  E.  Brown 
Stable  Sergeant  Joseph  L.  Miller 


Sergeants 

Lee  W.  Brown 
Frank  J.  Chmelik 
John  M.  Farmer 
Gilbert  J.  Glasgow 
James  A.  Greaves 
James  R.  Hanson 
James  G.  Kyser 
James  A.  McAuley 
Norman  M.  Saunders 
Albert  L.  Seat 
John  Woelfle 

Corporals 

Harry  H.  Browning 
Oliver  H.  Hamlin 
Benj.  H.  Mallady 
John  McKee 
Domenick  Propati 
Louis  P.  Smith 
Fred  S.  Stillwell 
Claude  L.  Woodliff 
Albert  Mathis 
Edgar  D.  Markham 
Percy  S.  King 

Battery  Clerk 
Tully  Neill,  Corporal 


Cooks 
Russell  A.  Bolton 
Apostle  Manes 
Carl  A.  Self 
Hardy  A.  Stanford 
J.  E.  Woolbright 

Horseshoers 
John  F.  Jarvis 
Thure  J.  A.  Carlson 
Ed.  Martin 

Saddler 
John  D.  Scroggins 

Mechanics 
Paul  H.  McFeeters 
James  H.  Winton 

Privates — First  Class 
Louis  Apolon 
Manuel  V.  DeCosta 
Harry  H.  Dickerson 
Gustav  A.  Erickson 
Dexter  A.  Jung 
John  Lack 
Frank  Marianetti 
Lewis  H.  McClure 
Alvin  Roy  Robison 
William  G.  Galbraith 


Henry  Krause 
Clyde  M.  Lane 
Howard  Mills  Lemon 
Fred  C.  Nottelmann 
William  Radloflf 
Leo  J.  Woods 

Buglers 
Frank  J.  Borowski 
Julius  Lavine 

Privates 
Henry  P.  Bergmann 
James  M.  Blaylock 
Earl  M.  Brame 
Angelo  Capaldo 
Marcos  Crialdo 
William  B.  Gutschow 
Melvin  A.  Harris 
Edward  Henke 
Grady  W.  Heer 
Mikail  Kalabokis 
Hugh  T.  Kelly 
Harry  C.  Kight 
Albert  Kolberg 
Johnnie  W.  Lancaster 
Henry  Matranga 
James  J.  McCann 
Elton  R.  McColm 
Hubert  McGinnis 
Frank  G.  Neely 


E.  M.  Nelson 
William  A.  Okhefskie 
James  R.  Owens 
Willie  S.  Payne 
John  A.  Pfeifer 
Stanislaw  Plocharski 
Oscar  E.  Reynaud 
Clair  S.  Rike 
Charles  M.  Roberts 
WiUiam  C.  Schuldt 
Ernest  W.  Sherrill 
Joseph  F.  Slawinski 
Harvey  L.  Shull 
Walter  Smith 
Walter  S.  Starkes 
George  0.  Stoner 
John  Svetkoff 
Frederick  Thomsen 
Frank  Uptmor 
Kaisner  Urbanski 
Carl  Wagner 
Elam  P.  Wallace 
Fred  M.  Ward 
Will  V.  Webb 
Forrest  R.  Whited 
Robert  H.  Williams 
Dick  R.  Wilson 
Rufus  Woods 
Garlin  Wyrick 
Adam  Zalensky 
Chas.  F.  Zimmermann 


169] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


MEDICAL  DETACHMENT,  52nd  FIELD  ARTILLERY 
1st  Lieut.  Georee  I.  Badeaus  1st  Lieut  Charles  W.  McLain 


Sergeants 
Paul  D.  Blanlienship 
Clyde  L  Davi'i 
James  H.  Finnigan 

Privates — First  Class 
Anton  Klein 


Albert  Langlois 
George  H.  Lebouef 
Carl  F.  Reinecke 

Privates 
Abraham  DePagter 
John  L.  Finnigan 


Jewell  Furimian 
Roy  S.  Gibson 
Lewis  E.  Golsan 
Elmer  R.  Heagle 
John  T.  Kahle 
Peter  A.  Kapolos 
Frank  H.  J.  Koester 


William  B.  McCartney 
William  A  Meyer,  Jr. 
Benjamin  J.  Schmidt 
Henry  Swanson 
John  M.  Utterback 


VETERINARY  DETACHMENT,  S2nd  FIELD  ARTILLERY 
[  170  ] 


GAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


Ready  on  the  Right! 


SUPPLY  COMPANY,  86th  INFANTRY 
Continued  from  page    136 


Privates- — Continued 
Charles  E.  Anderson 
Duane  M.  Andrews 
Antonio  Angeloni 
Theodore  Balansuela 
Frank  F.  Bently 
Roy  J.  Block 
Jack  Brown 
OlUe  J.  Chandler 
Henry  P.  Chelette 
William  R.  Causey 
Windburn  C.  Cupell 
Roy  J.  Daniels 
Bert  Davis 
Earl  C.  Davis 
Felice  DeVita 
Alvin  T.  Dincans 
Tom  H.  Dossey 


Jules  Duhon 
Robert  F.  Duna\-ant 
Fritz  Eachen 
Fred  W.  Ebel 
Ed.  J.  Fechner 
Earl  Freeman 
Clarence  W.  Freeman 
William  Gamage 
James  F.  Gill 
Pinkney  Guthrie 
Grady  E.  Harrison 
Laurits  Harton 
WilUam  F.  Holland 
Charles  R.  Hurst 
Walter  F.  Ising 
George  H.  Jamison 
Helmar  Jensen 
Roy  Jones 


Miles  A.  Johns 

Walter  V.  Keating,  Ord.  Pvt. 

Alexander  M.  Lambesis 

Herbert  B.  Lynsky 

Kearby  E.  McKinley 

Leon  Miller 

Alfred  A.  Montag 

William  C.  Musser 

William  M.  Neader 

Leo  Nitti,  Ord.  Pvt. 

Bert  Olson 

Jose  Onteveres 

Farm  O'Neal 

Fritz  C.  Otterbach 

Walter  F.  Patridge 

Willie  H.  Perkins 

Victor  Pitts 

Lisbon  A.  Phillips 


Santos  Sanchez 
Paul  O.  E.  Schoenst 
Jesse  J.  Simpson 
Thomas  E.  Shackelford 
James  G.  Shea,  Ord.  Pvt. 
Rocco  Shoemaker 
John  L.  Smith 
Trueman  Sneed 
Jim  F.  Sorrell 
Arthur  Steyeart 
Peter  Syrakes 
John  L.  Thompson 
George  Uncel 
John  Vaytillo 
Ralph  P.  Wallace 
Roy  E.  Washburn 
Willie  D.  Witherspoon 
John  L.  Whitney 


SUPPLY  COMPANY,  52nd  FIELD  ARTILLERY 
Continued  from  page  163 


Wagoners — Continued 
Augusta  Wingfield 
Dewey  Lovejoy 

Privates — First  Class 
George  Carkvolos 


Edwaid  A.  Dickey 
Harry  Lesser 
John  W.  Martin 
George  Quanstrom 
Thomas  Shannon 
Felix  Karczewfki 


James  J.  Whalen 
Glenn  C.  Sutherland 

Privates 
.■\lbert  I.  Robinson 
Ralph  E  York 


Ordnance  Detachment 
Ord.  Coiporal  Elmer  S.  .Allison 

Privates 
.■\ndrew  Cullen 


Louis  Fuganti 
Peter  Gaul 
Ernest  Hein 
William  Nadolny 
Charles  H.  Marsden 
Raymond  S.  Mahlv 


171 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


FIFTY-THIRD  FIELD  ARTILLERY 

They  Were  Track  Champions  as  JVell  as  Soldiers 


IN  the  winter  of  1917-18  from  overseas  came  a  cry  for 
cavalry — cavalry  which  was  to  take  up  its  part  in  the 
great  conflict  when  the  war  of  position  was  over  and 
the  enemy  forced  into  the  open.     The  303rd  Cavalry  was 
one  of  fifteen  regiments  of  National  Army  Cavalry  which 
were  ordered  formed  in  January,   1918.     The  regiment 

began  to  take  form  about 
February  1st,  when  offi- 
cers began  to  report. 
Lieut. -Col.  C.  S.  Haight 
was  the  first  officer  to 
report,  establishing  tem- 
porary headquarters  at 
Fort  Sam  Houston,Texas. 
On  February  4th,  Col. 
Samuel  McP.  Rutherford 
reported  and  took  com- 
mand, a  week  later  re- 
moving headquarters  to 
Camp  Stanley,  Leon 
Springs,  Texas,  in  a  can- 
tonment formerly  occu- 
pied by  the  Twentieth  Field  Artillery. 

The  early  spring  will  long  be  remembered  by  all  officers 
and  the  few  enlisted  men  who  reported  from  time  to  time. 
To  train  officers,  a  provisional  troop  was  organized  and 
progressive  work  carried  on  until  the  first  increment  of 
recruits  arrived.  The  303rd  Cavalry  Band  were  among 
the  first  to  arrive,  coming  from  Camp  Bowie,  Fort  Worth, 
Texas,  where  they  were  with  the  111th  Engineers.  The 
long  hard  hours  of  work  through  the  cold  and  rainy  days 
of  February  and  March  served  to  knit  the  personnel  to- 
gether and  to  develop  an  esprit  de  corps  that  will  last  long 
after  we  leave  the  army.  Saturday,  May  4th,  will  be  long 
remembered  by  the  first  of  the  recruits.  Weather  raining; 
band  playing,  and  the  recruits  with  barrack  bags  on  their 
shoulders,  nothing  in  their  stomachs,  and  their  weight  in 
Camp  Stanley  mud  on  their  feet,  plodded  from  the  train 
and  were  divided  among  several  troops  for  the  night. 

Then  started  the  War  Department  schedule  calculated 
to  make  a  cavalryman  in  three  months  out  of  raw  material. 
This  schedule  was  strictly  adhered  to,  except  for  a  few 
necessary  modifications  due  to  the  fact  that  many  of  the 
horses  were  as  inexperienced  as  the  men.  This  called  for 
long  hours  of  horse  training  in  addition  to  the  regular 
work. 

The  hardest  days  of  intensive  training  passed  and  every- 
one started  to  enjoy  the  work.  Drills  became  a  pleasure, 
for  real  cavalry  work  began.  The  environment  of  the 
bull-ring  and  of  the  slow  trot  gradually  was  replaced  by 
the  cross-coimtry  rides,  patrolling,  and  the  other  work  that 
every  man  who  loves  the  great  out  of  doors  enjoys.  It 
was  then  that  the  water  supply  began  to  give  out,  and  it 
was  necessary  to  go  several  miles  each  morning  to  water, 
where  drill  was  carried  on  during  the  day,  and  the  return 
was  made  in  the  evening.  Thus  a  taste  of  army  life  in 
camp  was  experienced  and  in  that  the  men  developed  the 
spirit  of  self-confidence. 

Rumors  became  rife  that  all  National  Army  cavalry 
regiments  were  to  be  converted  into  field  artillery.  All 
officers  who  were  away  at  different  schools  for  cavalry 
work  were  called  in,  and  on  August  14th,  the  regiment  was 
officially  dissolved  and  formed  into  two  regiments  of  field 
artillery,  the  Fifty-second  and  Fifty-third,  as  well  as  the 
Eighteenth  Trench  Mortar  Battery.  But  though  the 
303rd  Cavalry  is  no  more,  the  days  that  were  spent  in  its 
short  existence  will  never  be  forgotten.    One  thing  only 


was  lacking  to  make  its  history  complete,  and  that  was  the 
opportunity  to  ride  into  the  face  of  enemy  fire  and  do  its 
part  on  the  fields  of  glory. 

With  the  formation  of  the  Fifty-third  Field  Artillery,  a 
new  period  of  training  began.  Under-officered  and  under- 
manned, the  different  batteries  tackled  the  problems  of 
mounted  drill  and  the  duties  of  the  cannoneer  with  the 
same  spirit  that  had  made  the  303rd  Cavalry  a  success. 
Only  five  weeks  after  its  formation  as  an  artillery  unit,  the 
Fifty-third  Field  Artillery  passed  in  its  maiden  review 
before  General  Estes.  This  review  showed  that  the  cav- 
alry training  had  not  been  wasted,  for  the  horsemanship 
of  the  regiment  was  especially  commented  upon.  About 
this  time  a  new  element  entered  the  regiment,  with  the 
arrival  of  a  number  of  officers  just  back  from  service  over- 
seas. Their  experience  with  actual  fighting  conditions 
gave  an  added  stimulus  to  the  instruction  and  the  regiment 
began  to  find  itself  as  an  organization.  On  September 
27th,  Colonel  Haight  left  for  Fort  Sill  and  was  succeeded 
by  Major  Bonham,  formerly  of  the  famous  Second  Di- 
vision, whose  Marines  his  battery  had  supported  at 
Belleau  Wood  and  Soissons.  Twelve  days  later  Major 
Bonham  was  succeeded  by  Major  Sidney  G.  Brady  of  the 
equally  famous  First  Division.  Major  Brady  gave  to  the 
regiment  its  motto  "With  all  one's  might." 

During  these  weeks  the  intensive  artillery  training  con- 
tinued, and  when  Colonel  Merril  assumed  command  on 
October  26th,  the  Fifty-third  was  well  on  its  way  to  fight- 
ing efficiency.  Colonel  Merril  combined  other  interests 
with  the  prescribed  training.  A  series  of  dances  for  the 
officers  was  begun.  The  various  batteries  celebrated 
Thanksgiving  by  dinners  and  entertainments  for  their  San 
Antonio  friends  and  the  non-commissioned  officers  gave  a 
successful  dance  at  the  Knights  of  Columbus  Hall.  An 
interest  in  athletics  was  stimulated  and  a  truly  remarkable 
record  achieved.  With  less  than  half  the  number  of  some 
of  the  infantry  regiments,  the  Fifty-third  won  the  divi- 
sional track  meet  of  October  31st  without  difficulty,  and 
on  December  4th  repeated,  capturing  43  points  out  of  a 
possible  80. 

The  signing  of  the  armistice,  first  rumored,  then  con- 
firmed on  November  11th  ended  our  high  hope  for  active 
service.  Yet  perhaps  nothing  in  the  record  of  the  regi- 
ment is  more  creditable  than  the  manner  in  which  the 
work  continued.  With  no  slackening  of  purpose  or  visible 
loss  of  enthusiasm  the  men 
of  the  regiment  faithfully 
followed  the  training  sched- 
ule, determined  to  live  up 
to  their  formed  reputation. 

A  review  of  the  history  of 
the  regiment  would  be  in- 
complete without  a  word  of 
special  tribute  to  the  en- 
listed personnel.  These 
men,  gathered  from  all 
parts  of  the  country  and 
from  all  walks  of  life,  in 
six  short  months,  despite 
distracting  features,  became 
soldiers  in  the  finest  sense 

of  the  word.  Soldiers  to-day,  civilians  to-morrow,  the 
Fifty-third  Field  Artillery  will  always  remain  the  symbol 
of  our  service  to  our  country  in  its  hour  of  trial,  and  its 
memory  is  one  we  can  cherish  as  that  of  a  service  cheerfully 
given  and  carried  forward  to  ultimate  and  complete 
success. 


172 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


COLONEL  W.  S.  WOOD  AND  STAFF,  53rd  FIELD  ARTILLERY 

Left  to  right 

Capt.  William  K.  Russell  Col.  William  S.  Wood 

Major  Edward  C.  Hanford  Major  Carlos  W.  Bonham 

Capt.  Nerval  W.  Robinson  Lieut.  George  F.  Van  Fleet 

Lieut.  John  B.  Moore 


173] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


HEADQUARTERS  COMPANY,  53rd  FIELD  ARTILLERY 


Regimental  Sergeant  Major  C.  R.  Young 
Regimental  Sergeant  Major  Leonard  L.  Anderson 
Battalion  Sergeant  Major  John  P.  Lowry 
Battalion  Sergeant  Major  Jack  H.  Lerner 


Sergeants 

Andrew  F.  Surber 
John  Bersick 
James  K.  Conner 
Clifford  T.  Easley 
Walter  L.  Geyer 
Howard  L.  Hathaway 
Lee  V.  Richardson 

Corporals 

Howell  J.  Crowson 
Von  Erwin  Davis 
Owen  Wm.  Kilday 
William  Marebdt 


William  D.  Simonton 
Doyle  F.  Specht 
Henry  H.  Wilkinson 

Cooks 
Joseph  Bertzick 
Felix  L.  Gribble 
Festus  L.  House 
Le  Roy  R.  Wood 

Horseshoer 
Frank  C.  Schulze 

Privates — First  Class 
Israel  Abare 


Asst.  Band  Leader  Edward  Brooks 
Sergeant  Bugler  F.  E.  Mills 
Band  Sergeant  John  W.  Albin 


1st  Sergeant  Harry  Shaffer 
Color  Sergeant  Harry  D.  Peary 
Color  Sergeant  John  S.  Joseph 


Stanley  Billington 
Herbert  W.  Blair 
George  Berke 
Walter  O.  Brown 
John  Caldwell 
Drury  Chaney 
Chas  E.  Crownover 
Andrew  P.  Danukos 
Ivan  B.  Dodd 
David  J.  Evans 
Jonathan  C.  Farley 
Wirt  T.  Folsom 
Harry  C.  Holland 
Otis  E.  James 
Clarence  O.  Jones 


Morris  H.  Kaliff 
Walter  W.  Looney 
Albert  Reed 
Thomas  E.  Roberts 
Emerson  D.  Thomas 
Guy  Thompson 
Calvin  A.  Ursetti 

Privates 

Orban  W.  Appleby 
Fred  H.  Bagby 
Henry  C.  Borchers 
August  F.  Brietzke 
Lester  E.  Chance 


BAND  SECTION 
Band  Sergeant  Raleigh  H.  Williams 
Band  Corporal  Sterling  L.  Youngquist 
Band  Corporal  Robert  E.  Kuykendall 


Mess  Sergeant  William  M.  M.  Koch 
Supply  Sergeant  Roy  L.  Mount 
Stable  Sergeant  James  D.  Carney 


Musicians — First  Class 
Jay  I.  Williams 
William  B.  Herrick 
Wilbur  L.  Brown 


Musicians — Second  Class 
Thomas  W.  Anderson 
Gus  C.  Edwards 
Noah  B.  Kilpatrick 


Gaston  Person 
Virgil  O.  Tucker 
Musicians — Third  Class 
Chas.  M.  Corder 


Theodore  Dinklage 
Byron  B.  Fields 
William  J.  Fry 
Max  L.  Grout 
Claude  L.  Hill 
Ira  W.  Hipp 
John  M.  Hoffman 
John  William  Hubble 
John  Oscar  Lane 
George  W.  Martin 
Lloyd  McReynolds 
Grady  W.  Moore 
Ellis  T.  Naifeh 
Rex  Ridgeway 
Neal  Robertson 


Arthur  M.  Sears 
J.  C.  Schler 
James  M.  Simms 
Steve  Skrla 
Ehner  C.  Smith 
James  B.  Taylor 
James  A.  Thornton 
Barto  H.  Uzzell 
Sam  W.  Van  Horn 
James  J.  Walsh 
Samuel  J.  Webb 
Hugh  White 
Badger  C.  Williams 
Stanley  Winchester 
Henry  S.  Worthy 


Corporal  Bugler  Simon  P.  Home  . 
Corporal  Bugler  Stanley  Pirogowicz 


Jack  B.  Hayslip 
Herbert  C.  Lempke 
Leonard  D.  Parrish 
Paul  J.  Real 


Gerald  P.  ScuUy 
Roscoe  S.  Woods 
Harry  Yates 


174 


CAMP    TRAVIS    AND    THE    WORLD    WAR 


1st  Lieut.  George  F.  Van  Fleet 
2d  Lieut.  Ernest  W.  Grimball 
Mess  Sergeant  John  C.  Godfrey 


SUPPLY  COMPANY,  53rd  FIELD  ARTILLERY 

1st  Lieut  Ralph  L.  Scott 

Regimental  Supply  Seigeant  Thomas  G.  Hubbard 

Stable  Sergeant  Alfred  L.  Wilson 


2d  Lieut  Allen  D.  Cloke 
First  Sergeant  William  Kayser 
Supply  Seigeant  Reno  Antonuccio 


Sergeants 
William  J.  Conway 
Edward  A.  Gallagher 

Corporals 
Frank  E.  Cuske 
William  T.  Hutchings 
Frank  F.  Bacon 

Cooks 
Harry  C.  Antle 
Woog  A.  Sudduth 

Horseshoers 
Mat.  Hodak 


Edward  J.  McGraw 
Richard  J.  Taaffe 

Mechanics 
David  A.  Peterson 
Jim.  O.  Turvan 

Saddler 
Anton  J.  Ihle 

Wagoners 
Will  H.  Ballard 
James  Blaha 
Howard  J.  Brigant 
William  A.  Chapman 
John  E.  Dando 


Reginald  W.  Davies 
Arthur  C.  Ford 
Lester  Kautz 
Frank  Klunk 
Harvey  Lagow 
John  Lamb 
Melvin  Loftis 
Henry  G.  Payne 
George  Smith 
Jame;  M  Staton 
Farris  C.  Stewart 
Edward  Walker 
George  Watson 
Charles  M.  Whitley 
Andrew  Yorger 
John  A.  Zerwer 


Stanley  Zilewicz 

Private — Fiist  Class 
Samuel  F.  Sebastian 

Privates 
Juan  Anzaldua 
Clarence  W.  Boyce 
Henry  M.  Bums 
Budge  Chastain 
John  Harris 
Thomas  Silas  Kelley 
Raymond  Schoelm 
John  F.  Stasaitis 
Joe  Szedeli 
William  Fitzgerald  Wagnon 


1175] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


BATTERY  "A,"  53rd  FIELD  ARTILLERY 


1st  Lieut.  Rogers  T.  Moore 
1st  Lieut.  John  B.  Jones 
1st  Lieut.  Maylon  E.  Scott 
2nd  Lieut.  Willard  H.  Curtis 


2nd  Lieut.  William  F.  Fisher 
2nd  Lieut.  George  N.  Isherwood 
2nd  Lieut.  Richard  S.  Vreeland 
2nd  Lieut.  Harry  R.  Thompson 


First  Sergeant  Henry  L.  Umlauf 
Mess  Sergeant  Carl  A.  Thompson 
Supply  Sergeant  John  M.  Pickett 
Stable  Sergeant  Adolph  Thoraae 


Sergeants 

Frank  A.  Case 
George  S.  Jones 
Robert  W.  Seipel 
Sib  S.  Brewer 
Fred  G.  Gay 
Clarence  H.  Harris 
Leo  Weidenfeller 
John  H.  Stuart,  Jr. 
Thomas  Aguirre 
Trinidad  San  Miguel; 
Gilmer  R.  Mauldin 
Elbert  O.  Ramsey 


Corporals 

Adams  S.  Davis 
Conroy  Wilder 
Emory  V.  Hawcock 
Winfield  W.  Meyer 
Albert  Elmer 
Edwin  E.  Regnell 
Dotie  H.  Townsend 
Milton  Kallen 
Colvin  T.  Sexton 
Joe  J.  JoUey 
James  B.  Huff.  Jr. 


Jr. 


Joseph  C.  Stahl 
Harry  Meginnis 
Carl  Hanson 
Archie  N.  Lance 
Fred  H.  Lindquist 
Desmond  F.  Rash 
John  E.  Richbourg 
Ernest  E.  McBride 
Jerry  R.  Stoops 
Harry  E.  Kadrisky 
Everett  C.  Matthews 

Chief  Mechanic 
Martin  F.  Alexander 


Cooks 

Edwin  E.  Quisenberry 
Peter  A.  Johnson 
Ben  Meissner 
John  H.  Kahler 

Horseshoers 

Irwin  Gibson 
Bruce  Larson 
August  R.  Gruhlke 


Buglers 


Charley  Jordan 
William  Gloza 

Mechanic 
Joe  East 
Privates — First  Class 

Ludwig  A.  Blumstengal 
Frank  C.  Right 
Walter  Bachmann 
John  F.  Bellair 
Andrew  Gurzynski 
John  Jabczynski 
Oscar  W.  Jack 
Dario  A.  Hernandez 
Homer  Jordan 
Clarence  W.  Leedom 
Charlie  F.  Lofton 
John  E.  Logue 
Archie  L.  Lopeman 
Simeon  L.  Mahannah 
Martin  F.  Meehan 
Burrell  I.  Sheppard 
John  J.  Totzke 
CUfford  H.  Slife 
Joseph  Steffen 
Joseph  Wanninger 


Privates 

George  B.  Adams 
Ernest  L.  Brown 
Martin  Bruce 
Samuel  M.  Bonner 
Domenico  Castellano 
Arthur  Bugler 
Thomas  Connor 
Thomas  F.  Donlon 
George  Gaddis 
John  Gora 
Thomas  R.  Gray 
Stanley  Grendowitz 
John  J.  Grzadzinski 
Isom  F.  Jones 
Juan  De  Dios  Mares 
William  Kosis 
Julian  McCollum 
Herbert  Rainey 
Anton  Riva 
Glen  E.  Roth 
Morris  A.  Rutledge 
Walter  Schultz 
Governor  H.  Shaw 
Frank  S.  Smith 
Leopold  Steiner 
Markucz  Lukas 


m^immr-i.    _    ^-> 


[176] 


CAMP    TRAVIS    AND    THE    WORLD    WAR 


BATTERY  "B,"  53rd  FIELD  ARTILLERY 

Captain  James  Sipolski 


1st  Lieut.  William  C.  O'Keefe 
1st  Lieut.  William  M.  Vanderwaal 
2nd  Lieut.  Frederick  S.  Cooper 

1st  Sergt.  Robert  A.  W.  Mattiiias      Supply  Sergeant  Charles  A.  Geiger 


2nd  Lieut.  Ruch  E.  Evans  2nd  Lieut 

2nd  Lieut.  William  T.  Clow  2nd  Lieut. 

2nd  Lieut.  Harry  J.  Kluss  2nd  Lieut. 

Stable  Sergeant  Frank  piuch 


Sergeants 

Everett  L.  Evans 
Oscar  F.  Battles 
William  H.  Hart 
Walter  D.  Forrest 
Herman  Hartman 
Emmett  M.  Osborne 
George  M.  Haden 
Elmore  H.  Russell 
Miles  J.  Early 
David  McCoard 

Corporals 

Archie  J.  Delahunty 
Edmund  A.  Barrett 
George  Curotto 
James  Steen 
Frank  J.  Brown 
George  O.  Hendri.x 
.\nthony  Walsh 
Walton  I.  Patterson 
Helmer  Carlson 
William  H.  GriiTith 


Jesse  T.  Henry 
William  H.  Magness 

Cooks 
James  Granacuris 
Robert  S.  Nelson 
Powderly  F.  Middleton 
Leonard  R.  Bartnek 
Ruby  S.  McWilliams 

Horseshoers 
Arakal  DerBoghosian 
Jackson  Nobletubby 
Melvin  E.  Darling 
Joseph  E.  Blubaugh 

Privates — First  Class 
Salvator  Bendatt 
WUliam  F.  Budka 
William  C.  Capps 
Robert  W.  Colston 
Lewis  Estes 
George  L.  Gibson 
Andrew  J.  Hoffman 
Lester  R.  Johnson 


Maurice  Johnson 
Ernest  L.  Lambert 
Rube  Lester 
Howard  F.  Morse 
Shelby  Perkins 
Fred  Seely 
Theodore  Schuit 
Elbert  H.  WilHams 
Roy  E.  Boslet 
Andy  A.  Brown 
James  E.  Buhler 
Rudolph  J.  Brueggman 
Jesse  H  Casper 
James  F.  Costello 
Herbert  A.  Devol 
James  W.  Devine 
Thomas  T.  Ehner 
Henry  A.  Engels 
Ben  R.  Germany 
Joseph  F.  Harrigan 
Olin  Hendricks 
Elmer  S.  Hesh 
Wiley  Hilburn 
Stanley  C.  Hokanson 


Paul  V.  McPherson 
Crowell  E.  Pease 
Philip  P.  Werlein 

Mess  Sergeant  Guy  H.  Turner 

Britt  Irick 
David  E.  Kennedy 
Rudolph  G.  Krause 
John  J.  Kunza 
Frederick  Y.  Larkin 
Lonnie  Loper 
Herbert  Miller 
Thomas  I.  Minze 
Raymond  Morris 
John  K.  Nagell 
Carl  W.  Oesterle 
William  Poll 
Teodozy  Porcunski 
Mendal  Z.  Rachman 
William  Russell 
Ben  E.  Simeroth 
William  Streich 
Arturo  Uresti 
Lawson  C.  Ussery 
John  Van  Geffen 
Cecil  C.  Vines 
Joseph  T.  Visgilio 
Arthur  Volberding 
Albert  D.  Woodall 


1771 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


BATTERY  "C,"  53rd  FIELD  ARTILLERY 


Captain  Lawrence  J.  Baldwin 
1st  Lieut.  William  T.  Delihant 
2nd  Lieut.  Carl  H.  Bauer 
2nd  Lieut.  F.  A.  Cooper 


2nd  Lieut.  Gordon  E.  Merrill 
2nd  Lieut.  John  J.  Condon 
2nd  Lieut.  Clarence  W.  O'Connor 
2nd  Lieut.  William  M.  Knowles 


2nd  Lieut.  Eugene  Sims 

1st  Sergeant  Horace  Thompson 

Stable  Sergeant  Clarence  F.  Neuendorf 

Mess  Sergeant  James  B.  Defibaugh 


Sergeants 
Arnold  G.  Griffin 
Henrj'  Clay  Brookman 
Donald  L.  Dowd 
Frank  J.  Hanak 
Harley  A.  Norris 
William  C.  Nye 
Earby  A.  Rogers 
George  E.  Rollins 
Jim  B.  Salyer 
Schepers 
Charles  H.  Smedley 

Corporals 
Harold  W.  Carver 
Sylvester  Cirricione 
Buford  Glenn  Davis 
Emory  V.  Ewing 
Harry  Kershner 
James  G.  Love 
Henry  W.  Moore 
James  H.  Sammons 
George  W.  Cassell 

Horseshoers 
George  V.  Vamer 
Bert  W.  Parker 
.  Harry  U.  Kerley 


Buglers 
Louis  P.  Martell 
Harry  W.  Mason 

Saddler 
Barney  McNac 

Cooks 
Wellington  B.  Kline 
Henr>'  Stephens 
William  R.  Zimmerman 

Mechanic 
Milton  A.  Dykes 

Privates — First  Class 
Or\-aU  R.  BedweU 
Theodore  Berman 
William  Bums 
James  Chiamopoulos 
Gunard  S.  Danielson 
Edward  \.  Dougherty 
John  J.  Harrington 
Luther  .\mos  Hatfield 
Walter  A.  Lund 
Ignatius  Malak 
Edmond  W.  Robinson 
Ma.x  F.  W.  Schultz 


W'alter  Schultz 
Joseph  Schwind,  Jr. 
Herbert  A.  Wenerd 

Privates 
Pete  .\lberty 
Carl  R.  Anderson 
Harry  A.  Anderson 
Joseph  R.  Armstrong 
James  A.  .\skew 
Sequoyah  Baldridge 
Loyal  I.  Boyd 
John  E.  Barder,  Jr. 
Harry  T.  Boj-nton 
Walter  L.  Brown 
Fred  Brubaker 
Kimsey  Coffman 
George  .A.  Dennis 
Ernest  G.  Dickinson 
Delbert  O.  Dye 
Loved  E.  Farley 
John  Fedock 
Waiiam  T.  Files 
Rudolph  J.  Fritscher 
Raymond  T.   Glackin   (Detached 

service) 
John  Glazauskis 
Thomas  A.  Glenn 


Alphonse  Gugenberger 
John  J.  Hunt 
Joseph  Huntz 
William  Johnson 
William  J.  Jolly 
Frank  J.  Kauss 
Wedter  J.  Latham 
Ralph  A.  Lee 
Frazier  Lewis 
John  J.  Lovet 
Gust  Lindmark 
John  R.  Madderom 
Everett  \'.  Neese 
Richard  Ozment,  Jr. 
Philip  Panunzio 
Theodore  F.  Pauley 
Charles  S.  Peiser 
Emmitt  Powdrill 
.\llen  J.  Quishenberry 
Clyde  \'.  Rooker 
Omer  Russell 
Henrj-  Schroeder 
Samuel  O.  Shoemake 
Henrv  J.  Treece 
Albert  W.  Van  Winkle 
Oscar  Wear 
Floyd  E.  Wiess 
Otis  A.  Woodrome 


[178] 


CAMP    TRAVIS    AND    THE     WORLD    WAR 


BATTERY  "D,"  ,'>3icl  11  ELD  ARTILLERY 


Captain  George  H.  Timmins 

1st  Lieut.  Howell  Van  Nostrand 
2nd  Lieut.  Russell  A.  Compton 

1st  Sergeant  Robert  T.  L.  Patterson 
Supply  Sergeant  Fred  E.  Elmore 


2nd  Lieut.  .Arthur  .\.  Dailey 
2nd  Lieut.  William  D.  Dalton 


Sergeants 
William  L.  Pond 
Henry  C.  Black 
Thomas  F.  Vines 
Lindsey  E.  Kinney 
Felix  C.  Cline 
Larkin  D.  Manning 
Jim  Webb 

Eugene  Phillip  Theis 
Harry  L.  Kreischer 

Corporals 
Charles  Lawter 
Hardy  Rauch 
Robert  L.  Womack 
Archie  L.  Jones 
Charles  L.  Boy 
Joe  Lopez 
Martin  R.  Cavazos 
Allen  Bassett  Davis 
Joe  Hafner 
Frank  Maldonado 
Henry  S.  McLaren 
Milton  H.  Moore 

Cooks 
Harry  Reynolds 
Earl  L.  Beiard 


Horseshoers 

Rex  Bayless 
Harry  L.  Stierwalt 

Saddler 
Elmer  Ward 

Mechanic 
Jesse  C.  Stewart 

Buglers 

Louis  Bradac 
Lewis  Stabeno 

Privates — Fiist  Class 

Edward  A.  AUard 
Albert  E.  Anderson 
Harvey  Bernier 
Archie  B.  Calder 
Harry  Eggers 
Michael  Finkelstein 
Tami  Ragusa 
George  E.  Froman 
Harry  B.  Gibson 
Walter  H.  Gibson 


2nd  Lieut.  Reuben  E.  Gray 
2nd  Lieut.  Marshall  E.  Cole 


2nd  Lieut.  Maston  H.  Pruett 
2nd  Lieut.  Louis  H.  Strock 


Stable  Sergeant  Jackson  W.  L.  Moody 
Mess  Sergeant  William  Hugh  Counts 


Ross  H.  Miller 
John  Monroe 
Walter  A.  Roung 
Max  Styrk 
Anton  Zylan 

Privates 

Charlie  Franklin  Anderson 

Robert  Louis  .\nderson 

Alex.  Alexander 

Paul  .Altemus 

Jim  Bob 

Daniel  G.  Braman 

William  Ivey  Colbert 

Henry  Eugene  Dowling 

Peter  Elipani 

Tony  Falco 

Mike  Farrell 

Paul  Ficht 

Otto  Garren 

Beppo  I.  Gengerello 

Harvey  L.  Gerard 

Peter  Gibson 

Petross  Gremen 

Everett  Goodin 

Bert  Grafton 

Roby  Grisby 


Ferdinand  Hanz 
Harvey  Hayes 
George  Hoolie  Horn 
Robert  Oliver  Bennet 
William  J.  Jarrett 
Clarence  Robert  Knapton 
Frank  Lubojacky 
Sim  M.  Lancaster 
Dulin  Lynn 
Thomas  E.  Mahan 
Charlie  Mayton 
Charles  McGovern 
Earl  E.  McKay 
Guiseppi  Nectoli 
Luther  O'Connor 
Antonio  Paninello 
Mario  Perozzolo 
Joseph  Pouliot 
Willie  Mack  Risinger 
Tom  Randleas 
Delbert  Sanders 
Andrew  Elbert  Seward 
Phillip  Leslie  Smith 
William  L.  Taylor 
Arnold  Waller 
Franklin  E.  Wilson 
George  Altus  Sterling 


V.  t^; 


1179] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


Captain  Benton  G.  Shoemaker 
2nd  Lieut.  William  E.  Coleman 
•  2nd  Lieut.  John  E  Groenert 


.BATTERY  "E,"  o.3rd  FIELD  ARTILLERY 

1st  Lieut.  Robert  W.  Vail 
2nd  Lieut.  Harry  S.  Cutler 
2nd  Lieut.  Guy  Morrow 


1st  Lieut.  John  B.  Moore 

2nd  Lieut.  Hal  Daniel 

2nd  Lieut.  Franklin  G.  Armstrong 


Sergeant — First  Class 
Arthur  Zahn 

Supply  Sergeant 
William  E.  O'Byrne 

Mess  Sergeant 
James  E.  Walker 

Stable  Sergeant 
Lonnie  H.  Stutts 

Sergeants 
Paul  Povlovsky 
Joseph  E.  Grammier 
WiUiam  S.  Dix 
William  G.  Colton 
Shaler  S.  Davis 
Charles  A.  Hogan 
John  R.  McEntvre 
Steele  A.  Wright 
Erven  A.  Gra'iam 

Corporals 
Henry  J.  Pasche 
WiUard  E.  Clarke 
Joseph  L.  Cleary 
James  B.  Thornton 
Eugene  K.  Herrick 
Arthur  L.  Gants 
Thomas  F.  Ashley 
Charles  E.  Hightower 


Dewey  L.  Johnson 
Dick  Sheridan 
John  O.  Hornbeak 
John  W.  Warren 
Frank  A.  Anderson 
Clyde  Parker 
John  M.  Price 
Mark  Bamett 

Cooks 
James  Kenzal 
Joseph  M.  Provenzano 
Roy  S.  Wiginton 
Frank  B.  Wilson 

Horseshoers 
Ulysses  R.  Pugh 
Peter  L.  Rozzell 

Mechanics' 
Rammie  A.  Smith 
Oscar  E.  Zenkner 

Saddler 
Earl  Green 
Bugler 
Wine  A.  Sharpe 

Privates — First  Class 
William  Bergmann 
Mark  W.  Crosby 


Cecil  L.  Denton 
James  M.  Eager 
Eliseo  F.  Flores 
Ollie  F.  Flynn 
Ernest  R.  Glancey 
John  F.  Hall 
Edgar  R.  Hooper 
Claude  K.  Howe 
Sam  Ma.xwell 
Frank  J.  Monahan 
James  L.  Pate 
James  Petty 
Christopher  C.  Pool 
Walter  G.  Simpson 
Martin  L.  Sowle 
Roy  A.  Todd 

Privates 

Frank  Baker 
Huda  J.  Bamburg 
Ed  L.  Bourland 
Frank  L.  Broaddus 
George  H.  Carlson 
F.  L.  Chambers 
Marvin  R.  E.  Choate 
Andiew  S.  Coconaugher 
George  C.  Conklin 
WiQie  J.  David 
Will  O.  Davis 
Ray  F.  DeFrain 


Jack  A.  Duchamp 
Joseph  R.  Duval 
Petrie  Elverson 
Dewey  H.  Franklin 
Frank  B.  Gallagher 
Douglas  Graves 
Odis  Guidry 
Nelse  J.  Hass 
Jess  Hemdon 
John  C.  HoUoway 
Theodore  Kuhnau 
Charles  E.  Lowery 
Umila  Lunaro 
Barnes  H.  McLaughlin 
Herman  H.  Nehrkorn 
Melvin  L.  Packard 
Henry  Patterson 
John  B.  Qualey 
Christopher  Ross 
John  Ryan 
Henry  Schade 
Richard  Shine 
Anthony  J.  Slick 
Tony  Szwajkowski 
Claude  Turner 
Earl  F.  Taylor 
Carl  Van  Kanegom 
Herbert  D.  Webster 
Arthur  S.  Weiss 
Sebe  M.  Wilson 


[180] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


1st  Lieut.  Roger  A.  Cook 
1st  Lieut.  Francis  M.  H.  Dazey 
2nd  Lieut.  Franklin  G.  Davidson 
2nd  Lieut.  Richard  W.  Griswold 


BATTERY  "F,"  53rd  FIELD  ARTILLERY 

2nd  Lieut.  Raymond  W.  Cobb 
2nd  Lieut.  Tliomas  J.  Elliott 
2nd  Lieut.  Joseph  M.  Wells 
2nd  Lieut.  James  L.  Moore 
2nd  Lieut.  William  J.  McDonald 


1st  Sergeant  Harry  Denny 
Supply  Sergeant  Robert  W.  Bast 
Mess  Sergeant  Joseph  C.  Glaviana 
Stable  Sergeant  Louis  Feuer 


Sergeants 

Claude  V.  V.  Forster 
Vernon  R.  Shaw 
Walter  J.  Mumme 
John  C.  Copeland 
Warren  R.  Whitehead 
John  DePratti 
James  M.  Dye 
Berkley  Gregg 
Harry  Forester 
John  Lynch 
Mart  Simmons 

Corporals 

Alexander  Alp 
Charles  E.  Smith 
Abner  C.  McAfee 
Chalres  Regini 
Edward  E.  BeU 
Abel  DeHaan 
Clyde  A.  Curless 
Ben  A.  Howell 
Herman  H.  Miller 
James  Tah-Kofper 
Roy  D.  Cassity 


Cooks 

George  Vallas 
Antonio  R.  Forestello 

Horseshoers 

Alva  B.  Hall 
Lindsey  C.  Owsley 
Frank  S.  Youree 

Saddler 

Lamar  George 

Mechanics 

Henry  Schorder,  Jr. 
Russell  C.  Glaser 
Fred  E.  Brown 

Bugler 

Goivann  Brocoli 

Privates — First  Class 

Luther  Beck 
James  L.  Brown 
Charles  O.  Clark 
Lee  R.  Clavton 
William  T.'Coltman 


Stash  Cone 
Lloyd  L.  Curtis 
Frank  G.  Fisher 
Robert  A.  Hart 
Anton  B.  Heiner 
Charles  A.  Lewis,  Jr. 
August  Mitas 
Peter  C.  Nyborg 
Leon  Podgorski 

Privates 

Durrell  B.  Baldwin 
John  B  artels 
Carl  F.  Bauer 
James  E.  Boone 
Albert  T.  Caddick 
Lee  E.  Castle 
James  H.  Carpendale 
Herbert  L.  Clark 
Karl  J.  Clore 
Robert  L.  Connell 
Franklin  P.  Cox 
Tom  R.  Cushman 
Chester  Daley 
Roy  E.  Dixon 
Joe  J.  Drozd 
Milton  H.  Franks 


Tom  T.  Gay 
Wallace  M.  Gilchrist 
Gunnar  P.  Gudmundson 
Henry  W.  Henderson 
Robert  V.  Holt 
Stanley  Jablonski 
Luther  L.  E.  Johnson 
James  T.  Johnson 
Thomas  B.  Jones 
.Albert  A.  Kaminski 
Walter  R.  Keller 
James  J.  Kelley 
Johan  A.  Lindgren 
William  F.  Loftice 
Ignac  Matczak 
Henry  A.  McAfee 
Taylor  E.  McNabb 
Mickle  Medgie 
John  J.  Moll 
William  H.  Morris 
Matthew  A.  Myers 
Harold  M.  Phelps 
John  Poniedzielski 
Peter  Skrebutenas 
Louis  Stellman 
Benjamin  S.  Weinberg 
Anton  Zilinskas 


mm 

[181] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


MEDIC.\L    DETACHMENT.   53rd    FIELD   ARTILLERY 


1st  Lieut.  Ralph  E.  Murrell 

Sergeant 
James  T.  Smith 

Privates — First  Class 
Willie  G.  Bort 
James  R.  Leamon 
.\lbert  P.  Lee 
Robert  S.  McXaughton 


Captain  Xorval  W.  Robinson 
1st  Lieut.  Edward  D.  James 

Herman  J.  Neumann 
Wesley  W.  Richards 
Hugh  L.  Roberts 

Privates 
Gustave  .\uch 
William  Beckley 
Adolph  GardeU 


1st  Sergeant  Joseph  E.  Spelich 

Gustave  Hansen 
Harry  Musker 
Erwin  E.  Ohlendorf 
Nathan  .\.  Slayton 
Harlan  M.  Sloane 
James  -\.  Truelock 
Leo  J.  Beister 
Clavbome  S.  Clark 


VETERINARY   DETACHMENT,  o3rd   FIELD    ARTILLERY 


1st  Lieut.  James  R.  Renfrew 
1st  Lieut.  Guy  G.  Stevens 


Farrier  Floyd  Dickson 
Farrier  John  Lucus 


Farrier  Harold  L.  Trew 

1st  Class  Private  Roscoe  Payne 


[182] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


Gold  Brick  Hank 


THE  "GOLD  BRICK"  STAFl- 
Name 


Duty  in  Division 


1.  Major  General Regtl.  Sgt.  Major  L.  D.  Bower Division  Commander. 

2.  Brigadier  General Color  Sgt.  Fred  HoUiday Comdg.  AWOL  Brigade. 

3.  Colonel Sergeant  Calvin  N.  Noble Chief  of  Staff. 

4.  Lt.  Colonel Color  Sgt.  Dan  M  Shannon Asst.  Chief  of  Staff,  GB-L 

5.  Major Sergeant  B.  F.  Pool Asst.  Chief  of  Staff,  GB-2. 

6.  Lt.  Colonel Supply  Sgt.  Mark  J.  Gregory Division  Quartermaster. 

7.  Lt.  Colonel 1st  Sergeant  Walter  Adkins Division  Inspector. 

8.  Major Coiporal  Oliver  L.  Ely Division  Judge  Advocate. 

9.  Lt.  Colonel Sergeant  Geo.  W.  Frels Division  Adjutant. 

10.  Major Sergeant  H.  C.  Van  Hise Asst.  Division  Adjutant. 

11.  Captain Regtl.  Sgt.  Maj.  Frank  A.  Brown Division  Personnel  Adjutant. 

12.  1st  Lieutenant Bn.  Sgt.  Major  T.  E.  Griffith .Aide. 

13.  1st  Lieutenant Bn.  Sgt.  Major  G.  E.  Johnson Aide. 


THE  "GOLD  BRICK"  DIVISION 


THIS  organization,  known  as  "The  Gold  Brick  Divi- 
sion," with  the  mythical  rank  of  its  various  mem- 
bers, was  formed  in  the  Headquarters  Company, 
Fifty-second  Field  Artillery,  in  the  following  manner: 

Upon  the  cessation  of  hostilities  there  was  naturally  a 
great  deal  of  disappointment  on  the  part  of  the  members 
of  the  Headquarters  Company,  because  of  the  fact  that 
they  were  denied  the  opportunity  to  show  their  mettle 
on  the  firing  line  in  France,  and  it  was  found  that  certain 
members  soon  lost  considerable  interest  in  their  work, 
and  lapsed  into  that  old  army  habit  of  passing  the  buck. 
In  the  army,  passing  the  buck  is  such  a  universal  prac- 
tice that  a  man  must  be  exceptionally  clever  to  be  able 
to  get  away  with  it,  but  there  were  certain  non-commis- 
sioned officers  in  the  company  who  seemed  to  be  exceed- 
ingly proficient  in  the  art,  and  when  a  man  becomes  an 
artist  along  these  lines  he  is  henceforth  known  in  army 
parlance  as  a  gold  brick.  This  group  of  gold  bricks  caused 
much  discussion  in  the  company,  and  many  arguments 
were  had  as  to  who  was  the  greatest  gold  brick  in  the 
regiment,  and  finally,  after  much  heated  discussion  on  the 
subject,  it  was  unanimously  conceded  that  without  a 
doubt,  considering  all  the  circumstances,  conditions  and 


the  past  records  of  the  men,  Regimental  Sergeant  Major 
Bower  took  the  prize,  and  if  a  man  ranked  according  to 
his  ability  to  gold  brick  he  certainly  would  rank  as  a 
major-general. 

Sergeant  Major  Bower  was  notified  of  this  decision  and 
immediately  assumed  the  rank  that  was  so  unceremoni- 
ously thrust  upon  him.  He  not  only  assumed  the  rank, 
but  seemed  to  glory  in  it,  and  formed  for  himself  a  staff, 
giving  each  man  a  mythical  rank  and  basing  his  appoint- 
ments upon  the  general  ability  of  the  various  men  to  gold 
brick  or  pass  the  buck.  Thus  was  an  organization  of 
thirteen  members  formed  which  was  thereafter  known  as 
"The  Gold  Brick  Division"  because  of  the  high  rank  that 
had  been  thrust  upon  the  various  members  of  the  group 
by  their  associates.  There  is  no  doubt  that  if  the  truth 
were  known  quite  a  large  organization  of  gold  bricks  could 
have  been  formed,  not  only  in  the  Fifty-second  Field 
Artillery,  but  in  other  units  as  well,  but  these  gold  bricks 
seemed  to  be  very  exclusive,  and  while  there  were  many 
men  who  gold  bricked  very  consistently  before  and  after 
the  formation  of  this  small  unit,  the  charter  members 
thereof  would  not  even  deign  to  take  notice  of  their  pro- 
pensities, and  the  ranks  were  never- recruit^.  -     - 


183 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


FIFTY- FOURTH  FIELD  ARTILLERY 

A  Jack-of-All  Regiment  is  This  Outfit 


IF  there  Is  one  regiment  which  can  do  everything  and  do 
more  than  a  little  bit  in  each,  it  is  the  Jack-of-all 
regiment,  the  Fifty-fourth  Field  Artillery  (motorized). 
For  the  Fifty-fourth  started  out  as  an  aggregation  of 
cavalrj'  troops;  presto-changed  into  light  artillery  and 
then  proceeded  to  metamorphose  itself  into  a  motorized 

artillery  regiment. 

It  was  a  long  jump 
from  its  original  form  as 
the  304th  Cavalry  which 
was  mobilized  at  Camp 
Stanley  in  April,  1918, 
to  its  present  formation 
as  a  horseless  organiza- 
tion, but  the  jump  was 
made  and  the  men  con- 
tributed their  modicum 
to  the  history  of  Camp 
Travis  after  a  fashion 
which  has  long  since 
ceased  to  be  opera  bouffe 
and  has  become  every- 
thing that  should  attract  the  admiration  of  the  true  soldier. 
Men  of  the  National  Army  from  New  York  and  Illinois 
comp)Osed  the  304th  Cavalry,  which  was  one  of  the  first 
cavalry  regiments  organized  from  draft  men.  It  was 
formed  at  Camp  Stanley,  Texas,  and  the  officers  assembled 
in  April.  After  a  month's  specialized  training  under  Col. 
Lincoln  Andrews,  later  apjx)inted  brigadier-general  and 
sent  overseas,  and  Lieut.  Col.  Fitzhugh  Lee,  the  officers 
were  ready  to  impart  the  same  thorough  instruction  to 
their  men.  The  first  body  of  men  to  arrive  was  the  regi- 
mental band  which  was  taken  intact  from  the  Fifth  Illinois 
Cavalry  at  Camp  Logan.  It  was  commanded  by  Band 
Leader  Alan  Deege,  who  was  later  commissioned  a  second 
lieutenant  and  remained  as  the  band  conductor.  The 
other  companies  from  the  New  York  and  Illinois  draft 
regiments  arrived  during  April  and  the  early  part  of  May 
while  the  regiment  was  carrying  on  its  period  of  intensive 
training.  Continuing  this  work  on  the  boots  and  saddles 
schedule  the  cavalrymen  were  fit  and  ready  for  overseas 
service  by  August. 

Then  came  the  first  rift  in  the  lute.  An  order  came  to 
convert  the  regiment  into  field  artillery.  Half  of  its 
strength  were  to  be  sent  to  the  Forty-third  Field  Artillery 
at  Camp  Stanley,  and  the  other  half  turned  over  to  the 
Fifty-fourth  Field  Artillery  which  was  to  be  organized  at 
Camp  Travis  in  August.  The  last  review  of  the  304th 
as  a  cavalry  regiment  was  held  and  presented  one  of  the 
most  remarkable  pictures  that  could  be  obtained  from 
green  men,  mostly  city-bred,  and  equally  green  horses, 
many  of  which  had  scarcely  known  a  saddle  imtil  broken 
by  the  troop)ers.  Intensive  training  of  the  men  and  ani- 
mals had  obtained  noteworthy  results.  The  regiment 
formed  for  review  at  a  full  gallop,  and  not  a  nose  went 


ahead  of  the  imaginary  line  made  by  the  horses  in  the 
process  of  formation.  Both  men  and  officers  had  attained 
two  qualities  necessary — intensive  training  and  thorough 
discipline. 

But  fate,  it  would  seem,  was  a  peculiar  trickster  against 
this  regiment.  Half  of  it  was  to  become  the  nucleus  of  a 
motorized  regiment.  So  with  the  coming  of  the  fall 
months,  half  of  the  e.xtinct  304th  Cavalry  found  itself  in 
Camp  Travis  without  horses  and  so  far  as  instruction  was 
concerned,  ready  to  do  the  about  face.  It  was  a  matter  of 
forgetting  boots,  saddles  and  spurs  and  getting  down  to 
thinking  in  terms  of  mils,  angles,  motors,  carburetors  and 
standing  gun  drills,  but  here  again  it  was  demonstrated 
that  once  a  soldier  always  a  soldier  and  once  a  good 
regiment  always  a  good  regiment. 

With  a  sigh  as  he  heroically  placed  behind  him  the  mem- 
ories of  dangerous  hurdles,  and  mad  rides  over  the  fields 
of  Camp  Stanley  and  impressive  mounted  formations,  each 
officer  and  man  went  to  his  respective  school  to  learn  to 
be  an  artilleryman.  The  results  attained  before  and  after 
the  armistice  was  signed  have  proven  that  these  men 
accepted  and  capitalized  the  new  condition  with  the 
fortitude  of  a  real  soldier. 

An  ideal  organization  reflects  the  efiiciency  and  knowl- 
edge of  its  commanding  ofiScer.  This  is  quite  true  of 
Col.  Edward  P.  Orton  who  took  command  of  304th 
Cavalry  when  Col.  Andrews  was  relieved.  He  brought 
the  same  principles  of  instruction  and  discipline  with  him 
to  the  Fifty-fourth  Field  Artillery,  and  it  is  a  known  fact 
that  his  personality  can  be  seen  in  every  effort  made  by  the 
regiment.  Colonel  Orton  has  had  a  long  and  distinguished 
record  as  a  soldier.  He  was  born  at  Washington,  Arkan- 
sas, and  appointed  to  the  U.  S.  Military  Academy  from 
that  state,  graduating  with 
the  class  of  1896. 

Colonel  Orton  has  served 
in  Cuba,  the  Philippine  and 
Hawaiian  Islands.  From 
1906  to  1910  he  was  detailed 
in  the  Pay  Department.  At 
the  outbreak  of  the  present 
war  he  was  detailed  in  the 
Quartermaster  Department 
and  was  made  dejwt  quar- 
termaster. Port  of  Em- 
barkation, Newport  News, 
Virginia,  which  depot  he  or- 
ganized; he  was  relieved  in 
May,  1918  as  depot  quar- 
termaster. Port  of  Embarkation,  Newport  News,  Virginia, 
and  assigned  to  command  of  the  304th  Cavalry,  National 
Army.  Colonel  Orton  is  a  graduate  of  the  Army  School 
of  the  Line,  Fort  Leavenworth,  Kansas;  the  Cavalry  and 
Artillery  School,  Fort  Riley,  Kansas,  and  the  Field  Artil- 
lery School,  Fort  Sill,  Oklahoma. 


[184] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


LIEUT.-COL.   RUTLEDGE  AND  STAFF,  54th  FIELD   ARTILLERY 

Left  to  right  (Officers) 
Lieut.  Alvin  R.  Dallmeyer  Lieut.-Col.  Robert  C.  Rutledge 

Major  Franklin  L.  Miller  Major  Frederick  W.  Wurster 

Lieut.  Gerald  P.  Clute 


185] 


CAMP    TRA\IS     AND    THE     WORLD     WAR 


HEADQUARTERS    COMPANY,  54th  FIELD   ARTILLERY 


1st  Lieut.  Roy  G.  Booker 
2nd  Lieut.  James  H.  Carll 
2nd  Lieut.  William  L.  Pierce 
2nd  Lieut.  Adrian  G.  Wynkoop 
2nd  Lieut.  Oscar  Dahl 
2nd  Lieut.  AJvin  R.  Dallmeyer 


2nd  Lieut.  Alan  Deege 

2nd  Lieut.  C.  W.  Koerner 

2nd  Lieut.  Gerald  P.  Clute 

Regimental  Sergeant  Major  Joseph  P.  Haley 

Regimental  Sergeant  Major  William  L.  Hunter 

Battalion  Sergeant  Major  Emmett  M.  St.  Clair 


Color  Sergeant  Wilfred  Dufour 
1st  Sergeant  Martin  J.  Revello 
Sergeant  Bugler  Howard  M.  Steed 
Band  Sergeant  Graydon  C.  Lower 
Supply  Sergeant  William  V.  Landwer 
Stable  Sergeant  Mack  Lorenz 


Sergeants 
Robert  F.  McKinley 
James  H.  Smith 
Claude  I.  Warlick 
Herbert  Sams 
Lionel  D.  Riker 
Leslie  L.  Morris 
Carl  Fahnstrom 
Harvey  Z.  Nourse 
Albert  Goldensun 

Band  Corporals 
Clarence  Blankenburg 
Maurice  G.  Dickson 
Nicholas  L.  Musolino 

Corporals 
Jay  W.  Green 
Hardy  H.  Lassetter 


Leo  M.  Adams 
Herbert  N.  Olsen 

Cooks 
Nova  F.  Smith 
Christ  J.  Sterious 

Wagoners 
Edgar  P.  Arnold 
Charles  B.  Huls 
Homer  O.  Jackson 

Mechanics    . 
William  E.  McKinley 
Hjalmer  Nelson 

Musicians — First  Class 
Peter  Giorio 
Frank  Grippaudo 


Musicians — Second  Class 
Francis  C.  Fletcher 
George  C.  Ringler 
James  M.  Vincent 

Musician — Third  Class 
John  H.  Pearce 

Buglers 
Fred  L.  Middleton 
William  F.  Nix 

Private — First  Class 
Albert  C.  Wroblesky 

Privates 
William  D.  .Alexander 
Lindsev  C.  Ballard 


August  Bartel 
Bezzie  L.  Blaylock 
Sam  Brucato 
Fred  L.  Buckles 
Will  H.  Clair 
Charles  K.  Cohn 
E.  L.  Collingsworth 
Ernest  B.  Coplen 
M.  L.  Dayton 
Anton  Dvorak 
Frank  Fojtik 
Ed.  L.  Hagerty 
Owen  P.  Hale 
Clyde  iL  Hanna 
Albert  F.  Heindel 
-Arthur  P.  Hudgins 
George  Huether 
Clayton  M.  Johnson 
Carroll  E.  Justus 


Joseph  T.  Keane 
Charlie  A.  Knudson 
Oscar  C.  Lancaster 
Raymond  LeGrasse 
Walter  McAnear 
Charlie  L.  McCain 
Richard  E.  MiUs 
Kirtland  G.  Parks 
Oscar  Parker 
Albert  Partridge 
Frank  L.  Robinson 
Leslie  W.  Royall 
Walter  M.  Shands 
Peter  J.  Strother 
Samuel  J.  Slick 
Mark  Sloves 
Romeo  G.  St.  Germain 
Edward  P.  Taheny 
Roy  G.  Turner 


186 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


SUPPLY   COMPANY,  54th   FIELD   ARTILLERY 


2nd  Lieut.  Harry  F.  Cooper 
2nd  Lieut.  Guy  R.  Coc 
2nd  Lieut.  Murray  Russell 


Captain  Wakeman  Hackett 
Regimental  Supply  Sergeant  Joseph  Abrams 
Regimental  Supply  Sergeant  Lloyd  D.  Stevenson 


Sergeants 

Otto  R.  Krueger 
George  Appley 

Corporals 

Paul  J.  Fishel 
Fletcher  A.  Haynes 
William  J.  Heffron 
James  F.  Peterson 
Edmond  J.  Poncin 

Blacksmith 
Charles  McKee 

Saddler 
Thomas  D.  Spell 

Cooks 

John  E.  Hartley 
Howard  M.  Knowles 


Charles  Y.  Jones 
Jeff  Sudduth 

Wagoners 
Russell  .Mexander 
John  D.  Bodine 
Cecil  E.  Bond 
Jess  Bradshaw 
Phil  F.  Brequx 
George  Carlton 
Charles  Crotty 
Chandler  Edwards 
Otto  R.  Faedtka 
Andrew  J.  Garvey 
Michael  Geraghty 
James  Jones 
Walter  Lewis 
Daniel  Nashan 
Miroslav  Pencik 
Lorenzo  Sevey 
Walter  Schild 
George  W.  Stelle 
Lawrence  D.  Styron 
George  Winistorfer 


Privates — First  Class 

Augustine  J.  Botterman 
William  Degnan 
Frank  Rincione 


Privates 

Charley  M.  Burruss 
Albert  M.  Cocke 
Arthur  H.  Chamblee 
Dillard  D.  Dobbins 
Thomas  J.  Dockins 
Felix  Dynowski 
Thomas  L.  Eddleman 
Ray  J.  Fleece 
James  A.  Gearhart 
John  S.  Hunter 
Grover  C.  Jackson 
Thomas  Jacob 
John  Jennings 
Oswald  Klepp 
Lucien  J.  Legendre 
Charles  D.  Leper 


Regimental  Supply  Sergeant  Robert  L.  Livesay 

1st  Sergeant  John  Mas  Luckinbill 


Sol.  Lewis 
Dick  Lewis 
William  E.  Moore 
James  B.  Mustain 
James  Nicols 
Clifford  Newell 
Joseph  C.  Padgett 
Robert  W.  Parry 
Homer  F.  Petrea 
William  R.  Pirtle 
Thomas  J.  Quinlan 
Lee  D.  Reed 
Earnest  E.  Sanford 
Walter  F.  Schlack 
Clarence  T.  Stites 
Burton  Stumphorn 
Morma  E.  Thompson 
John  J.  Tipperrietcr 
Tom  Tramel 
Glen  W.  Tuttle 
Edward  Weber 
Herman  Wiebke 
Loyal  T.  West 
William  E.  Wright 


Ordnance  Department 

Ordnance  Sergeant 
Leroy  E.  Taylor 

Sergeants 
Charles  B.  Moore 
Richard  Terpening 
Robert  Corbin 

Corporals 
Robert  W.  Behringer 
Stanley  W.  Cochrane 

Privates 
Thomas  J.  Dunn 
Francis  J.  Foley 
John  J.  Fey 
Elbert  E.  Harris 
William  J.  Hickman 
Adrian  Johanns 
Carl  H.  Johnson 
Harvey  P.  Miller 
Edward  McGrath 
Joseph  H.  Parr 
Victor  J.  Walter 


187 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


BATTERY  "A,"  54th  FIELD  ARTILLERY 


2nd  Lieut.  Edward  N.  Wiggin 
2nd  Lieut.  Scott  A.  Dahlquist 


2nd  Lieut.  Edwin  D.  Cooke 
2nd  Lieut.  Winthrop  I.  Collins 


2nd  Lieut.  Raymond  P.  Flynn 
1st  Sergeant  Alexander  Stock 


Supply  Sergeant  Fred  L.  Magoon 


Sergeants 

Stanley  G.  Rupich 
Reuben  Kelly 
Zed  W.  Willett 
Earl  C.  Moore 
Joseph  B.  Scanlon 
Andrew  Johansen 
John  W.  Hargrave 
Walter  H.  Pendleton 
Roy  Clements 

Corporals 

Bemie  F.  Parkhurst 
Byrl  G.  Milner 
Zemie  R.  Brenaman 
William  B.  Buchmiller 
Michael  J.  Dougherty 
Noah  I.  Gillespie 
Arthur  J.  PuUen 
Richard  F.  Wilson 
Joseph  N.  DeLong 
Charles  F.  Carlton 


Edwin  R.  Riemer 
Cash  V.  Emery 
Milton  L.  Williams 
Joseph  H.  Holmes 
Omar  Cunningham 
Ernest  G.  Futterhecker 
Thomas  W.  Stousland 

Cooks 
Presly  T.  Hutchinson 
Earl  G.  Teal 

Buglers 
Adam  Samanek 
Milton  S.  Brown 

Saddler 
John  C.  Malone 

Privates — First  Class 
William  B.  Murphy 
Victor  H.  Nuckolls 
Edward  H.  Re>-nolds 
Roy  F.  Sandberg 


George  L.  Wittman 
Archie  F.  Guthrie 
George  W.  Carle 
Michael  Rocca 
William  E.  Gamble 
James  J.  Keefe 
Lenn  D.  McCrory 
John  F.  Szweda 
George  E.  Walker 

Privates 
George  B.  Arledge 
Edward  M.  Bell 
William  A.  Borowski 
Emil  C.  Bourgois 
George  W.  Brown 
Thomas  B.  Calvin 
Harry  A.  Campbell 
Ernest  E.  Caskey 
Lee  Cobbs 
John  M.  Crow 
Guy  Davis 
Leroy  DeCamp 


Dave  T.  Dickson 
Riley  E.  Dowell 
Roy  B.  Elam 
DeWitt  Finney 
Otto  H.  Fromm 
Arthur  A.  Fuhrman 
John  L.  Gee 
William  H.  George 
Steve  Haggis 
Halmer  Hansen 
Fied  J.  Hilgart 
John  Hopkins 
Ernest  R.  Johnson 
J.  R.  Jones 
Frank  S.  Kidwell 
George  C.  Lee 
ComeUus  W.  Maloney 
Pete  H.  Mathis 
Amos  Mattern 
Albert  H.  Meggenburg 
William  A.  Mick 
WilUam  Miller 
Henry  Minx 


Robert  W.  Mitchell 
Clarence  Nichols 
Walter  H.  Pearson 
Leonard  C.  Peterman 
Tulio  Ricko 
Elmer  D.  Robertson 
George  Schulz 
John  Shaip 
James  E.  Snyder 
John  J.  Spitznagel 
William  C.  Stanfield 
Charles  C.  Steiger 
James  R.  Sullivan 
Eugene  Szwajkart 
Dowzer  E.  Taylor 
John  W.  Thomas 
Porter  Thompson 
John  Thornton 
Johnie  W.  Tyler 
Marion  Westfall 
Lawrence  Williams 
Albert  Woerner 


^itii^ 


stj: 


[188] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


BATTER V  "B,"  o4th  FIELD  ARTILLERY 


Captain  Charles  D.  VoUers 


Captain  Benjamin  R.  Brindley 


1st  Lieut.  John  J.  Quail 

2nd  Lieut.  John  C.  Davis 

2nd  Lieut.  WiUiam  G.  McCurdy 


Sergeants 

Arthur  G.  Chapman 
Albert  Glignor 
Gilbert  B.  Goff 
Laurence  A.  Harris 
Leonard  J.  Higgins 
Anthony  Kapczynski 
James  F.  Perry 
Ernest  B.  Smith 
Carl  Williams 

Corporals 
Floyd  M.  Bctts 
George  L.  Blagg 
Leon  D.  Bond 
Philip  P.  Casey 
Charles  Fortgang 
George  G.  Greshavv 
Harry  B.  Hoffman 


Richard  P.  Kalter 
John  B.  Moon 
Clark  H.  Parkhurst 
James  W.  Phillips 
Emil  B.  Schiller 
Ross  E.  Shoop 
Dale  D.  Stephens 
Bert  J  Waltermire 
Novus  H.  Weaver 
Orval  C.  Whipple 

Saddler 
Milford  S.  Reynolds 

Mechanic 
Cornelious  G.  Penner 

Wagoners 
Edgar  V.  Anderson 


1st  Lieut.  Edward  R.  Whittingham 
2nd  Lieut.  Henry  C.  Davidson 
2nd  Lieut.  Andrew  E.  Conover 
2nd  Lieut.  Paul  McE.  Washington 


Jesse  M.  Olds 
Marshall  A.  Olson 

Cooks 

Robert  L.  Douglas 
Jase  Plaster 
William  M.  Sanders 
Walter  M.  Sisco 

Buglers 

Fay  J.  Leonard 
Tandy  Sanford 

Privates — First  Class 

Grady  W.  Conner 
Nels  T.  Ekstrom 
Clyde  Mitchell 
Harris  Staton 


Golie  C.  Stockton 
Virgle  Weddle 
Oscar  D.  Williams 

Privates 

Ernest  W.  Bell 
Earl  J.  Bentler 
William  Bottoms 
Reynolds  Brigance 
Benjamin  W.  Cecil 
Christ  Christensen 
Phillip  J.  Christoffel 
Kelly  B.  Cope 
Warner  J.;Davenport 
Roy  Emerson 
Walter  L.  Felke 
Estel  S.  Fondren 
Emanuel  R.  Freitag 
Edward  F.  Friese 


1st  Sergeant  David  M.  Keehn 
Supply  Sergeant  Harry  P.  Herzog 
Mess  Sergeant  William  H.  Reynolds 


Ernest  T.  Gamble 
Ripley  B.  Harwood 
Arthur  C.  Hohmann 
Alfred  Holmgren.  Jr. 
Ervin  T.  Kier 
Louis  Kotz 
Anton  T.  Kutac 
Joseph  H.  LaFrance 
Peter  Langas 
Herman  Lange 
Joseph  S.  MacHenry 
Carl  Martin 
Nante  A.  L.  Martin 
Alessandro  Molini 
Raymond  W.  Moore 
Jefferson  D.  Morgan 
Maiion  L.  Morrison 
Charles  B.  Orr 
Joseph  W.  Peebles 


Lee  A.  Powell 
Bernard  E.  Pyka 
William  C.  Reid 
Ed.  C.  Revard 
Roy  A.  Richardson 
Frank  R.  Richmond 
George  D.  Roberts 
Homer  T.  Sallis 
•Charles  Sanderson 
Isaac  Sawidan 
Rudolph  Schaffer 
William  E.  Standard 
Arthur  0.  Steffan 
.\ntonio  Sunzeri 
Richard  Swanson 
Carey  Turner 
James  S.  Vancura 
John  E.  Woods 


189 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


Ist  Lieut.  Floyd  F.  Eldred 
1st  Lieut.  Ross  L.  Milliman 

1st  Sergeant  Thomas  K.  Shaw 


BATTERY  "C."  54th  FIELD  ARTILLERY 

Captain  Hartwell  H.  Linney 

2nd  Lieut.  Hallock  P.  Long 
2nd  Lieut,  .\lfred  E.  DaWs 


Sergeants 

Homer  Carter 
Honore  Comelis 
Henr>-  J.  Dexheimer 
James  A.  Hays 
John  B.  Hooper 
John  W.  Liverman 
James  \.  MajTiard 
Odie  McCuUom 
Victor  G.  Salinas 
Luther  G.  Turner      * 
Edson  B.  Wolverton 

Corporals 

Maurice  C.  Booth 
Charles  Brack 
Earl  L.  Deshazo 
Emanuel  Halpert 
John  P.  Hume 
Henr>-  H.  Hvatt 


Arthur  R.  Jones 
Frank  Krabsbach 
Frank  H.  Storm 
William  E.  Stobaugh 
Alfred  E.  Graham 
James  H.  Vaughan 

Cooks 
Hiram  C.  McClain 
Paul  W.  Schur 
Rov  L.  Stedman 
William  N.  Smith 

Buglers 
Edward  B.  Conway 
FeUx  F.  Waite 
Reuben  J.  Wilkinson 

Privates — First  Class 
Joseph  A.  Deruse 
Leo  S.  ilarceau 
Robert  C.  Motley 
Charles  E.  Sterling 


Supply  Sergeant  Edward  P.  Smith 
Privates 

Andrew  Bacchi 
Fagan  A.  Bates 
Gustave  H.  Baumgardt 
Claud  Beeson 
.Arthur  M.  Berg 
Otis  L.  Bohall 
Charles  J.  Bretz 
.Allen  L.  Brewer 
Gustav  G.  Buesing 
Ercole  Conti 
Fred  L.  Cosier 
John  D.  Collins 
Arthur  .A.  Da\-is 
.A.  Davis 

Benjamin  J.  Davis 
Harr>-  Davidson 
Amie  S.  Flatness 
Charles  A.  Fifield 
LeeRoy  Ford 


2nd  Lieut.  Thomas  V.  Stark 
2nd  Lieut.  Raymond  Kerr 

Mess  Sergeant  Troy  W.  Adams 


John  C.  Frantzen 
Lee  P.  Gall 
Ralph  D.  Gillogly 
Ernest  M.  Goddard 
Festus  A.  Haag 
MeUan  .A.  Hand 
Oscar  W.  Hubbard 
Bunch  Hill 
Harry  A.  Jenrich 
Knudt  F.  Johannsen 
.Adolph  Kalgarden 
Joseph  Kitto 
George  O.  Kvalvog 
John  Leverenz 
Philip  Locks 
Palmer  E.  Linn 
Arbie  J.  Maxfield 
Walter  D.  Meek 
Edward  F.  Miles 
Ian  C.  Mclntyre 
Xute  Paschal 


Emmitt  R.  Pryor 
Joseph  Rizzo 
William  C.  Roberts 
Thomas  Salisbury 
Fred  W.  Sellen 
Eugene  T.  Sewell 
Otto  M.  Shupe 
Lacie  V.  Shelton 
Herbert  Slaughter 
Arvid  C.  Soderling 
Floyd  F.  Stevenson 
William  E.  Swinford 
Tine  Tidwell 
Nelson  C.  Torpey 
Elbert  Traylor 
William  D.  Tyree 
Joe  VeUno 
Ed.  D.  Via 
.Arnold  B.  Walton 
Harry  R.  Weber 
Earl  Wimberly 


'  ^  - 


190 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


BATTERY  "D,"  54th  FIELD  ARTILLERY 


Captain  Scott  P.  Hart  Captain 

1st  Lieut.  William  V.  Philips  2nd  Lieut.  Joseph  K.  Felker 

2nd  Lieut.  Alva  A.  Brumfield  2nd  Lieut.  Oliver  C.  Cobb 

2nd  Lieut.  John  A.  Nolan  2nd  Lieut.  William  L.  Sutton 


Sergeants 
Goal  TuUous 
Burr  W.  Sharp 
Thomas  H.  Murphy 
Alvin  E.  Bronstad 
W'illiam  E.  Woods 
Norman  L.  Stewart 
Edward  Lehman 
Jacob  Blasdel 
Eli  J.  Covington 
James  W.  McCann 

Corporals 
James  K.  Beauchamp 
Bennie  Brown 
Herbert  W.  Lang 
Henry  Ness 
William  L.  Chisholm 
Cornelius  J.  Mara 
Richard  E.  Rohrback 
Joseph  Glantz 
Harvey  Allen 
George  Cumpton 


Chauncey  A.  Itschner 
Bruce  M.  Thomas 
Oscar  W.  Vogel 
Mechanic 
Joseph  P.  Howe 

Saddler 
Charles  W.  Johnson 

Cooks 
Frank  Smith 
Jesse  B.  Ivey 
Adolph  Rommel 

Privates — First  Class 
Charlie  T.  Amick 
Embrey  Daniel 
William  F.  Fennema 
Joseph  E.  Jarvis 
Huglf  T.  Johnson 
John  W.  Marsh 
Thad  M.  Shelton 
George  W.  Schuster 
Roland  O.  Sweetman 


Harry  W.  Sebring 
Robert  O.  Waldron 
Anton  F.  Cieszynski 
Christopher  W.  Wiese 

Privates 
Giordano  Baldassin 
Leo  S.  Bass 
Michael  Bellwich 
Andrew  C.  Boyd 
Frederick  R.  Carley 
Vernie  Clark 
Frank  Coleman 
Fred  E.  Coleman 
George  T.  Cormier 
Arthur  J.  Cramer 
Edmund  E.  Cowan 
Steve  Debrowske 
Richard  B.  DeMunbreun 
Remo  Di  Zefalo 
Joseph  E.  Frith 
Russell  E.  Ferrell 
William  P.  Foster 


Guy  L.  Badger 

1st  Sergeant  Jack  H.  Powell 
Mess  Sergeant  Charles  G.  Hilse 
Supply  Sergeant  Mose  J.  Harris 


William  Gallagher 
Joseph  M.  Green 
Aubrey  L.  Gleason 
Jesse  L.  Grantom 
Anton  E.  Grube 
Floyd  H.  Hamacher 
Robert  L.  Hart 
Charles  Hartmann 
Thomas  E.  Hay 
George  W.  Hickey 
Peter  Hoars 
Wesley  F.  Holland 
George  W.  Hornby 
Arthur  C.  Hubbard 
Alex.  W.  Hunt 
Joseph  A.  Jean 
Bryan  E.  Jordan 
Mathias  H.  Kirbach 
Elmer  L.  Mears 
Andrew  L.  McMillan 
W'illiam  B.  Moss 
William  L.  Mullen 


Fred  T.  Norman 
Stewart  Nystrom 
Francis  O'Connor 
Frank  Pokomik 
Garry  W.  Putnam 
Stinnis  Reynolds 
Fred  C.  Reese 
Richard  C.  Rupp 
William  Schueler 
Hugh  Simpson 
Bernard  St.  Clair 
Isaac  P.  Thomas 
Paul  Thomas 
Tom  R.  Vaughan 
Robert  N.  Wagner 
Adolf  H.  W'alter 
Stephen  Walters 
Arthur  P.  Waxier 
Albert  J.  Watkins 
Fred  Wenneberg 
Louis  Witkowsky 
Henry  G.  Yarbrough 


191 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


BATTERY  "E,"  54th  FIELD  ARTILLERY 

Captain  A.  Dwight  Williams 

1st  Lieut.  Alonzo  C.  Scurlock  1st  Lieut.  LystOD  G.  Snyder  2nd  Lieut.  Ray  T.  Roberts  2nd  Lieut.  Archibald  S.  Teller 

2nd  Lieut.  Walter  R.  Nichol  2nd  Lieut.  Alfred  J.  Cone  2nd  Lieut.  Chester  P.  Collins 


First  Sergeant  Robert  A.  Tropp 
Supply  Sergeant  Ernest  C.  Nagel 
Mess  Sergeant  Virgle  M.  Williams 

Sergeants 
Daniel  Heam 
John  R.  Henderson 
Richard  R.  Jentzsch 
James  C.  Porter 
Edwin  S.  Righeimer 
Earl  E.  Selvidge 
Nuss  Stevenson 
Joseph  F.  Terrell 
William  Williams 
Michael  Pershyn 

Corporals 
Luther  H.  Buchanan 
Arnold  P.  Baker 
Elza  F.  Adams 
Andrew  Balla 
Jeremiah  Baddell 
Thomas  J.  Brown 
Fred  J.  Bruggemeyer 
Ambrose  J.  Carolan 
Houston  Edmonds 


George  A.  Hoefle 
James  B  Looby 
Robert  Lorrb 
\irgil  T.  O'ConneU 
Thomas  J.  Patterson 
Maurice  H.  Ptterman 
George  Richards 
Herman  F.  Seefelt 
George  Sheyahshe 

Cooks 
James  W.  Austin 
Thomas  O.  Dyer 
Frank  Drechsler,  Jr 
George  J.  Ditewig 

Privates — First  Class 
Manley  O.  Anderson 
Lawrence  Boulton 
Tony  Broeringmeyer 
Edgar  R  Canavan 
Robert  G.  Carr 
J''sse  M.  Cassell 
Geoige  W.  Condo 
Perry  Copp 
Benjamin  Cornell 
WilUam  Dasenbrock 
Hairy  C.  Donaldson 


Albert  Doles 
Earl  Frailey 
Addison  W.  Fullwood 
Aloysius  Garvy 
Frank  S.  Harrell 
Frank  KeUy 
Edward  M.  Kilu 
Thomas  Kulick 
Edward  J.  Laurendeau 
Edwin  J  LindquLst 
Charles  Loneman 
Peter  C.  Neilson 
Carl  Olsen 
Roley  Sands 
William  H.  Sheehan 
WiUiam  H.  Sheets 
John  S.  ToUett 
John  W.  Wolfe 
Lawrence  A.  Wolfe 

Privates 
Jess  R.  Andrews 
Charles  P  Bartlett 
Joel  B.  Bledsoe 
Anton  F.  Brdecka 
E^rl  C.  Brooks 
Ralph  Brumleve 
Emory  B.  Cain 
James  R  Cannaday 


William  C.  Condon 
Walter  C.  Cooper 
Omer  P.  Dumas 
David  B.  Elledge 
Arthur  Englekirg 
Edward  R  Fiauenfelder 
Dave  Frazier 
John  Grencer 
Hobait  W.  Hamilton 
Robert  Hinchey 
Amos  L.  Jones 
Louis  Knabe 
WiUis  O.  Medford 
John  J.  JIcMahon 
Thurman  O.  Mock 
Robert  Moore 
-Alfred  Nail 
Henry  F.  Peters 
Eddy  Peterson 
Albert  C.  Revels 
Edmond  Schranz 
William  C.  Schulte 
Fred  Stepan 
-Arthur  E.  Steullett 
Fred  N.  Tidrick 
John  Toenjes 
Willie  Woods 
WiU  Valdes 
Chester  W.  Zettwoct 


[192] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


BATTERY  "F,"  5ith  FIELD  ARTILLERY 


1st  Lieut.  Culver  C.  Bragg 
2d  Lieut.  Walter  L.  Goldston 
2d  Lieut.  John  B.  Chilton 
2d  Lieut,  jfohn  S.  N.  Davis,  Jr. 


Sergeants 
Joseph  M.  Wagner 
Felipe  Garcia 
Fay  D.  Allison 
H.  Malcolm  McCarty 
Benton  R.  Starkey 
Charles  R.  Brown 
Eugene  F.  Rooney 
John  P.  McLure 
William  P.  Buzan 

Corporals 
Claude  C.  Abercrombie 
Walter  D.  Edwards 
Walter  L.  McCarroU 
Clarence  M.  Utley 
Earl  F.  Stice 
Arthur  P.  Parrott 
Anthony  O.  Miller 
Luke  L.  Robinson 
Frank  C.  Murray 
Henry  Moreau 


Elza  H.  Parks 
Rudolf  R.  Kuehn 
Edward  J.  Eggum 
Victor  E.  Norman 
Henry  C.  Thorpe 

Saddler 
Julius  W.  Harris 

Cooks 
Abby  L.  Bain 
Joseph  E.  Forsyth 
Arthur  J.  HoUinsworth 
John  H.  Hendricks 

Mechanic 
Lynn  L.  Wilson 

Privates — First  Class 
Philip  D.  Barnes 
Joseph  A.  Cannon 
Ralph  Davis 
John  De  Boer 


1st  Lieut.  Archibald  W.  Fisher 
2d  Lieut.  Thomas  P.  Clyde 
2d  Lieut.  William  T.  Lowrey 
2d  Lieut.  Paul  F.  Jervis 
2d  Lieut.  Roy  A.  Welday 

Paul  Groh 
Percy  Hinebaugh 
Albert  Nett 
Charlie  P.  Williamson 

Privates 
William  F.  Auston 
Harry  L.  Burns 
Erwin  Buchholz 
Robert  C.  Bowles 
Anton  J.  Bordovsky 
Sam  W.  Cowan 
Bennie  H.  CoUeps 
Albert  G.  Cash 
Gustave  A.  Carlsten 
Claes  V.  H.  Claeson 
John  D.  Curfman 
Hyman  Dolinsky 
Ralph  J.  Davis 
Fred  A.  Engel 
Evert  C.  Frost 
Willie  E.  Fambrough 


1st  Sergeant  Ralph  S.  Hinman 
Mess  Sergeant  Charlie  R.  Heller 
Supply  Sergeant  George  M.  Barr 
Stable  Sergeant  Sam  M.  Hyden 


Marion  Franceschi 
Jack  Greenspoon 
Frank  N.  Gillock 
William  A.  Hutcheson 
Ellis  Honeycutt 
Arthur  J.  Harris 
Tack  Hodgson 
Louis  Harrison 
William  J.  Hof 
Hubert  H.  Henger 
Fred  Hasty 
Eric  O.  Henderson 
Harold  Jones 
Emanuel  Kastenbaum 
Edward  M.  Kuykendall 
Frank  Kasik 
Joseph  Kwiatkowski 
Frank  J.  Landolt 
Gust  A.  Lindgren 
Carl  Loord 
Archie  L.  McClennan 
Bailey  W.  Moore 


Clyde  Murphy 
Frank  J.  Marwig 
Isadore  Meltz 
Fritz  G.  Nelson 
Otto  W.  Nicklas 
Adolph  Pfeiffer 
Herbert  G.  Pearson 
Arthur  L.  Pagliaro 
Adolph  F.  Palm 
HoUey  H.  Stout 
Clyde  Slay 
Rudolph  Truhlar 
John  G.  Tackett 
Carl  M.  Thorp 
Hugo  H.  Theis 
Richard  Triptow 
Fred  Teneyck 
William  G.  Tranel 
William  J.  Weir 
James  V.  Weaver 
Bucaro  Biagio 
Adolph  L.  Convert 


J  ^  ^     ^r-r 


193 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


MEDICAL  DETACHMENT,  54th  FIELD  ARTILLERY 


1st  Lieut.  Charles  F.  Lyle,  M.C. 

Sergeant — First  Class 
John  C.  Sycamore 

Sergeants 
Clarence  H.  Rushton 
John  C.  Winfree 

Privates — First  Class 
Christian  A.  Christensen 
Dudley  R.  Holloman 
Henrj-H.  Litke 
Joseph  W.  Maresh 
Alvin  P.  Noves 
Walter  R.  Schilling 
August  Schinkofski 
Walter  S.  Stanford 
Horace  B.  Stone 
Emil  O.  Webber 


1st  Lieut.  Ernest  W.  Nitscbe,  M.C. 

Privates 

Earl  W.  Bailey 
John  C.  Binder 
Herman  Dillavou 
Charles  Ekdahl 
Van  Hause 
William  F.  Kreklow 
Peter  J.  Lappen 
Robert  A.  Mattuschek 
William  F.  McNamara 
Luther  W.  Miller 
Joseph  V  O'Rourke 
Aloysius  Scharenbrock 
Irvin  E.  Simpson 
George  E.  Sisco 
Paul  J.  Stahl 
Jesse  E.  Waddell 
Alvin  C.  Watson 


194 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORI.  D  WAR 


COMPANY  "D,"  35th  INFANTRY 


Privates — Continued 
Marion  Germain 
Rocco  Giordano 
Jose  De  La  Luz  Guillen 
Albert  J.  Harper 
Grant  M.  Hays 
Ernest  H.  Heim 
Harry  J.  Heppner 
Conrad  H.L.C.  Hildebrandt 
Henry  0.  Hiliger 


Ovid  Hurt 
Carl  R.  Johnson 
Let  A.  Johnson 
John  F.  Ladner 
Anton  O.  Langenfcld 
Ernest  I-ixke 
Michael  McGuigan 
Severin  S.  Melling 
Mike  Music b 
Fred  Neff 


Continued  from  page 

John  O.  T.  Nelson 
William  NickofI 
Evan  Olsen 
ThorvaUl  Opdale 
Robert  Rangartz 
John  D.  Reece 
William  V.  Reder 
Sherman  H.  Rose 
Charles  L.  Schulz 
Matthew  J.  Schelski 


ISg 


John  E.  Severson 
William  Shore 
Leo  Simonis 
John  L   Simpson 
Frederick  Thieme 
Charles  Thomas 
Joseph  Twarn 
John  Warren 
Jacob  Weber 
Herman  G.  Wendjer 


Raymond  Wieczorek 
Edmund  B.  William 
Dan  Woods 
Raymond  Woods 
George  G.  Wright 
Robert  B.  Crawford 
Thomas  F.  Farris 
George  L.  Harris 
Raymond  Jackson 
Ira  M.  Whitney 


COMPANY  "E,"  35th  INFANTRY 


Privates — First  Class — 
Continued 

Henry  T.  Cornelius 
Earnest  Cox 
Fred  Creel 
Michal  Danilovitch 
Harry  Dapron 
Johnathan  O.  Jenkins 
John  Kicul 
John  Kitzhoffer 
Joseph  Krowczyk 
Paul  Kurczak 
Clay  E.  Lewis 
John  Moskal 
Martin  A.  Naleway 
WiUard  E.  Potter 
Edmund  Rakstel 
Vincent  Richter 


Joseph  Rober 
Stanley  Russ 
Alex.  Satkowski 
Roy  Sayers 
Martin  Shoptaw 
Stanley  Smolinski 
Joseph  Stanczuk 
Isadore  Steinberg 
Robert  W.  Swan 
Lee  R.  Turner 
Charles  E.  Williams 

Privates 
Baptiste  Allies 
Rasmus  R.  Anderson 
Walter  Baker 
Thomas  A.  Barler 
Ralph  Barone 


Continued  from  page  l^S 

Fredrick  Beckman 
Charles  O.  Beverly 
Bolen  T,  Branscomb 
Edward  Brockman 
Benjamin  R.  Brummitl 
Tony  Carvallo 
John  G.  Crawford 
Melby  M.  Curtis 
Charles  A.  Deloy 
Watsoti  Dickerson 
Paul  A.  J.  Frega 
Edwart  Garbolino 
Frank  C.  Glotfelty 
Jan  Greenwold 
Fred  H.  Grewe 
Paul  C.  Grischow 
Harry  B.  Hams 
Earl  V.  Haskins 


i-'.dward  Hasse 
koy  Hickman 
Henry  Hitzman 
(Jeorge  Huber 
Edgar  A.  Irion 
Tomas  Jones 
Charles  H.  Klein 
Louis  K.  Klose 
August  Kruckeberg 
John  A.  Kufeldt 
Henry  F.  Leverenz 
William  O.  Lueth 
William  A.  Lycan 
John  McCafTerty 
Uominico  Madrid 
Dick  Marcus 
Herbert  F.  Marshall 
Maria  I.  Martinez 


Horace  Mathes 
\\  illiam  Moellenk.amp 
William  J.  Niebur 
Robert  Noble 
lOarl  Olscn 
John  M.  Persano 
Henry  Peterson 
Fredrick  T.  Schaefer 
Charles  J .  Schelski 
Alma  Smith 
Alexander  Stasulaitis 
Boleck  Stecensky 
Oliver  P.  Swiger 
Emil  Urhausen 
Clyde  Williams 
Louis  H.  Zaehler 
Pete  Zaras 
Henry  Zimbleman 
Frank  Maddox 


COMPANY  "I,"  35th  INFANTRY 


Buglers — Continued 
Mac  M.  McLaughlin 

Privates — First  Class 
John  J.  Bieniek 
John  Brigando 
William  Daniel 
Leo  J.  Farley 
William  A.  Flanagan 
Max  Gitlitz 
Paul  Goddard 
William  J.  Kerzek 
John  Krosinski 
John  Labrizzi 
Bolestaw  Latek 
James  Liewald 
Joe  Meceunas 
John  B.  McMillan 
WilUam  J.  O'Reilly 
Glenn  V.  Parker 


Victor  N.  Plauger 
Frank  B.  Rys 
Harry  E.  Schneider 
George  \'.  Soloman 
Louis  J.  Terrian 
SUas  T.  Wright 
Paul  W.  Zinn 

Privates 
John  Aibukoy 
Niculaie  Andros 
Erwin  N.  Allen 
Jesse  T.  Beer 
Olaf  R.  Berglund 
Peter  R.  Berlow 
Milan  Bijelich 
Hugh  W.  Binns 
Harry  J.  Brown 
George  Bruss 
Winfred  J.  Carter 


Continued  from  page  J27 

Valdemar  Christensen 
Willis  Clemmer 
John  H.  Cullen 
Arthur  D.  Davis 
George  J.  B.  Dow 
Harry  C.  Ehlers 
John  J.  Eland 
James  Farrelly,  Jr. 
Arthur  T.  Ferguson 
Patrick  J.  Foye 
Alfred  E.  Gabrielson 
Samuel  B.  Goldstein 
Frank  J.  Greeley 
William  Hamling 
Thomas  Hanrahan 
Clifford  L.  Holsinger 
William  H.  Hood 
Harley  J.  Jenkins 
Eddie  A.  Johnson 
Elmer  O.  Joyce 


Joe  Kopech 
Ben  Kotz 
Rychard  Kozicki 
John  I.  Kukielski 
Millard  Lambert 
Joseph  Lin.  '-r 
Isser  Lipson 
Leo  Mandel 
James  F.  Matias 
Willie  Mayberry 
Fremont  R.  Metcalf 
John  Moore 
William  J.  Moran 
Thomas  Morrissey 
Jozy  Myakoski 
Charles  H.  Mclntyre 
John  J.  McManus 
Clarence  L.  Norton 
Maryian  Olszanski 
.Alex.  Pejdzmski 


Charles  Poles 
Tony  P.  Powers 
Joseph  M.  Pyle 
Arthur  H.  Rohde 
Charles  Rutkus 
Clinton  A.  Sawyer 
Thomas  C.  Scully 
Sherman  W.  Secrist 
William  H.  Sewell 
Herman  E.  Snyder 
Anthony  Stroer 
Victor  R.  Sundberg 
Oscar  Swanson 
Roy  Thompson 
James  L.  Walls 
Max  Weinberg 
Frank  Williams 
Daniel  W.  Wilson 
John  Wittmeyer,  Jr. 
Alex.  Vanolko 


COMPANY  "K,"  35th  INFANTRY 


Mechanics — Continued 
Michael  Koshula 
George  H.  Black 
Peter  Guswinetz 

Buglers 
Frank  J.  Niesbrella 
John  Kerchinske 

Privates — First  Class 
Maurice  E.  Arundell 
John  V.  Bost 
Angelos  Buros 
Jack  H.  Fox 
George  J.  Grikshell 
Harry  H.  Joseph 
Thomas  Smittyklas 
Marion  Speagle 

Privates 
William  A.  Almblad 
Albin  S.  Anderson 


Bennea  Astrowski 
Richard  Bartik 
George  W.  Baumel 
Arthur  R.  Bosley 
Allie  Bird 
Earl  Brazil 
John  J.  Cunningham 
William  G.  Deacon 
Lyle  A.  Derr 
Oren  Dobey 
Emanuel  Dee  Doetsch 
Jacob  Dziki 
Grady  Earnest 
Rufus  Evans 
Adam  Gachewicz 
William  Gerhauser 
Aleck  Goldman 
Frank  E.  Graves 
Leo  Halanski 
John  C.  Hoffacker 
Irving  F.  Honeck 
Joseph  Hupka 


Continued  from  page  128 

Earl  James 
Julius  C.  Jensen 
James  Jonas 
Raphael  Keltz 
Walter  Kempenski 
Wallace  Kincaid 
Alik  Kirby 

Theodore  A.  Kjeldsen 
John  Klocke 
James  P.  Kondopulos 
John  Kosurek 
Alexander  Kowalski 
Herbert  Krump 
William  K.  Landom 
Frank  Lang 
Louis  J.  Levine 
Robert  G.  Larson 
Arthur  Livingston 
Wladymir  Malyniak 
John  H.  Manske 
John  McCarthy 
John  McGinty 


Robert  McSherry 
Andrew  Mickle 
Walter  R.  Miller 
Albert  Minicucci 
George  H.  Mokate 
Viggo  Nielsen 
Otto  Nimtz 
John  O'Donnell 
Richard  E.  Oliver 
William  Ostergaard 
John  J.  Pattock 
Frank  F.  Petrinovich 
William  F.  Pfeifer 
Joseph  Polinski 
Earl  P.  Polzin 
Adam  Pzybytowicz 
R.  R.  Quinn 
Charles  Quinn 
Jack  H.  Roach 
John  Ross 
George  Rossi 
Matt  F.  Ryan 


Albert  R.  See 
Jess  Sergent 
Paul  Sevrenson 
Charles  E.  Singleton 
F.  E.  Slevin 
Wactow  Smigulski 
William  O.  Sprinkle 
Oliver  Staples 
Wadyslaw  Storen 
Pete  Strbay 
Earnest  R.  Swanson 
Harry  S.  Swanson 
WiUiam  P.  Trumbull 
Stanley  Turoy 
Franklin  J.  Varela 
Bennie  A.  Voss 
Andrew  Vronka 
Norvid  F.  Wallin 
Nathan  Warshavsky 
Homer  Williams 
Charley  J.  Willison 
Max  Wolman 


195 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


EIGHTEENTH  TRENCH  MORTAR  BATTERY 

They  Started  Out  As  Machine  Gunners 


1~^HE  Hun  is  said  to  have  placed  his  most  stalwart 
machine  gun  units;  as  a  matter  of  fact  those  who 
have  gone  report  that  although  the  others  retreated, 
the  machine  gunners  stuck  to  the  bitter  end.  When  the 
personnel  of  this  organization,  formerly  the  Machine  Gun 
Troop  of  the  303rd  Cavalry,  was  selected,  Uncle  Sam  must 
have  had  in  mind  the  plan  of  going  the  Hun  one  better,  as 
he  did  in  poisonous  gases  and  everything  else  which  he 
attempted. 

The  various  officers  who  have  been  with  the  Eighteenth 
Trench  Mortar  Battery  are  unanimous  in  their  report  of 
the  loyal  support  of  the  men.  At  all  times  they  have  come 
across  with  everything  which  could  be  desired.  The  men 
of  no  organization  have  been  more  willing  to  make  sacri- 
fices in  subscribing  for  any  worthy  cause  which  has  been 
brought  before  them.  A  brotherly  feeUng  has  existed  in 
this  organization  which  will  long  be  felt  and  sadly  missed 
when  the  men  are  finally  mustered  out  into  civil  life.  For 
instance.  First  Sergeant  Lampkins  was  dollars  short  one 
day  in  handling  some  funds  belonging  to  the  battery — 
whether  this  was  due  to  a  mistake  in  making  change  or 
whether  some  one  actually  scampered  away  with  a  ten 
dollar  bill,  no  one  ever  knew;  however,  the  next  morning 
the  sergeant  was  presented  with  a  handful  of  nickels  and 
dimes  by  the  men,  amounting  to  a  round  ten  dollars. 
This  merely  illustrates  a  happy  state  of  relations  existing 
among  the  soldiers  of  this  organization.  What  a  golden 
age  we  would  live  in  if  the  greedy  merchants  and  sales 
people  could  share  this  spirit  with  us!  One  of  the  men 
who  had  just  been  discharged  from  the  service  drew  his 
last  check  for  $16.07.  He  had  a  wife  and  new-born  babe 
in  town  and  no  home  in  which  to  go.  Again  the  men  ral- 
lied to  the  cause  and  each  one  chipped  in  to  his  utmost  to 
send  the  brother  on  his  way  with  enough  to  keep  him  until 
he  secured  a  job.    Again  the  men  of  the  army,  though 


their  pay  is  a  pittance  compared  to  the  civilian's  pay,  have 
done  a  deed  and  taught  a  lesson.  There  are  no  tight  wads 
here. 

During  May,  1918,  the  men  began  arriving  at  Camp 
Stanley  from  Texas,  Oklahoma  and  Illinois,  and  from 
Chicago  and  New  York.  After  several  weeks  of  dis- 
mounted drill  they  were  put  on  horses  and  practically  re- 
mained there  during  the  rest  of  the  scorching  summer. 
Probably  no  man  had  ever  worked  so  hard,  but  every  lick 
had  its  effect,  for  when  the  303rd  Cavalry  passed  in 
mounted  review  before  General  Holbrook  on  the  first  of 
August,  it  was  no  longer  a  mob  of  rookies  but  a  regiment 
of  well-trained  soldiers. 

After  the  twelve  troops  of  the  303rd  Cavalry  had  been 
organized,  the  ofiicers  of  the  Machine  Gun  Troop-to-be 
gradually  selected  men  for  their  machine  gun  organization 
from  the  other  twelve  troops.  In  making  their  selections 
they  looked  into  each  man's  record  and  qualifications,  for 
machine  gunners  must  be  above  the  average  in  strength, 
of  steady  nerve,  keen  sight  and  mechanically  inclined. 
This  organization  was  complete  by  the  end  of  May  and 
from  that  time  really  dates  the  birth  of  the  Eighteenth 
Trench  Mortar  Battery. 

On  August  15th  the  303rd  Cavalry  was  converted  into 
field  artillery.  At  this  time  the  303rd  Machine  Gun  Troop 
was  made  into  a  separate  organization,  the  Eighteenth 
Trench  Mortar  Battery,  brigaded  with  the  Eighteenth  Field 
Artillery  Brigade,  and  moved  to  Camp  Travis,  Texas. 
Here  it  remained.  The  Boche  was  whipped  and  with 
nothing  in  view  to  fight,  the  men  of  this  battery  pined 
away,  for  the  next  war  seemed  a  long  way  off;  however, 
everyone  agreed  that  our  work  was  not  labor  lost,  but  an 
education  in  a  new  field  and  phase  of  life.  The  members 
of  the  Eighteenth  Trench  Mortar  Battery  will  go  home 
when  the  time  comes,  as  men,  not  boys. 


196] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


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[197] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


218th  ENGINEERS  (SAPPERS) 

They  Beat  the  Flu  Instead  of  the  Hun 


PROBABLY    the    youngest    organization    in    Camp 
Travis — from  the  point  of  its  arrival  in  camp — was 
the  218th  Engineers,  one  of  six  divisional  engineering 
regiments  ordered  organized  on  July  31,  1918,  when  six 
infantn,-    divisions    were    authorized.     The    instructions 
caUing  for  the  formation  of  this  regiment  ordered  that  the 

or}.'anization  should  take 
place  at  Camp  A.  A. 
Humphreys,  Va.,  where, 
upon  completion  of  a  two 
months'  course  of  train- 
ing in  special  engineer- 
ing work,  it  would  join 
the  Eighteenth  Division 
at  Camp  Travis,  Texas. 
It  was  expected  that  this 
regiment  would  go  over- 
seas with  the  Eighteenth 
Division  in  January, 
1919,  and,  after  a  two 
months  training  period 
in  France,  would  go  to 
take   its   place  on   the   firing   line. 

Owing  to  the  fact  that  the  first  draft  was  about  ex- 
hausted and  that  the  second  draft  law  had  not  yet  become 
operative  it  was  evident  that  no  men  would  be  available 
for  this  regiment  until  the  September  call  of  the  draft. 
It  was  accordingly  decided  that  this  regiment  would  be 
organized  principally  from  men  called  into  the  service 
about  September  5th.  The  non-commissioned  officers 
were  to  be  obtained  from  the  schools  at  Camp  A.  A. 
Humphreys,  Va.,  where  they  were  already  in  training. 
In  addition  about  forty  enlisted  men  of  two  or  more 
years'  service  in  the  tropics  of  the  Third  U.  S.  Engi- 
neers at  Corozal,  Canal  Zone,  were  ordered  transferred 
to  the  218th  Engineers.  The  regiment  was  therefore 
assured  of  having  a  well  trained  cadre  of  non-commis- 
sioned officers. 

In  the  meantime,  Colonel  W.  D.  A.  Anderson,  Corps  of 
Engineers  U.  S.  Army,  a  regular  officer  and  graduate  of  the 
United  States  Military  Academy,  who  was  then  on  duty 
in  the  Department  of  Panama,  as  chief  of  staff  and  de- 
partment engineer,  had  been  ordered  to  Camp  Humph- 
reys, Va.,  to  take  command  of  the  218th  Engineers.  On 
September  26th  the  commanding  general  at  Camp  Humph- 
reys ordered  the  transfer  of  35  officers  and  597  enlisted 
men  to  the  218th  Engineers,  from  the  Second,  Third, 
Fourth,  Fifth,  Sixth,  and  Seventh^ Training  Regiments  at 
that  place.  These  officers  and  meri  together  with  the  forty 
men  from  the  Third  Engineers  in  Panama  and  officers  pre- 
viously ordered  to  the  regiment  by  War  Department  orders 


gave  the  regiment  a  nucleus  of  40  officers  and  617  men. 

A  course  of  intensive  instruction  designed  to  fit  this 
nucleus  for  expansion  into  a  complete  regiment  was  im- 
mediately instituted.  Daily  drill  periods  were  from  7 
o'clock  in  the  morning  until  5:30  in  the  afternoon,  with  an 
hour  and  a  half  off  for  lunch.  Particular  attention  was 
paid  to  the  instruction  of  men  in  the  various  engineering 
specialties,  such  as  fortifications,  ]X)ntoon  bridging,  timber 
bridging,  and  roads. 

During  this  period  the  epidemic  of  Spanish  influenza 
started  at  Camp  Humphreys  and  spread  with  incredible 
rapidity.  It  was  apparent  that  to  combat  its  spread  suc- 
cessfully, instruction  and  drills  would  have  to  be  curtailed 
and  the  energies  of  all  directed  against  the  disease.  It 
was  then  that  the  mettle  of  the  men  in  the  organization 
received  its  first  test.  Every  man  cheerfully  did  his  part 
in  nursing  and  caring  for  those  who  were  stricken.  In  spite 
of  the  fact  that  we  were  fighting  an  unseen  foe  and  knew 
not  where  he  would  strike  next,  nobody  shirked.  As  a 
result  of  such  splendid  conduct  there  were  only  nine  deaths 
in  the  regiment  and  the  epidemic  was  soon  controlled. 
The  conduct  and  record  of  the  218th  Engineers  during  one 
of  the  most  severe  epidemics  that  had  run  through  any 
camp  in  the  country  gained  the  praise  of  the  commanding 
general  at  Camp  Humphreys,  who  made  the  statement 
that  the  sick  record  and  death  rate  of  the  218th  Engineers 
was  the  lowest  of  any  organization  in  the  camp  where 
there  were  at  the  same  time  about  twenty  other  regiments 
and  separate  battalions. 

On  November  1st,  1918, 
this  regiment  received  its 
orders  to  proceed  to  Camp 
Travis,  Texas,  to  join  the 
Eighteenth  Division.  On 
November  5th  the  regiment 
entrained,  and  arrived  at 
Camp  Travis  on  November 
9th.  Two  days  after  arrival 
the  news  of  the  signing  of 
the  armistice  was  received. 
While  overjoyed  at  the 
thought  of  peace  again 
and  perhaps  a  speedy  return 
home,  still  there  was  con- 
siderable disappointment  in 

that  we  had  not  been  permitted  the  opportunity  of  test- 
ing ourselves  against  the  enemy  and  letting  the  Hun  know 
the  stuff  we  were  made  of.  Everyone,  however,  reaUzed 
that  now  was  not  the  time  to  let  up  in  training,  and 
although  we  had  missed  the  opportunity  to  meet  the 
enemy,  we  decided  that  we  would  excel  in  our  training. 


198 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


?^-oJ 


COLONEL  ANDERSON  AND  STAFF,  218th  ENGINEERS 


Left  to  right — sitting 


Capt.  Artiiur  Osbome 
Capt.  A.  G.  Matthews 
Major  W.  X.  McDonald 
Col.  W.  I).  A.  Anderson 


Lieut.-Col.  R.  C.  Crawford 
Major  M.  B.  Reynolds 
Capt.  A.  A.  Green 
1st  Lieut.  H.  E.  Marchbanks 


Left  to  right — standing 

2nd  Lieut.  A.  K.  Foster  2nd  Lieut.  Paul  C.  Jones 

2nd  Lieut.  J.  M.  Byers  Chaplain  Jesse  P.  Thomberry 

1st  Lieut.  Chas.  E.  Mclntyre  2nd  Lieut.  Chas.  Parrish 

1st  Lieut.  Howard  H.  Webster  2nd  Lieut.  E.  R.  Slade 


199 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


HEADQUARTERS   COMPANY,  21Sth   ENGINEERS 


Regimental  Sergeant  Majors 
Alfred  J.  Acres 
Malcolm  W.  Ford 

Master  Engineer — Senior  Grade 
George  A.  Bro^vn 

Master  Engineer — Junior  Grade 
Michael  J.  Finucane 
Harr>-  S.  Tipton 

Regimental  Supply  Sergeants 
Henry  R.  Bennett 
Anthony  H.  Krut 

Battalion  Sergeant  Majors 
Joseph  Hazin 
John  Haasler 

First  Sergeant 
Nicholas  J.  Popma 

Sergeants — First  Class 
Horace  C.  HiU 
Clarence  B.  Eyler 


Sergeant  Bugler 
Harry  E.  Stone 

Color  Sergeants 
Bert  Spurrier 
Louis  A.  Smith 

Sergeants 
Peter  B.  Torell 
Arthur  Thompson 
Ernest  R.  Jensen 

Supply  Sergeant 
Arthur  W.  Reed 

Mess  Sergeant 
George  J.  Kraus 

Stable  Sergeant 
Earl  L.  Gile 

Corporals 
LeRoy  E.  Glunt 
Harry  D.  Keller 
Richard  G.  Williams 


Captain  Arthur  Osborne 

William  H.  Henze 
Harry  A.  Lynn 
John  E.  McCabe 
Roy  R.  Campbell 
James  C.  Hawkins 
Leon  H.  Seely 
Allen  Duxbury 

Cooks 
John  Adam  Christ 
Michael  A.  Bruckbauer 
Ben  Melancon 

Horseshoers 
Howard  L.  Gramling 
Samuel  H.  Rodgers 

Mechanics 
Sebastiano  Ferlauto 
Earel  Naporer 
Howard  C.  Shrewsbury 

Wagoners 
Thomas  Bratton 
Herman  Sandburg 
Robert  J.  Cook 


John  Donahee 
Perry  J.  Gale 
Ralph  E.  Morse 
William  E.  Prittie 
Edward  B.  Young 

Privates — First  Class 
William  B.  Aitkin 
Solly  Birnfield 
Mark  F.  Freuler 
Raymond  H.  Lee 
August  G.  Babinski 
Joshua  McDaniel 

Privates 
George  E.  Banning 
Salvatore  Belino 
Earl  Champion 
Thomas  Coughlin 
Phillip  A.  Garofano 
Sevey  E.  Hanson 
Thomas  A.  Lentz 
William  F.  Crapes 
Frederick  C.  H.  Diebler 
John  J.  Ehmen 
Morris  Firstman 


Ira  L.  Fleischman 
Arthur  S.  Fluharty 
Paul  Fuhs 
Techo  Grosso 
Gerald  Hanna 
Vincenc  A.  Heenan 
Harrison  il.  Hewitt 
Benjamin  Ireland 
Charles  A.  Jacklin 
William  J.  Kelly 
Samuel  Laj-man 
William  Moran 
Sebastiano  Pepe 
William  Leslie  Powell 
Eari  W.  Randolf 
Joseph  E.  Reardon 
Otto  H.  Schweikert 
Paul  Sargakis 
Abraham  Sheps 
Henr>'  H.  Sier 
Charles  H.  Sims 
John  M.  Watson 
WiUiam  M.  West 
Bernard  T.  White 
Edward  J.  White 


200] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


COMPANY  "A,"  218th  ENGINEERS 


1st  Lieut.  George  E.  Mclntyre 

Sergeants — First  Class 

Charles  C.  Grubb 
Louis  H.  DriscoU 

Sergeants 

Gurmar  E.  Gunderson 
Harry  H.  Famum 
John  F.  Ha\vxby 
Christopher  T.  Soren 
Supply  Sergeant 
Jack  Lechtenbaum 

Mess  Sergeant 
Theodore  Myers 

Stable  Sergeant 

Frank  S.  Hunt 

Corporals 

John  H.  McMullen 
Joseph  N.  Schaaf 


Captain  Simes  T.  Hoyt 
2d  Lieut.  Warren  R.  Neuman  2d  Lieut.  Ernest  C.  Fortier 


Everett  C.  Scrensen 
Kenneth  E.  Thieraan 
Albert  E.  A.  Fuchs 
James  A.  Turner 
Elmer  Freund 
Joseph  F.  Simccck 
Hans  W.  Tusbil 
Peter  A.  Kos 

Cooks 

Herman  Roschefski 
Elsie  Haynes 
James  McCaine 

Wagoners 

Robert  E.  Clark 
Joseph  L.  Magee 
Herman  A.  Cochlin 
William  H.  Breece 
Frank  D.  Bukowski 
Albert  Pahlck 


Privates — First  Class 

Henry  A.  Bartels 
Ormond  Berry 
Edward  Broge 
Harry  Coppinger 
WUiam  C.  Leonard 
William  MacFarand 
Charles  S.  McBride 
Paul  Traynor 

Buglers 

Albert  L.  Moffitt 
Frank  Raciburski 

Privates 

Frank  J.  Abert 
William  S.  Bourland 
Oreste  Bozza 
John  H.  Carnes 
Dorainick  Cella 
James  W.  Champion 


Emmett  M.  Clark 
John  Cloud 
Leo  F.  Cogan 
Edgar  G.  Colkitt 
James  Colletti 
Thomas  F.  Cosgrove 
Herbert  F.  Dorn 
Scott  E.  Dotson 
John  Dunn 
David  F.  Eppes 
James  V.  Everhardt 
Howard  G.  Fenner 
McKinley  H.  Flint 
Joseph  Gallagher 
Herman  C.  Gassier 
Rudolph  Hackbarth 
Joseph  Halligan 
Morris  Handel 
Harry  B.  Inglis 
Joseph  L.  Jacobus 
George  S.  Jar  vis 
Clyde  H.  Johnston 


1st  Sergeant  Elmer  Snyder 

Robert  S.  Kirland 
Jacob  J.  Klenk,  Jr. 
Harry  Lerch 
George  B.  Litchfield 
William  T.  McGuire 
George  Mazie 
Ben.  Meisner 
Peter  Michalewski 
Peter  J.  Miller 
James  J.  Nally 
Albert  Schmidt 
Roland  J.  Schwartz 
Garry  Sinkway 
Michael  L.  Taxacher 
John  VanDorn,  Jr. 
Gallen  E.  Vittum 
George  Waldie 
Elmer  W.  Whalev 
Charles  O.  Wood" 
Frank  E.  Wyant 
Wasil  Yucho 
Girduy  Zerangue 


*♦■.-- 


201 


CAMP     T  R  A  \  I  S     AND     THE     WORLD     WAR 


COMPANY  "B ,"  218th  ENGINEERS 


2d  Lieut.  George  W.  Foster 


First  Sergeant 
John  Alexander  Alt 

Sergeants — First  Class 
Edward  L.  Malsbary 
William  WiUoughbj' 

Sergeants 
Willis  O.  Tipton 
Frank  A.  Deregon 
Merton  C.  Nyberg 
Charles  M.  Kramer 
William  J.  Karaszewski 
Supply  Sergeant  Louis  Binder 
Mess  Sergeant  Edwin  John  Breen 
Stable  Sergeant  Alfred  W.  Ruflf 

Corporals 
Robert  F.  Hubbard 
Alfredo  Cordon  i 
George  Edward  Deming 
Walford  M.  Rierson 
William  T.  Wallace 


Graham  S.  Vin-son 
John  O.  Hughey 
William  A.  Smith 
Railia  Yacka 
George  Leverle 
Walter  G.'Ulbrich 
Homer  T.  HaU 
William  Mack 
Clarence  W.  Gillis 
Paul  J.  Anders 
Cooks 
Boyd  F.  Fausey 
William  F.  Andrews 
Nicola  Buontempo 
Thomas  B.  Stamatelos 

Horseshoer 
Robert  L.  Ellis 

Wagoners 
William  Moore 


2d  Lieut.  William  .\.  Jones 

David  G.  Cox 
Michael  Rarioppi 
Robert  C.  Phillips 
Adolph  Davis 
Harrj'  J.  VanGeffen 

Privates — First  Class 
Raymond  I..  Beaty 
Fayette  N.  Broughman 
Harold  H.  Gassmann 
George  H.  Hunt.  Jr. 
Peter  J.  Jachetti 
WiUiam  A.  F.Kuemmel 
Orville  Kurtz 
.\ugust  Meyer 
Manuel  Montoya 
Joe  Owen 
Fred  C.  Powell 
Henr>'  H.  Prina 
Frederick  Scholz 
Charles  E.  Tracy 


2d  Lieut.  Donald  MacAskill 


Garr\-  \'an  Dongen 

Buglers 
-Angelo  C.  Salerno 
John  A.  Naylor 

Privates 
John  Byard 
Buttler  Chapmann 
William  B.  Colgan,  Jr. 
Coleman  Connei^,  Jr. 
Joe  DWngelo 
Louis  H.  Eckhardt 
Biagie  Fredella 
Bernard  Friedman 
Charlie  B.  Fuller 
Horace  L.  Gatlin 
Hatry  Glass 
Claud  B.  Green 
Raffale  Guarracino 
Harrv  L.  Hamilton 


George  Humblias 
.\ugust  H.  Kelinske 
George  M.  Krieger 
Charley  Lingren 
John  Lombardi 
Salvatore  Longobardi 
Charles  J.  Lunau 
.■\rchie  H.  Mc.\lpine 
Leo  G.  Marchman 
.\lfredo  L.  Martinez 
Eldon  J.  Mereness 
.\nthony  Mikulonies 
Elgar  L.  Moore 
Dennis  Mungoili 
Norman  R.  Needhara 
Timothy  J.  O'Brien 
Floyd  T.  Pace 
.\rchie  H.  Pittman 
Martino  Ridolfe 
Abe  Rockaway 
Louis  Stepanski 


[202] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


COMPANY  "C,"  218th  ENGINEERS 


1st  Lieut.  Kenneth  Q.  Volk 


2nd  Lieut.  Isaac  F.  Betts 


2nd  Lieut.  Frank  G.  Kelly 


2nd  Lieut.  William  M.  Schlecht 


Sergeants — First  Class 

Homer  DeHart 
William  E.  Burtoft 

Sergeants 

William  L.  Blacknell 
John  A.  Shepard 
Robert  J.  Roach 
Charles  C.  Steen 
Robert  J.  Peppers 

Corporals 

Timothy  F.  O'Hearn 
Mike  Curtin 
William  D.  Taylor 
Levi  K.  Corthell 
John  E.  Warden 
Thomas  0.  HoUeran 
N'incent  P.  Sweeney 
Charles  W.  Cromer 


1st  Sergeant  George  A.  Smith 
Supply  Sergt.  Mark  S.  Shmooskes 


Mess  Sergt.  Guy  LeRoy  Wallace 
Stable  Sergt.  Michael  J.  Ryan 


Addison  D.  Davis 
George  L.  Theiss 
Albert  A.  Tomaszewski 

Cooks 

John  Baisi 

Joseph  D.  A.  Houle 

Lewis  T.  Craig,  Jr. 

Wagoners 

James  H.  Mays 
William  Carman 
Mark  J.  Lovern 
Bucie  T.  Lovvry 

Privates— First  Class 

Dight  Balfour 
Otto  H.  Berg 
James  Boatright 
John  G.  Davis 


Christian  F.  Jensen 
Martin  Kukulski 
Donald  G.  Mitchell 
Jason  A.  Newton 
Ceasar  Quaglieri 
Edward  L.  Schlein 
Frank  W.  Stolte 
Harold  P.  Straus 
Paul  H.  White 

Buglers 

Bert  C.  Ebel 
Leo  J.  Callahan 

Privates 

Louis  J.  Amish 
\'incenzo  Astuto 
Ernest  E.  Baals 
Nicholas  J.  Barbieri 
Samuel  B.  Brandt 
James  J.  Cahill 


Casimiro  Chiarello 
Jim  Colvin 
Antonio  Cunha 
Frank  James  Cunningham 
George  M.  Denham 
Lorenzo  DiBello 
Edward  K.  Dugat 
Carl  L.  Esau 
John  C.  Fabriguze 
Thomas  A.  Fitzsimon 
George  D.  Gartling 
William  F.  Grover 
Joseph  P.  Hannigan 
Robert  Harrington 
Jess  H.  Holland 
Pasquale  lazzetta 
Arthur  M.  Johnson 
Adriano  Laurienti 
Hainy  Lesser 
Ollie  F.  McConnell 
Patrick  J.  McHugh 


Aaron  J.  Mattox 
Michael  J.  Nestor 
Harry  J.  Oldt 
Charles  T.  Reynolds 
Aubra  Robinson 
Robert  R.  Basi 
R.  Rosella 
Albert  J.  Roth 
George  I.  Sandusky 
James  Sesta 
William  G.  Springer 
Lester  R.  Stocker 
James  A.  Strubler 
Ulysses  C.  Talley 
Posey  G.  Trusler 
Leonard  W.  VanArsdale 
Curtis  Wagner 
Albert  Welden 
George  C.  Whitehead,  Jr. 
James  R.  Williams 


203 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


2nd  Lieut.  Eugene  F.  Gier 
2nd  Lieut.  John  M.  Byers 


COMPANY  "D,"  218th  ENGINEERS 

2nd  Lieut.  Roland  D.  Pierson 
2nd  Lieut.  Julian  C.  Spotts 


2nd  Lieut.  William  L.  Reynolds 
First  Sergeant  August  F.  Voeltz 


Sergeant — First  Class 
Walter  H.  Lyon 

Sergeants 
Jesse  Groves 
Theodore  Johnson 
Michael  F.  Sullivan 
Sidney  J.  Ferguson,  Jr. 
\'ictor  B.  Smith 
Elmer  Alexander  Drury 

Mess  Sergeant 
Charles  E.  Sequine 

Stable  Sergeant 
Sofus  P.  Sorensen 

Corporals 
Clyde  St.  J.  Hoyt 
Oscar  Fugman 
Thomas  A.  Ferguson 
John  L.  Lewis 


Joe  H.  Williamson 
Nix  Webb 

William  R.  Townsend 
Earl  J.  Mattis 
Earnest  A.  Oakley 
John  J.  Murray 
William  J.  Bastian 
Stephen  W.  Boyle 
William  J.  A.  Donovan 

Cooks 
Joseph  Stachowiak 
Herman  A.  Wolf 
Ross  W.  Cunningham 

Privates — First  Class 
W'illiam  Bell 
Max  J.  Burnstine 
Ward  Conklin 
Roy  H.  Daugherty 
Frank  M.  Emerson 


James  Lee  Gossard 
Harry  Hansman 
Isadore  Levy 
Albert  E.  Lyle 
Anthony  P.  Maresca 
Francesco  A.  Pennell 
Richard  J.  Pound 
Joseph  L.  Simpkins 
August  Winter 
George  W' inters 

Bugler 
John  H.  Kauffman 

Privates 
William  G.  Butler 
John  A.  Cancro 
Cataldo  Castello 
Giuseppe  Cataldo 
Hyman  Cohen 
Frank  Crucioli 
Charles  M.  Daglian 


Umberto  D'Emidio 
Dominick  Detro 
John  E.  Dowdle 
Arthur  W.  Doyle 
John  Drummond 
Antonio  Filiaci 
Ralph  H.  Fink 
Constantine  Fiori 
Julian  Flood 
Constantine  Georgaris 
Alfred  Hackitt 
Berlin  Hansen 
John  E.  Hanson 
Clyde  W.  Harris 
I  John  W.  Hart 
!  Paul  James 
'  Earl  Joslin 
Frederick  L.  Kempf 
Henry  Kenimer 
George  J.  Lawrence 
Neshan  Melkonian 


Antonio  Menartsij 
Herbert  Q.  Mordecai 
John  J.  Muszynski 
Herman  E.  Myers 
Jerome  J.  O'Brien 
Charles  G.  O'Grady 
Charles  Pack 
John  R.  Reilly 
Ecro  Rodriquez 
Harry  Rosenthall 
Carlyle  Rudolph 
Wilbert  Schmidt 
Lewis  Schwartz 
Frank  Scielzo 
William  N.  Schakelford 
Lawrence  T.  Sullivan 
John  Swiantowski 
Edd  Taub 
William  Vonderheit 
Martin  W.  Walsh 
Julius  Zouwtsky 


204] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


1st  Lieut.  Joseph  A.  Dodge 


COMPANY  "E,"  218th  ENGINEERS 

Captain  Clifford  J.  Thiebaud 
2nd  Lieut.  James  R.  Hood 


2nd  Lieut.  Ray  N.  Moore 


Sergeants — First  Class 

William  Henry 
Charles  F.  Muggy 

Sergeants 

Leonard  T.  Chinn 
Percy  C.  Hancock 
James  L.  Robinson 
Fred  N.  Thomas 
Thomas  R.  Hunter 

Corporals 

Horace  L.  Snedeker 
Jose  N.  Sequeire 
Richard  H.  Kingsley 
Glenn  D.  Torpey 
William  C.  Morris 
Thomas  W.  Loring 
Benjamin  A.  Schannon 


First  Sergeant  Mark  A.  Copeland 
Mess  Sergeant  Leon  M.  Dunn 


Supply  Sergeant  Alfred  Zimmer 
Stable  Sergeant  Joseph  J.  Reddy 


William  E.  Bickel 
Thomas  A.  E.  Tellefson 
Leonard  C.  VanDyke 
Maurice  J.  Walls 

Cooks 
Anthony  B.  Baithmare 
Emil  Miebach 
William  Tierney 

Wagoners 
Charles  Dunlap 
William  Carr 
Edgar  V.  Umberger 
Robert  D.  Fischer 

Privates — First  Class 
Marvin  G.  Angle 
Robert  Wesley  Apel 
Roy  .Augustus  Cox 
David  Leonard  Hanson 


Wilber  J.  Higgins 
William  Ruby 
Harold  A.  Schultz 
Roy  Seeds 

Buglers 

Dighton  Little 
Joseph  Cimino 

Privates 

George  Adelhoch 
Giacomo  Arturo 
John  T.  Barry 
Charles  A.  Beck 
Arthur  Broomes 
Frank  Butcher 
Giacomo  Caladera 
Claude  M.  Denney 
Adelbert  B.  Evans 
Sam  Evelle 


William  F.  Fechtman 
Alfonso  G.  Freda 
Otto  F.  Fritsche 
Anthony  Gaggero 
Ulysses  H.  Gibbs 
John  L.  Goode 
John  G.  Guenther 
Edward  Hascup 
James  Heade,  Jr. 
Charles  A.  Hippelli 
Raymond  F.  Hoagland 
James  Jolly 
Harry  H.  Kirchman 
Grady  C.  Lacy 
Nicholas  McCardall 
Cosimo  Maiolo 
Homer  M.  Morris 
Francesco  Neroni 
Leonard  L.  Nickel 
Robert  D.  Nugent 
.Bert  F.  Omundson 


Frank'O.  Paicer 
William  K  Peterson 
Preston  P.  PoweU 
Charles  W.  Rieley 
Charles  W.  Rook 
Joseph  Rose 
Anthony  Rotandi 
Herbert  W.  Russell 
Frank  Shanker 
Dominick  Spinoso 
Preface  F.  Strickland 
Henry  R.  Stroud 
Ruben  H.  Stubbs 
Charles  Swann 
Claud  B.  Swope 
Earl  D.  Thayer 
William  S.  Thompson 
Edward  Turner 
Eugene  S.  Watson 
Martin  Wieczorkowski 
Joseph  Zinno 


[205] 


CAMP    TRAVIS     AND    THE     WORLD     WAR 


'^^aSAei! 


COilPAXV     1,  '  218th  ENGrNEERS 
Capt.  Herbert  T.  Gerrish 


1st  Lieut.  Christopher  Creighton 

2nd  Lieut.  Harold  S.  Murray 

2nd  Lieut.  Edwin  B.  Scott 

1st  Sergeant  Gustave  Heil 

Sergeants — ^First  Class 

Mess  Sergeant 

James  R.  VanThun 

Privates— First  Class 

Leo  C.  Maxwell 

John  H.  Osborne 

Houston  T.  Cory 

Albert  Knollhuff 

Earl  Toothman 

Cooks 
Edward  Koch 

Henrv'  W.  Lvnn 

Sergeants 

Stable  Sergeant 

Carleton  B.  Olmsted 
James  0.  V'each 

Arch  Gathright 

George  Lang 

Louis  B.  Whitman 

Adelbert  E.  Xelson 

Othen  Coris 

Peter  J.  Sorvig 
John  F.  Xiemic 

Corporals 

Wagoners 

Buglers 
Harold  W.  Bisel 

Frank  E.  Kelly 

Leslie  E.  Schuler 

James  T.  Heather 

John  E.  Townsend 

Charles  M.  Edwards 

John  C.  Sohn 

Alfred  H.  Lisle 

Privates 

Walter  J.  Wieger 

Merle  E.  Murphy 

Fred  L.  .\nderson 

Supply  Sergeant 

Stedman  V.  Wadmond 

Harold  Quakenbush 

John  A.  Berger 

Matt  Siglenec 

Harvey  A.  Simons 

Russell  W.  Bernhard 

Gilbert  \V.  Tessmer 

Thomas  F.  Shevelier 

CharUe  C.  Berr>- 

Continued  on  page  310 

[206] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


MEDICAL  DETACHMENT,  218th  ENGINEERS 

Captain  James  L.  Lubrecht 
1st  Lieut.  Howard  E.  Marchbanks  1st  Lieut.  Charles  E.  McEntire 

1st  Lieut.  Ralph  Lovelady  1st  Lieut.  Howard  H.  Webster 


Sergeants 

Oscar  Leonard  Dahlin 
Joseph  A.  Brady 

Corporals 
Lester  W.  Brenner 

Private — First  Class 
Dennis  Hogan 


Privates 

Joe  W.  Carter 
Joseph  Dagrossa 
James  A.  Etheridge 
William  E.  McAndrews 
William  A.  Marriam 
Meyer  Millekofsky 
Maddison  F.  Morgan 
John  M.  Padgett 
Vernon  D.  Ross 
Floyd  F.  Sherrow 
John  Y.  Winton 


207 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


218th  FIELD  SIGNAL  BATTALION 


Major  Edward  A.  Olsen 


Corporals 
Chas.  A.  Larson 
Alfred  A.  Menzel 


HEADQUARTERSjigECTION 
2nd  Lieut.  E.  L.  Widemire,  Battalion  Adjutant 


Chauffeurs 
Claud  F.  Oliver 
Carl  H.  Thoreson 


Privates — First  Class 
Floyd  H.  Barrett 
Gervase  L.  Corbeil 
Waldo  M.  Hathawav 


Chaplain  Herbert  Haywood 

Joseph  W.  Lax 
Craft  Saunders 


Private 
Joseph  A.  Specht 


Sergeant — First  Class 
Chester  W.  Gracey 

Chauffeur — First  Class 
Hugh  J.  Musgrove 


SUPPLY  SECTION 
2nd  Lieut.  Wm.  A.  Lankton,  Supply  Officer 

Chauffeur 
Robert  W.  Calvert 


Denzil  R.  Carr 
Leslie  F.  Horton 
Clay  J.  Stingley 


Privates — First  Class 
John  Q.  Bandy 


Privates 
Tony  Adams 


Gleason  M.  Gregory 
Donald  D.  Kennedy 
Emil  K.  Polasek 
Charles  E.  Morton 


Sergeant — First  Class 
Clyde  C.  Womble 

Sergeants 
Charles  R.  Ater 
Boyd  A.  Rainey 
Albert  E.  Swartz 

Corporals 
Harry  P.  Cloud 


COMPANY  "A" 
Captain  Clarence  A.  Garrett 


Sam  N.  Home 
Charles  F.  Kraus 
William  L.  Peterson 
Maui  ice  E.  Phillips 
WiUiam  R.  Rivett 

Privates — First  Class 
Royal  B.  Bown 
Edison  L.  Fix 


Max  Geffen 
Shipions  Gianvecchio 
James  E.  Hall 
James  B.  McDonald 
Fred  A.  McDonald 
William  G.  Peck 
Laurel  Rock 

Privates 
Clayton  L.  Cross 


MvTon  V.  Hall 
John  W.  Haywood 
Alfred  Hubbard 
William  L.  Melcher 
Robert  G.  Reynolds 
Joseph  Tiperi 
Richard  \\TieeIer 
Raymond  T.  Williamson 


COMPANY  "B" 
1st  Lieut.  Cornelius  A.  Dougherty  Jerome  C.  Cutting,  Master  Signal  Electrician 


Sergeants 
Leo  A.  Mielke 
Peter  J.  Simmons 
Herbert  S.  Watts 
John  S.  Wood 

Corporals 
Hugh  E.  Coppenbarger 
Bennie  L.  Durham 


R.  Ivan  Dubberly 
Henry  S.  Gardner 
OUver  L.  Johnson 
Roland  E.  Miller 
Edward  Heeps 

Privates — First  Class 
Chester  O.  Anderson 
William  E.  Barrett 


Norman  E.  Carter 
Walter  L.  Dorndorfer 
Thomas  R.  Dorsey 
Robt.  G.  Feldkirchner 
Rothwell  D.  Hatton 
Mannie  Meyer 
Charles  G.  Nash 
Henry  A.  Przybylski 
Paul  A.  Roberts 


Bernard  J.  \onderhcide 
Joseph  B.  Vorhees 

Privates 
Frank  G.  Allison 
Elmer  Barrow 
Jack  E.  Brewer 
O'Farrell  B.  Craddock 
Nels  K.  Dokken 


208 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


218th  FIELD  SIGNAL  BATTALION 


COMPANY  "W'—Cmdinued 


Thomas  E.  English 
Taylor  V.  Coons 
Jos.  Emma 


William  E.  Lamb 
William  F.  McCrea 
Forrest  L.  McKelvey 


Milton  F.  Schrimsher 
Fred  C.  SeU 
WiUiam  D.  Thomas 


Chas  H.  Wilkerson 


Captain  Robert  G.  Forsythe 


COMPANY  "C" 
2nd  Lieut.  Frank  H.  Mulcahy 


2nd  Lieut.  Wm.  M.  Gallagher 


Sergeants — First  Class 
Harvey  Alexander 
George  H.  Fisher 
Charles  Huenlich 
William  A.  Spring 
John  Trenchard 

Sergeants 
Clarence  F.  Dixon 
Arnold  H.  Dykman 
Stephen  F.  Manning 
Harvey  L.  Myers 
Joseph  E.  McKeever 

Corporals 
Benjamin  E.  Baker 
Thomas  H.  Brown 
Oscar  V.  Coburn 
Walter  H.  Duff 
Warren  B.  Garrott 


Joseph  B.  Lossolo 
Alonzo  McCuUough,  Jr. 
David  S.  Martin 
Lantz  K.  O'Dell 
Warren  A.  Peterman 
Robert  H.  Roseman 
Clifford  W.  Willes 
Justin  P.  Woolsey 
Theodore  Molitor 

Cook 
John  B.  Collar 

Privates — First  Class 
Harold  F.  Althen 
ESigar  G.  Berntson 
Clinton  P.  Beugler 
Victor  A.  Castle 
Elmer  J.  Hansen 
James  H.  Harris 


Silas  B.  Helton 
Edward  A.  Hutchmacher 
Ray  F.  PuUen 
Paul  Ries 
Wesley  B.  Sides 
Blanchard  K.  Slaughter 
Gilbert  P.  Snell 
Robert  I.  Sward 
Victor  F.  Zerega 

Privates 
John  E.  Allen 
Walter  Brandon 
Fred  G.  Breemes 
Roy  A.  Chastain 
Uriah  C.  Davis 
George  W.  Ennis 
Lester  Fullmer 
William  R.  Harley 
Newton  Hamish 


Andrew  Hart 
Leslie  D.  Hobbick 
Herman  L.  Hutton 
Glenn  Johnson 
Joseph  C.  Kaufer 
Isador  S.  Knobler 
John  C.  Krueger 
Carl  J.  Markhus 
Edward  G.  Mills 
Rudolph  Nelson 
Nicolai  L.  Nicolaison 
Oscar  Olin 
Jack  Pierson 
Thomas  M.  Price 
James  W.  Sheffield 
David  Todd 
Hoke  S.  Touchton 
Leslie  E.  Waters 
Willie  R.  Wilkerson 
Leslie  E.  Y'erkes 


Sergeant — First  Class 
John  Henderson,  Jr. 


MEDICAL  DETACHMENT 

Captain  Harry  F.  Bennett 

Sergeant 
Joseph  T.  Hamilton 


Private 
Ruel  B.  Foley 


PIGEON  SECTION 


"''Sergeant 
Jesse  E.'  Martin 


Chauffeurs 
Everett  N.  Jackson 
Henry  J.  Perez 


Private 
Douglass  L,  Coffee 


209' 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


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210] 


CAMP     TRAVIS     AND      THE     WORLD     WAR 


EIGHTEENTH  AMMUNITION  TRAIN 

Every  State  and  Five  Nationalities  Represented 


WHAT  may  be  termed  the  rainbow  unit  of  Camp 
Travis  is  the  Eighteenth  Ammunition  Train. 
Every  State  in  the  Union  is  represented  in  its 
enlisted  personnel  or  among  its  officers,  and  there  are  five 
nationalities  besides.  The  train  consisted  of  thirty-seven 
officers  and  one  hundred  and  ninety-one  enlisted  men,  and 
came  into  existence  September  19,  1918.  Major  Herbert 
R.  Dean,  a  military  man  of  nineteen  years'  experience,  the 
majority  of  which  was  spent  as  an  officer  in  the  Rhode 
Island  National  Guard  cavalry,  was  then  appointed  its 
commander. 

A  majority  of  the  officers  were  from  the  30.3rd  and  304th 
Cavalry  Regiments,  Major  Dean  him- 
self having  served  with  the  cavalry 
on  the  Mexican  border  in  1916  and 
later  with  the  304th  Cavalry  at  Cam]) 
Stanley.  Twenty-eight  officers  had 
also  been  connected  with  National 
Guard  organizations  and  the  average 
term  of  their  service  was  about  five 
and  one-half  years. 

During  the  first  week  of  the  train's 
existence  eleven  officers  and  sixty- 
eight  men  from  the  field  artillery 
school  at  Camp  Zachary  Taylor  re- 
ported for  duty.  As  additional  officers 
reported  they  were  required  to  join 
the  class  in  equitation,  which  met 
every  afternoon.  The  afternoons  were 
spent  in  motor  instruction  at  the 
motor  repair  shops.  The  object  was 
to  train  the  officers  as  efficiently  for 
horse  artillery  as  for  the  horseless 
branch,  so  that  they  might  be  in- 
terchangeable if  the  occasion  re- 
quired. 

With  the  transfer  of  ten  additional 
officers  and  seventy-eight  enlisted 
men  from  various  organizations  within 
the  division.  Major  Dean  was  enabled 
to  organize  two  battalions.  Captain 
Harvey  Christman  was  appointed 
commander  of  the  motor  battalion, 
and  Captain  Park  A.  Findlay  took 
command  of  the  horse  outfit. 

Realizing  the  necessity  of  rapid 
progress,  the  training  of  the  unit  was  intensive  from 
the  outset.  First  came  the  course  in  equitation,  during 
which  the  men  were  taught  to  handle  and  manage  their 
animals.  At  the  same  time  several  hours  daily  were 
devoted  to  motor  instruction.  This  was  largely  theo- 
retical for  a  time,  as  trucks  had  not  arrived. 

Renewed  enthusiasm  was  given  the  men  of  the  command 
when  a  number  of  motor  trucks  were  delivered  to  the 
motor  battalion  about  November  15th.  This  was  an  im- 
portant occasion  and  the  manner  in  which  the  motor  me- 
chanics and  chauffeurs  handled  themselves  when  given 
equipment  was  an  excellent  demonstration  of  the  efficiency 
of  the  Trade  Test  department.  The  men  selected  for  the 
operation  of  the  trucks  had  been  obtained  through  the 


trade  tests  and  after  being  qualified  had  been  transferred 
from  their  various  units  to  the  motor  battalion  of  the 
ammunition  train.  In  a  short  time  these  motor  mechanics 
and  drivers  acquired  the  efficiency  of  veterans  and  made 
exceptional  records  in  the  care,  maintenance  and  o])eration 
of  their  vehicles.  Good  records  for  speed  in  handling  the 
pieces  by  motor  power  was  made  by  the  men. 

Meantime,  the  men  of  the  horse  Imttalion  were  im- 
proving their  time.  Not  to  be  outdone  by  the  motor  bat- 
talion personnel,  they  were  working  hard  to  acquire  horse- 
manship. Particular  stress  was  laid  on  team  work  in  the 
various  squads  and  excellent  results  were  obtained.  The 
men  received  warm  commendation 
from  their  officers  on  the  condition 
of  their  equipment  and  their  gen- 
eral soldierly  appearance  and  bear- 
ing. During  this  period  also  the 
business  organization  of  the  train 
was  being  perfected  by  Sergeant- 
Major  Albert  J.  Pope  with  the 
assistance  of  Regimental  Sergeant 
Benjamin  H.  Keney,  so  that  all 
matters  were  administered  with 
promptness  and  despatch. 

While  the  efficiency  and  morale  of 
the  enlisted  personnel  were  being 
raised  to  a  high  standard,  atten- 
tion was  also  being  given  to  the 
social  welfare  of  the  officers.  This 
was  accomplished  through  the  estab- 
lishment of  the  Officers  Club  which 
was  formally  opened  with  a  recep- 
tion and  dance  early  in  November. 
Several  delightful  informal  affairs 
have  been  given  from  time  to  time 
at  the  club,  during  which  its  hos- 
pitality was  extended  to  officers  of  the 
Eighteenth  Division  as  well  as  their 
friends  and  relatives.  The  club  rooms 
were  tastefully  equipped  and  made 
as  cosy  and  comfortable  as  any  in 
the  army  camps. 

One  of  the  proudest  achievements 
of  the  command  has  been  its  fitness 
for  duty  at  all  times  since  it  reached 
the  acme  of  its  training.  At  no 
time  has  its  work  been  interfered  with  on  account 
of  serious  sickness  of  the  enlisted  men  or  officers.  In 
spite  of  the  rigorous  training,  the  men  throve  and  be- 
came as  hard  as  pine  knots.  No  casualties  were  recorded 
and  at  no  time  did  death  darken  the  portals.  The  spirit 
of  the  organization  has  been  beyond  criticism,  and  in 
the  estimation  of  their  officers  the  conduct  and  loyalty 
of  the  men  has  fully  justified  expectations.  The  acid 
test  of  morale  and  high  discipline  came  with  the  sign- 
ing of  the  armistice  with  Germany.  With  a  few  ex- 
ceptions, the  esprit  de  corps  was  maintained,  and 
it  is  stated  that  work  went  on  in  the  battalions  with 
the  same  eagerness  and  avidity  to  acquire  knowledge 
in  militarv  science  as  had  been  manifested  from  the  outset. 


211 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


Major  Herbert  R.  Dean 
Captain  Adam  Fisher 


18th  AMMUNITION  TRAIN 


Captain  Horace  Smith 
Captain  Harvey  Christian 


Captain  Robert  Y.  Gearhart 
Captain  Park  A.  Findley 


2nd  Lieut.  William  H.  Griswold 


Captain  Edward  B.  Crook 

Regimental  Sergeant  Major  Albert  J.  Pope 


HEADQUARTERS  COMPANY 

Regimental  Sergeant  Benjamin  H.  Keney 
Battalion  Sergeant  Major  John  E.  Belcher 


Sergeant 
Walter  J.  Saupe 

Corporals 
John  C.  Mayne,  Jr. 


Vemie  A.  Harris 
Fern  W.  Gordon 
Elbert  W.  Meyers 

Cook 
Waiie  E.  Bums 


Regimental  Supply  Sergeant  John  A.  Lavigne 

Wagoner 
Ben  Douglas 

Mechanic 
Bertie  I.  Glidewell 


Sergeant 
Fount  Speaks 


HEADQUARTERS  CO.  HORSE  BATTALION 
Captain  Claude  C.  Halley 


Corporals 
Conrad  H.  .\nderson 


Perrj'  M.  Gilbreath 
George  R.  Johnson 


Cook 
Charlie  L.  Mettler 


MEDICAL  DETACHMENT 
Captain  Daniel  Grant  1st  Lieut.  James  H.  Bruce 

Sergeant — First  Class  Privates 


Clarence  Eidam 


Robert  H.  Rettman 


Max  Silberman 


1st  Lieut.  Phillip  W.  Gross 


ORDNANCE  DETACHMENT 

1st  Lieut.  Howell  M.  Harris 


2nd  Lieut.  Clarence  M.  Burt 


Private— First  Class 
Henry  Heyward 

Privates 
Anthony  Casson 
Anthony  L.  Coletta 


William  J.  Collins 
Clarence  F.  Co.x 
Nathaniel  L.  ElUngsen 
Frank  A.  Fisher 
Domenick  Fortinpere 
Fred  L.  Foster 


Harr>'  Galatko 
Emery  J.  King 
Damase  A.  Larche 
John  M.  Liberty 
Harry  B.  Maywalt 
John  J.  McLoughlin 


David  R.  NicoU 
Marvin  D.  Orr 
Steve  Scimemi 
Matteo  Sugamele 


COMPANY  "A" 


Sergeant 
Brown  Lipscomb 

Corporals 

Edwin  C.  Northup 
Martin  C.  Thomae 
Michael  H.  Brand 
Joseph  Snyder 


1st  Lieut.  Michael  Grimaldi 
2nd  Lieut.  Percival  C.  Colket 

Fred  M.  Robinson 
John  S.  Runnels 

Cook 
Ernest  H.  Reed 

Privates — First  Class 
Arthur  F.  Anderson 


1st  Sergeant  Lowell  F.  Williams 
Supply  Sergeant  Joseph  W.  Day 

Fred  Barr 
PhiUip  A.  Bolton 
Homer  H.  Freidline 
John  E.  BeaU 
Harry  Manchester 
Luther  Smothers 

Privates 
HoUie  C.  Baker 


Joseph  B.  Boarman 
James  S  Cannon 
Fred  DeBrae 
Clifford  C.  Gregory 
Robert  L.  Harrison 
Walter  H.  Martin 
Thomas  G.  Phinney 
Hjalmar  Swanson 
William  B.  Tysinger 


Captain  William  A.  Erwin 

Sergeants 
William  Bums 
Cecil  F.  Cantley 

Corporals 
Otto  O.  Hess 
Archie  W.  Pyle 
William  H.  Deppe 


COMPANY  "B" 

2nd  Lieut.  William  J.  Conway  2nd  Lieut.  James  P.  O'Connell 


Frank  P.  Goffinet 
Raymond  Harrison 
Howard  Oliphant 
Arthur  E.  Schelper 
William  U.  Coughian 

Private — First  Class 
Christian  Goetzinger 


Privates 
Marshall  I.  Boarman 
James  Ford 
Williams  J.  Greenwald 
Howard  W.  Hoffman 
Cecil  C.  Lower\- 
Oran  S.  McMurray 
Samuel  N.  Morin 


1st  Sergeant  Elwood  Fuller 

Amo  W.  Reinhold 
George  H.  Rohling 
Bennie  H.  Schramm 
John  Schmitt 
Dewey  F.  Yates 
William  M.  Yohe 


212 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


'^j^^ai^sdUL.^ 


18th  AMMUNITION  TRAIN 


Captain  Jonas  A.  Benton 
Sergeant 
Edwin  W.  Brumm 

Corporals 

Horace  A.  Adkins 
Clayton  C.  GifiSn 
Sidney  T.  Searcy 


COMPANY  "C" 
1st  Lieut.  Justin  L.  Doyle  2nd  Lieut.  James  Drummond 


Private — First  Class 
James  W.  Knox 

Privates 

Chas.  C.  Anderson 
August  L.  Cableduc 
Felix  H.  Campbell 


Laurin  P.  Cofltey 
William  Eberle 
Prentice  E.  Gardner 
Walter  L.  Greer 
John  B.  Hoit 
Merlin  E.  Jones 
Frank  Kolasa 
Jesse  C.  Lindsey 


1st  Sergeant  Lynn  J.  Steincamp 

Gustav  E.  Mueller 
Lewis  Odell 
John  J.  Patterson 
John  H.  Posner 
Gary  E.  Purcell 
Edward  Roehrig 


Captain  Robert  L.  Kennedy 

Sergeant 
Perry  A.  Gillespie 

Corporals 

Chas.  C.  Bollinger 
Lester  A.  Dye 
John  L.  Griffis 


COMPANY  "D" 
2nd  Lieut.  Ralph  R.  Griebenow  2nd  Lieut.  John  D.  Mills,  Jr. 


Mechanic 
Edward  T.  Wood 
Privates — First  Class 
William  S.  Baglcy 
Carel  Moore 

Privates 
George  F.  BeU 


Michael  Cardamone 
James  A.  Cashion 
Russel  A.  Edwards 
Halbert  Farr 
Ira  GiU 

Grover  F.  Grosse 
Claude  H.  Holley 
James  W.  Jackson 
George  D.  Jermain 


Supply  Sergeant  Shad  Shelton 

William  H.  Kent 
Robert  L.  Lahey 
Ben  A.  Lamb 
Warren  E.  Livingston 
Heitz  B.  Moore 
Edgar  E.  Morris 
Henry  C.  Rattunde 
George  Tetlow 


1st  Lieut.  Charles  B.  Clarke 
2nd  Lieut.  George  C.  Coe 

Sergeant 
Samuel  H.  Currence 

Corporal 


Dee  Bray 

Cooks 
Archie  Roach 
Roy  Mawson 


COMPANY  "E" 

Captain  James  P.  William 

2nd  Lieut.  Roy  Gotthold  Mess  Sergeant  Daniel  A.  Snider 

1st  Sergeant  George  W.  Cunningham  Supply  Sergeant  William  H.  Miller 

Mechanic  Privates — First  Class  Privates 

Chas.  E.  Lemmler 
Horseshoer 


Carl  L.  Andersen 

Saddler 
Nikola  .\ndrich 


James  W.  Fogarty 
Rufus  H.  Kimbro 
Edwin  Pehl 
Emmitt  Sanders 
Theo.  P.  Thorton     ' 
Benjamin  H.  Vandevender 


Edward  Grordon 
Nile  F.  Smith 


Claude  B.  Steelman 


1st  Lieut.  John  C.  Stevens 

Sergeants 
Carl  Kennedy 
George  B.  Bosley 

Corporals 
Fred  E.  Denton 
Alvert  I.  Masters 


COMPANY  "F" 
Captain  Harry  J.  Hinck 
1st  Lieut.  William  H.  Ragsdale  2nd  Lieut.  James  M.  Conneally 

Wagoner 
John  E.  Lahay 
Bugler 


Chas.  H.  Smullen 
Chas.  R.  Spalding 


Cook 
Henry  C.  Pitts 

Mechanic 
Edward  S.  Van  Oss 


James  E.  Downing 

Privates — First  Class 
Frank  Bohler 


1st  Sergeant  Chas.  E.  Crawford 

Robert  O.  Franklin 
Owen  J.  Haney 
Abe  Richards 
Frank  B.  Willhite 


2nd  Lieut.  James  Wadman 
Sergeant 
Carroll  Stewart 

Corporals 
Peter  F.  Fairo 


COMPANY  "G" 
Captain  Ben  Davis  Locke 
2nd  Lieut.  Vernon  E.  Rankin  1st  Sergeant  Andrew  J.  Brown 


Henery  E.  Bryant 
Walter  H.  Fudge 
James  L.  Pate 

Horseshoer 
George  Albert 


Saddler 
Louis  G.  Zopf 

Wagoners 
Frank  M.  Ecker 
Herman  F.  Hellbusch 
Fritz  A.  Kunkel 


Supply  Sergeant  H.  E.  Smith 
William  F.  Young 

Privates — First  Class 
Marshall  Hartline 
Walter  McMasters 
Albert  E.  Winebrinnet 


[213] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


COMPANY  "A,"  18th  MILITARY  POLICE 


Captain  Charles  B.  Owen 
1st  Lieut.  Garleton  T.  Hennessey 


Captain  Ruel  E.  Davenport 
2nd  Lieut.  John  Mannix  First  Sergeant  Walter  E.  Walker 


Sergeants 

Fred  Boyd 

James  E.  Humphreys 
Thomas  E.  Kearney 
John  H.  Morgan 
Jeling  E.  Rolando 
Leonard  G.  Blackwood 

Corporals 

Lem  P.  Barkman 
David  S.  Kauffman 
James  H.  WeUs 

Privates— First  Class 

Frank  C.  Campbell 
George  W.  Case 


Orman  T.  Earnest 
Zachary  George 
Frank  A.  Jones 
WiUis  G.  Loftin 
Malcolm  J.  McDonald 
Simon  P.  McGuire 
Edward  F.  Mulhtrn 
Coy  Perkins 
Walter  B.  Seale 
Basil  Simmons 
Paul  M.  Sims 
Owen  Stapleton 
Silas  A.  Stephenson 
Luther  C.  Thomas 
Joseph  A.  Thompson 
Irvan  Walker 
Lee  R.  Watkins 
Dixon  Willis 


[214 


CAMP    TRAVISAND    THE     WORt.  D    WAR 


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[215] 


CAMP    TRAVIS     AND    THE     WORLD     WAR 


.       .'^^ 


t±±±±A 


18th  SANITARY  TRAIN 


1st  Lieut.  F.  M.  Miles,  S.C. 

2nd  Lieut.  Garth  C.  FuUer,  Q.M.C. 

Sergeant — First  Class 
Crisp  McMeans 

Sergeants 
Chester  H.  Kautz 
Irving  C.  McPherson 


HEADQUARTERS 
Major  E.  L.  Goar,  M.C. 


2nd  Lieut. 
2nd  Lieut. 


Richard  W.  Spear 
Percy  W.  Woolum 

Wagoner 
Herbert  Cowen 


Arthur  Van  Dercreek,  Q.M.C. 
Charles  Parrish,  V.C. 

Privates — First  Class 
Harold  M.  Johnson 

Privates 
Thomas  E.  Bogan 
Andrew  R.  Pool 


HEADQUARTERS  FIELD  HOSPITAL 

Captain  Frank  H.  Shaw 
Sergeant  Gustav  H.  Grothe 


FIELD  HOSPITAL  NO.  269 


Captain  Reuben  A.  Bogia,  M.C. 
Captain  Dana  O.  Norton,  M.C. 


Captain  W.  B.  Campbell,  M.C. 
1st  Lieut.  Wallace  P.  Martin,  M.C. 


Sergeants — First  Class 
Harry  Mott 
William  A.  Phelps 

Sergeants 
Hubbard  J.  Kent 
Everett  G.  Perry 
Edward  C.  Routh 
Willard  Stong 
Billie  C.  Bukowski 


Cooks 
Harry  L.  Goodall 
Steven  H.  Tackett 

Farrier 
William  J.  Clarkson 

Horseshoer 
Edgar  P.  Smith 
Mechanic 
Carl  F.  Hermann 


Privates — First  Class 
Bartholomew  Farrel 
James  J.  Gleeson 
Clarence  G.  Grenseman 
William  A.  Huffhines 
Charles  J.  Mares 
Chester  Tackett 

Privates 
.■\rthur  Y.  Alexander 


Frank  P.  .\nderson 
Liehugh  Baker 
Joseph  A.  Banks 
Clarence  W.  Berg 
James  F.  Campbell 
Albert  A.  Campbell 
William  L.  Carlstrom 
John  Christenson 
James  A.  Christy 
William  F.  Cook 


Phil  S.  Corkery 
Mathias  M.  Ditscheit 
Christ  S.  Kumbardus 
Francis  Major 
James  McNally 
Eduard  E.  Pauli 
Fred  G.  Schmeling 
John  Tucker 
Carroll  H.  Whitford 


FIELD  HOSPITAL  NO.  270 
Captain  Frank  H.  Shaw,  M.C.  Commanding 
Captain  Richard  E.  Shurtz,  M.C.         Captain  Clarence  L.  Miller,  M.C.         1st  Lieut.  Victor  M.  Longmire,  M.C. 


Sergeants — First  Class 

Grover  M.  Sullivan 
John  E.  Weeks 

Sergeants 

WiUiam  H.  Grubbs 
Walter  D.  Bevins 
Richard  J.  Crow 
Charles  P.  Jenkins 


Corporals 

Carl  H.  Hempelman 
Joseph  T.  Navitsky 
John  P.  Pena 
Cooks 
Otto  J.  Meotti 
Loyal  G.  Perry 
Mechanic 
William  C.  Garwood 


Privates — First  Class 

Matthew  Banks 
Sidney  E.  Duncan 
James  T.  Hinshaw 
Jacob  Lebsock 
John  W.  McCord 
Louis  V.  Olson 
David  A.  Stoops 


Privates 

Lawrence  W.  .\ndres 
Stephen  Arnoldy 
John  P.  Bradley 
John  J.  Brashear 
Albert  E.  Carlson 
Robert  O.  Carlson 
Robert  B.  Coffin 
Calogiro  A.  DiBuono 


Harry  A.  Erickson 
Herman  G.  Fowler 
Rocco  Gorgano 
Edwin  Headley 
James  V.  Kugler 
.\ddison  S.  McCandless 
Daniel  P.  McCorgary 
Wallace  E.  Newman 
Chris  A.  Olsen 
John  Remiszewski 


FIELD  HOSPITAL  No.  271 
1st  Lieut.  Frederick  A.  Blesse,  M.C.  Commanding 
1st  Lieut.  Silas  S.  Mohrman,  M.C.  1st  Lieut.  Vincent  J.  O'Conor,  M.C. 

1st  Sergeant  Frank  A.  Welch  ■  1st  Drill  Sergeant  Paul  VanKeuren  Supply  Sergeant  Oscar  H.  Epling 

Mess  Sergeant  Joseph  Smierzchalski 


Sergeants 

Elmer  A  Fisher 
Earl  B.  Shaw 
William  H.  Scott 


Corporal 
Royce  V.  Isely 


Cooks 

Ale.'c.  F.  Litza 
Nick  Kinzbach 

Privates — First  Class 
James  A.  Brown 
Robert  B.  Cleveland 
Halfred  W.  Elliott 
Steve  Kovar 


Stephen  E.  Marvin 
Robert  H.  Patrick 
Frank  S.  Plummer 
Harrison  Pruitt 
Andrew  Wierzbicki 
Wiliam  H.  Schmidt 
John  R.  Schroeder 
Ralph  J.  Sicher 
Claudie  B.  Woodrome 


Privates 

Cecil  D.  Barger 
James  E.  Bunker 
William  A.  Carson 
Gabriello  Dalpoggetto 
Harris  C.  Edds 
Simon  P.  Graf 
Charles  Headley 


Aaron  N.  Helms 
Henry  E.  Kennedy 
Emery  Leist 
David  R.  Morton 
Elmer  G.  Nordquist 
Thomas  R.  Reeves 
Walter  J.  Schultz 
Edward  J.  Ward 
Samuel  Watkins,  Jr. 


216] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


mpMpMI PMPWfH 


18th  SANITARY  TRAIN 


FIELD  HOSPITAL  No.  272 
1st  Lieut.  Bascom  H.  Palmer,  M.  C,  Commanding 
1st  Lieut.  John  J.  Minahan,  M.  C.  1st  Lieut.  Howard  H.  Webster,  M.C. 

1st  Sergeant  Ernest  P.  Johnson 


Sergeants — First  Class 

Carl  E.  Kennedy 
Simon  Magner 

Sergeants 
Raymond  C.  Odell 
Jesse  B.  Cimimins 
Joseph  T.  Walling 
.Xlexander  Pauley 
Walter  A.  Schultz 
Leo  L.  Cummings 


Corporals 
Charles  W.  Sullivan 
Thomas  H.  Tally 
Lester  H.  Seery 

Cooks 
Charles  D.  McClellon 
Gustaf  E.  Stromberg 

Mechanic 
John  A.  Palmer 


Privates — First  Class 
Glen  R.  Burchfield 
Lawrence  C.  Hann 
Harold  J.  Mathis 
Frank  E.  Morrow 
Earl  M.  Stake 

Privates 
Thomas  R.  Ackley 
.\rthur  A.  Buntrock 
Thomas  C.  Belden 


Elmer  C.  Castor 
Newton  C.  Cleghorn 
Clyde  Creason 
Charles  V.  Danielson 
Mike  Gubas 
Andrew  J.  Grey 
WiUiam  Griffiths 
John  M.  Hart 
Harm  E.  Henkel 
Robert  B.  Johnson 
Samuel  N.  Lotrean 


George  P.  O'Keefe 
Byrd  H.  Pinnell 
Galvin  T.  Rhoden 
Earl  Roper 
.•Vlex.  W.  Scheffler 
Joseph  F.  Sis 
Francis  L.  Werner 


HEADQUARTERS  AMBULANCE  SECTION 

Major  Francis  O.  Barrett 
Acting  Director,  Sergeant  John  J.  Mullen 


1st  Lieut.  H.  0.  Brown 


Sergeants — First  Class 
John  B.  Merryman 
William  F.  Chase 

Sergeants 
Lynus  J.  Parker 
Barnard  M.  Simmons 
Alvin  W.  Buckley 
George  T.  Nutter 
Russel  McLaucks 
Byron  W.  Ballantyne 
Fred  Reed 
George  A.  Swen 

Corporals 
.\llois  A.  Weinhold 
Henry  M.  Wampler 
Benjamin  W.  Kraus 


Cooks 
Herman  G.  Haack 
Edward  H.  Mosely 
Howard  L.  Smith 

Horseshoers 
Lem  D.  Barnard 
Roy  L.  Lansing 

Farrier 
Ermann  R.  Meeler 

Saddler 
Charles  Soukaetis 

Mechanic 

Willie  E.  Lowe 

Wagoners 

John  E.  Barber 


AMBULANCE  COMPANY  269 

1st  Lieut.  H.  Cammeron  May 

Harry  Beavers 
Welbom  F.  Broigitti 
Homer  J.  Bryant 
Purdee  E.  Byerly 
Albert  B.  Calvert 
Olof  M.  Clemenson 
Alfie  W.  Cooksey 
John  W.  Fletcher 
Edgar  L.  Lee 
Samuel  Moench 
Charles  Noske 
Jim  E.  Ripley 
Andrew  C.  Rogers 
Harry  W.  Siebert 
James  W.  Taylor 
AUen  C.  Ward 
Fred  Wendt,  Jr. 


1st  Lieut.  George  E.  Paullus 


Privates — First  Class 

William  Cogdell 
Roy  Cottrell 
Clarence  L.  Eberwein 
Earl  H.  Gholson 
Ward  H.  Lawrence 
Dan  Stockbridge 
Don  J.  Wadell 
Ralph  Wenzel 

Privates 

Eugene  C.  Adams 
Makis  Beneares 
Egista  Depoli 
Eugene  C.  Ellison 


Eric  O.  Ericson 
Richard  G.  Gundle 
Thomas  Healy 
Emmet  J.  Heisch 
Thomas  J.  Howells 
Walter  H.  Ludmg 
Roy  M.  Lund 
James  McCook 
Stephen  Mendock 
Nels  J.  Nelson 
Carpio  Padilla 
Fred  L.  Page 
Clyde  M.  Odom 
Lloyd  Robison 
Wallace  F.  Scripcavage 
Harold  K.  Rulon 
Fred  W.  Snyder 


Sergeants — First  Class 

Edward  Lacy 
Alfred  J.  Sanders 

Sergeants 
Chas.  E.  Armstrong 
Alfred  T.  Atkins 
Samuel  Bishop 
James  E.  Jones 
Glen  N.  McGrady 
Corbett  Shultz 


AMBULANCE  COMPANY  270 

Major  Francis  O.  Barrett,  M.  C,  Commanding 
Capt.  E.  Jamieson,  M.  C.  1st  Lieut.  Treau  P.  Lynch,  M.  C. 


Corporals 

Jesse  AUdredge 
Leslie  C.  Sheppard 
Alto.  Stevenson 
Paul  E.  Tech 


Cooks 

Roger  M.  Binker 
John  D.  Miller 
Albert  Woodard 


Mechanic 
William  E.  Schultz 
Privates — First  Class 

Arthur  J.  Beachner 
Foulton  Y.  Faulkner 
Robert  C.  Fretwell 
John  H.  Hegemann 
William  M.  Hamilton 
Harry  H.  Hoffman 
Edward  Marmaro 

Continued  on  page  310 


Privates 

Harvey  B.  Brooks 
Ervin  C.  Daniels 
Henry  C.  Disney 
James  Dunbar 
Perry  A.  England 
Chas.  M.  Fanshire 
John  H.  Griffin 
Harry  A.  Hayden 
Herman  J.  Head 
Earl  Henderson 


Dock  M.  Hutchens 
William  P.  Leach 
Oscar  S.  McDonald 
Knute  W.  Nelson 
Earl  E.  Randies 
Pedro  Silva 
Uel  B.  Smith 
Ezeiquel  Suazo 
John  W.  Walsh 
Houston  I.  Wheeler 
William  G.  Witte 
Everett  N.  Wrinkle 


[217: 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


1st  Lieut.  J.  D.  Mclver 

Sergeants 
M.  A.  Gilboy 
J.  A.  Damptz 
Ed.  Allen 


Sergeants 

James  C.  Barnes 
Karl  F.  Bley 
Frederick  A.  Brown 
Herman  A.  Eiben 
Swan  L.  Larson 
Henry  L.  Schawe 


Sergeants 

Earl  C.  Conners 
Francis  Limberger 

Corporals 

Chas.  Denlin 
Homer  H.  Mann 


18th  SUPPLY  TRAIN 
COMPANY  "A" 
Captain  Rowland  G.  Taylor 
2nd  Lieut.  O.  L.  Mize  First  Class  Sergeant  F.  W.  Hall 


Corporals 
D.  P.  Finn 
W.  W.  Lee 
W.  M.  LeRoy 
J.  E.  Marrion 
H.  Prado 


Wagoner 
C.  F.  Smith 

Privates — First  Class 
E.  A.  Bender 
C.  D.  Bixler 


Supply  Sergeant  C.  R.  Arrick 

C.  H.  Koch 
F.  L.  Lamb 

Privates 
L.  D.  Briggs 
R.  G.  Parshall 


COMPANY  "B,"  18th  SUPPLY  TRAIN 
2nd  Lieut.  Herbert  J.  Flaherty  First  Class  Sergeant  Alvin  M.  Vaughter 


Corporals 

Howard  A.  .'Vmbron 
Raymond  L.  Chaney 
John  G.  Faust 
V.  Kenneth  Galey 
Woody  Greenwell 
Paul  J.  Hayes 
Robert  V.  Henn 

COMPANY  "C,' 

2nd  Lieut.  Joseph  J.  Beatty 

John  H.  Peipenhagen 
Frank  Sowasky 
Jacob  Toepfer 
E.  P.  Barber 
Frank  Holubec 

Privates — First  Class. 
Carl  O.  Benson 


Frank  F.  Hirsch 
Grover  C.  Jones 
Leslie  L.  Knox 
Henry  Kurtzmann 
Henry  W.  Manz 
Paul  G.  Maeding 
Shirley  S.  Marten 
Edward  E.  Merzdorf 
Arthur  M.  McCarthy 

ISth  SUPPLY  TRAIN 

2nd  Lieut.  Wm.  F.  Biddison 

Robert  R.  Cameron 
Bryant  S.  Cronk 
Jolin  Danzinger 
Pleas  E.  Dye 
Walter  L.  James 
Joseph  M.  Novak 
Walter  L.  Plumer 
Hoy  E.  Phipps 


Edmund  Neva 
James  F.  Pleming 
Earle  W.  Reeves 

Cook 
Charles  Spiegel 

Private — First  Class 
Earl  J.  Ward 


Wm.  A.  Schuetze 
John  B.  Stewart 
Eugene  F.  Wheeler 
Jephtha  P.  Wilson 
Trueman  E.  Smith 

Bugler 

Joseph  A.  Preston 


218  1 


CAMP    TRAVIS    AND    THE     WORI.  D    WAR 


18th  SUPPLY  TRAIN 

COMPANY 

"D" 

2nd  Lieut.  J.  M.  Thompson 

2nd  Lieut.  Carl  E.  Chaddick 

Sergeants 

Corporals 

Chas.  A.  Frobish 
Woody  Greenwell 

Privates 
Robert  Haile 

Tom  0.  McCoy 

William  J.  Wetzel 

Herbert  A.  McClaugherty 

Robert  Graver 

Martin  L.  Rullman 

Michael  Sutner 

J.  Ciconascolo 

Shigley 

Clifford  V. .  Harrow 

Cook 

Rouss  Eastham 

I.  P.  Palmer 

Loy  M.            ;11 

Geo.  I.  Sims 

Floyd  S.  Ellison 

Clarence  Willis 

Frank  Hciuucc 

Henry  Gierke 

Gus  B.  Henderson 

Ewell  P.  Barber 

Mechanic 

Martin  L.  Dyer 

Charlie  I.  Taylor 

Paul  F.  Amling 

Andrew  M.  Jones 

COMPANY  "E," 

'  18th  SUPPLY  TRAIN 

2ndJLieut.  George  E.  Turner 

First  Class  Sergeant  Samuel  H.  Thompson 

Sergeants 

Corporals 

Roy  Tyler 
William  R.  Wagner 

Floyd  Chase 
John  J.  Conroy 

Raymond  W.  Clyde 
David  J.  Casler 

John  P.  Foran 
Lloyd  M.  Fowler 

Privates— First  Class 

Jose  G.  Garza 
Robert  G.  Merkle 

Steven  J.  Cross 

Edward  P.  Hofman 

Harlow  Seaton 

G.  L.  Newman 

Weldon  K.  Knowles 

Raymond  E.  Johnson 

Fred  H.  Brundridge 

Paul  Patterson 

John  C.  McCollum 

Charles  Patterson 

David  J.  Cadwallader 

Walter  G.  Steffler 

Me\er  Schwartz 

Julius  0.  Sheffield 

Ray  W.  Chandler 

Harry  Teagle 

COMPANY  "F," 

18th 

SUPPLY  TRAIN 

2ndXieut.  Arthur  Weesely 

2nd  Lieut.  Harry  Butler 

Sergeants 

Corporals 

Privates— First  Class 

Willie  W.  McCandless 
Bohumil  J.  Novy 

V'alentine  E.  Lidecker 

Maximilian  Dupuoy 

Evarv  J.  Broussard 

Privates 

Leo  J.  Bright 

Edward  E.  Dressener 

Jay  C.  Ellis 

Tohn  M.  Fawcett 

Melvin  K.  Ga>mon 

Eber  L.  Harris 

Paul  L.  Pfyffer 

blaf  E.  E.  Stromberg 

Frank  J.  Litz 

Henry  Whittle 

219 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


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[220] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


HKAUQUARTERS  DETACHMENT,   ISth   UIVISION 


Frank  J.  Connelly 

Hospital  Sergeant 

James  H.  Hatch 

Regimental  Sergeant  Majors 

Claude  Bell 
Wilbur  Evans 
Harold  E.  Hess 

Battalion  Sergeant  Majors 

Clifford  Harry 
Stanley  McMurtiie 
Joseph  Murrin 

Sergeants — First  Class 

Clifford  L.  Anderson 
Kirby  A.  Bussey 
Clvde  Boston 
Phillip  Bedore 
Sherman  Baker 


American  Field  Clerks 
M.  N.  Kaplan  S  W.  Fenn 


Ben  Lichtenstein 


Pelham  Converse 
Robert  Clinton 
Elliot  Tucker 
Ellis  Holbert 
Thomas  E.  Koggin 
Elmo  E.  Sneger 

Sergeants 

Mark  Collier 
Leggeth  Carroll 
Sam  Engel 
Walter  Hallmark 
Ovide  Isabelle 
Marvin  Jones 
Clyde  Kennon 
Joe  R.  Nash 
Emmitt  Presnall 
Elliot  Seeligson 
Ross  Staley 


Corporals 

Oscar  A.  Anderson 
Lawrence  Bentley 
Albert  Breyer 
Henry  Bracks 
Victor  Carpenter 
Maurice  Leahy 
Samuel  Martin 
William  Miles 
Thomas  W.  Reilly 

Privates — First  Class 

William  J.  Breckenridge 
Ffed  Boggs 
Harold  Caruthers 
Miguel  Cisneros 
Abe  Eckhart 
Hubert  E.  Vineyard 
Cooper  E.  Wvatt . 


James  Keefe 
Donald  B.  Laverett 
Chester  H.  Shiflet 

Privates 

Frank  Beuton 
Grade  Calloway 
Jackson  B.  Edwards 
Herbert  Murphy 
Ronald  Verberne 
Knut  E.  Westerlind 
Sam  Wood 
Walter  Johnson 
John  J.  Kennedy 
Gustave  M.  Lange 
James  E.  Porter 
Olmond  L.  Poultry 
Leonard  Sitterle 
Myles  Thomas 


221 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


BAKERY  COMPANY  NO.  375 


1st  Lieut.  Thomas  R.  Movie 
2nd  Lieut,  .\lbert  G.  Smith  Quartermaster  Sergeant  Thomas  L.  Evert 


Sergeants 

Lawrence  M.  Schomburger 
V'ernon  R.  King 
Milton  R.  Hardwick 
Lawrence  J.  Burch 
James  B.  Walden 
Earl  A.  .Ackley 
Ernest  J.  Roth 
Rub  Humphrey 
Italo  Martinelli 
Edward  V.  Wise 
William  E.  Southern 
William  L.  Zone 
Robert  Damron 
George  M.  Frederick 
Alfred  G.  Dietzel 
Charlie  G.  Holzwonh 
Duke  C.  Edge 
Lonnie  E.  Ferrell 
Clarence  Frederick 
Robert  Burnett 
Horace  O.  Beckham 

Corporals 

Carl  L.  Beene 
Warren  C.  White 
Harrj-  O.  Moore 
-\lbert  L.  Johnson 
James  Rourke 


Lee  M.  Gotcher 
James  A.  Roberson 
Patrick  J.  Corbett 
Roger  Council 
Albert  W.  Griffin 
Ray  Lemmons 
Thomas  J.  James 
Travis  S.  Connor 

Cooks 

John  C.  Deacon 
Ong  C.  Wong 

Privates — First  Class 

James  H.  Birkes 
Joe  Bridges 
Joe  \.  Carson 
Joe  J.  Caufal 
Henry  .\.  Clark 
Jesse  C.  Elliott 
WiUiam  H.  Fant 
John  W.  Ferrell 
.\lbert  F.  Finney 
Hughlon  Foshee 
Roy  Foster 
Eanes  Garrett 
Marshall  P.  Gresham 
Jesse  B.  Hardwick 
WiUiam  T.  Harris 


Durward  B.  Hawpe 
William  W.  Hortman 
Joe  Kavecki 
Fred  Koch 
Cortez  A.  McDaniel 
John  Offield 
Clarence  R.  Parish 
Henry  Russell 

Privates 
Jasper  .\tkinson 
Leonard  R.  .\shton 
James  B.  Carroll 
Sam  F.  Felkner 
Max  A.  Floerke 
Frank  H.  Friday 
John  E.  Hill 
Loy  J.  Hairston 
Frank  Hladik 
Walter  D.  Johnson 
Johnnie  C.  Knott 
Fritz  C.  Letterman 
William  A.  Long 
Charlie  Monschke 
John  M.  Moore 
Dinks  H.  Pitts 
Theodorus  Uianakopolos 
Gus  Volos 

Wilbur  W.  WaUerstedt 
Hugh  L.  Winger 


222] 


A  NEW  NAME  ON  THE 
ARMY  ROSTER,  THE  HOME 
OF  HARD  WORK  AND 
PERSONAL  SACRIFICE  AND 
THE  FOUNDATION  OF 
OUR     MILITARY     SUCCESS 


The  165th  Depot  Brigade 


Organized   August  Twenty-ninth, 
Nineteen  Hundred  and  Seventeen 


Brigadier   General   George   O.    Cress,    Commanding 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


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CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


THE  165th  DEPOT  BRIGADE 

A  Great  Machine  Which  Made  Misfits  Fit,  Banished  Ignorance 
and  Trained  Thousands  of  Fighting  Men 


THE  One  Hundred  and  Sixty-fifth  Depot  Brigade  was 
organized  August  29,  1918,  pursuant  to  General 
Order  No.  109,  War  Department,  August  16,,  1917. 
The  purpose  and  function  of  this  Depot  Brigade  was  to 
receive  recruits  sent  by  the  various  draft  boards,  clothe 
them,  feed  and  house  them  and  give  them  the  various 
physical  examinations  and  inoculations  segregating  the 
unfit  and  contacts,  and  assigning  the  fit  men  to  training 
battalions;  to  prepare  all  the  preliminary  records,  make 
occupational  and  professional  classification  of  men  under 
supervision  of  the  Camp  Personnel 
Office;  to  organize  development  bat- 
talions for  the  purpose  of  rendering 
fit  those  men  found  temporarily  unfit 
for  military  duty;  the  assignment, 
distribution  and  shipping  of  men  to 
organizations  and  stations  under  or- 
ders from  the  War  Department  and 
to  give  such  basic  training  to  the 
recruit  as  time,  circumstances  and 
the  exigencies  of  service  permitted. 

The  tables  of  organization  pro- 
vided for  brigade  headquarters  with 
a  brigadier  general  in  command, 
"whose  duties  were  the  general  super- 
vision and  command  of  the  brigade. 

The  brigade  was  organized  into 
groups  of  six  battalions  each,  these 
groups  being  commanded  by  a  colo- 
nel, whose  duties  consisted  of  that 
of  instructor.  He  had  general  super- 
vision of  the  instructing  and  train- 
ing of  his  group.  The  group  com- 
mander of  six  battaUons  exercised 
no  administrative  functions  as  are 
ordinarily  exercised  by  regimental 
commanders. 

These  groups  of  six  battalions  were 
sub-divided  into  two  groups  of  three 
battalions  each  commanded  by  a  lieu- 
tenant colonel  who  served  as  an  as- 
sistant instructor  to  the  colonel  of  his 
double  group.  The  lieutenant  colo- 
nel exercised  no  administrative  func- 
tions as  are  ordinarily  exercised  in 
a  regiment  of  three  battalions. 

The  battalions  consisted  of  a  battalion  headquarters 
which  was  composed  of  the  major,  the  adjutant,  the  supply 
officer  and  ten  enlisted  men,  and  four  companies  composed 
of  six  officers  and  250  enlisted  men.  The  function  of  all 
of  the  battalion  officers  was  peculiar  by  nature  to  a  Depot 
Brigade  in  addition  to  all  the  other  duties  called  for  in  a 
regimental  organization. 

Introducing  the  Well-Known  "Bull  Pen"  and 
a  Few  Forms  and  Examinations 

The  local  board  having  selected  the  quota  of  the  recruits 
to  the  National  Army,  one  of  that  number,  a  reliable  man, 
is  placed  in  charge  and  is  responsible  for  induction  papers 
and  for  their  safe  arrival  at  the  mobilization  camp.  The 
papers  consist  of  Forms  1010  P.  M.  G.  O.,  and  1029 
P.  M.  G.  O.  (A  and  B).  Form  1010  P.  M.  G.  O.  is  a 
record  of  the  physical  condition  of  the  recruit  upon  induc- 
tion by  the  local  board,  also,  the  physical  condition  of  the 


BRIG.  GEN.  GEORGE  0.  CRESS 
Commanding  165th  Depot  Brigade 

Graduated  from  West  Point,  1884;  assigned 
Seventh  Cavalry;  Philippines,  1899-1901;  War 
College,  1910-1911;  Major,  Tenth  Cavalry, 
1911;  Philippines,  1913-1915  with  Eighth  Cav- 
alry; promoted  Colonel,  July,  1916;  Inspector 
General's  Department;  Division  Inspector, 
Mexican  Punitive  Expedition;  Colonel,  306th 
Cavalry,  National  Army;  Colonel,  Forty-ninth 
Field  Artillery;  Fort  Sill  School  of  Fire,  1918; 
promoted  Brigadier-General,  October  1,  1918; 
assigned  to  165th  Depot  Brigade,  November 
22,  1918. 


recruit  at  the  mobilization  camp.  Form  1029  P.  M.  G.  O. 
(A  and  B)  is  a  duplicate  postal  card  which  is  an  acknowl- 
edgment to  the  local  board  and  a  notification  of  the  re- 
cruit's arrival,  which  is  sent  to  the  Provost  Marshal 
General,  Washington,  D.  C. 

In  the  event  that  there  are  a  number  of  county  quotas 
on  one  train  and  the  total  number  of  recruits  is  over  fifty, 
the  cars  are  switched  out  to  the  camp;  if  less  than  fifty,  the 
recruits  are  met  at  the  railroad  station  by  non-commis- 
sioned officers  detailed  for  the  purpose,  and  sent  to  the 
camp  by  trucks,  being  delivered  di- 
rectly to  the  Receiving  Station,  in 
the  latter  case.  In  the  former  case 
the  train  is  met  by  one  officer  and 
three  non-commissioned  officers  and 
an  officer  of  the  Medical  Corps  to 
take  charge  of  the  detraining  and 
marching  of  the  men  to  the  Receiv- 
ing Station.  The  recruits  are  held 
on  the  train  until  the  medical  officer 
has  made  an  inspection  to  ascertain 
whether  there  is  any  sickness,  con- 
tagious or  otherwise.  If  he  finds  any 
man  who  is  not  feeling  well,  he  gives 
him  a  hurried  examination  to  deter- 
mine the  extent  of  the  illness  and 
whether  it  is  contagious;  if  the  ill- 
ness is  serious  the  man  is  sent  to 
the  Base  Hospital  direct,  by  ambu- 
lance; if  the  §ickness  is  contagious 
the  man  is  sent  to  the  Base  Hospital 
and  the  remainder  of  the  recruits  in 
that  part  of  the  car  are  placed  under 
quarantine.  The  medical  inspection 
having  been  completed,  the  men  are 
instructed  to  detrain  and  form  in 
column  of  fours  on  the  station  plat- 
form, the  men  of  the  quarantine  car 
being  kept  separate.  The  recruits 
are  then  marched  to  the  Receiving 
Station  where  every  man  receives  a 
physical  examination,  superficial 
only,  of  the  throat  and  chest,  and  in 
the  event  of  a  contagious  disease  de- 
veloping, necessitating  quarantine, 
the  men  of  his  county  quota  are 
quarantined,  it  being  taken  for  granted  that  those  men 
have  probably  been  exposed.  This  initial  examination 
having  been  accomplished  the  recruits  are  attached  by 
county  to  the  various  companies  having  available  space, 
for  quarters  and  rations  until  called  for  by  the  Receiving 
Station.  It  has  been  found  from  experience  that  keeping 
the  county  quotas  intact  facilitates  the  keeping  of  records. 
The  men  who  have  been  placed  under  quarantine  are  at- 
tached in  companies  designated  as  contact  companies. 
If  the  men  are  hungry,  they  are  given  a  meal  at  the  casual 
kitchen,  run  in  conjunction  with  the  Receiving  Station, 
before  being  sent  to  their  temporary  organizations. 

The  next  day,  or  as  soon  thereafter  as  practicable,  the 
men  are  called  back  to  the  Receiving  Station  by  counties 
for  their  physical  examination  and  assignment,  bringing 
with  them  all  their  belongings,  as  it  is  improbable  that 
they  will  be  assigned  to  the  same  company  to  which  they 
were  attached.  The  forms  1010  P.  M.  G.  0.  are  then 
checked  against  the  men  by  name  and  held  until  after  the 


[225] 


CAMP    TRAVIS     AND     THE     WORLD     WAR 


STAFF  AND  FIELD  OFFICERS— THIRD  GROUP,  165th  DEPOT  BRIGADE 

Seated— Left  to  Right: 

1st  Lieut.  Jack  S.  Dewar,        Capt.  Henry  Nanton,        Major  Felix  Kerrick,        Lieut.  Col.  Rawson  Warren, 

Major  Goodridge  B.  Wilson,        Major  Joseph  A.  Hudson,        Capt.  Robert  G.  Gresham 

Standing — Left  to  Right 

1st  Lieut.  Fred  G.  Dickson,  IstLieut.  Franz  J.Schulte,  Chaplain  Wm.  C.  House,   2nd  Lieut.  Frank  W.  Gill,   2ndLieut.  Henry  P.  Callahan, 

1st  Lieut.  Chas.  E.  Smeltz,     Chaplain  James  T.  Bloom,     1st  Lieut.  Fred.  L.  Gilliam,     1st  Lieut.  Earle  H.  Bolinger. 


men  have  had  their  bath.  The  first  step  is  to  deposit  any 
valuables  in  envelopes  on  which  their  name  and  county 
is  placed.  Recruits  then  pass  into  the  next  room  and 
strip  ofiE  their  clothes  which  are  bundled  up  for  them. 
The  Y.  M.  C.  A.  takes  charge  of  their  clothes,  if  they  wish 
to  send  them  home;  but  if  they  feel  that  they  have  no 
further  use  for  them  they  may  give  them  to  the  Red  Cross. 
In  either  case  the  clothes  are  held  until  the  recruit  has 
been  accepted  or  rejected,  as  the  result  of  his  physical 
examination.  The  first  examination,  after  they  have 
disposed  of  their  clothes,  is  to  discover  any  symptoms  of  a 
venereal  disease.  If  the  man  is  found  to  have  a  venereal 
disease  he  is  marked  on  the  back  with  a  crayon,  and  in 
any  event  he  passes  on  to  the  bath  house,  where  he  receives 
a  piece  of  soap  and  takes  a  bath.  He  then  is  given  a 
towel  and  dries  himself  and  moves  on  to  a  desk  where  he 
receives  his  Form  1010  P.  M.  G.  O.  and  a  ticket  which  he 
hangs  around  his  neck.  The  tickets  of  venereals  are 
marked  with  a  cross  at  the  desk  also,  and  a  Form  88 
S.  G.  O.  (M.  D.)  which,  when  fully  accomplished  shows 
the  physical  condition  of  the  recruit,  is  started.  He  then 
moves  on  to  the  tubercular  board  and  is  given  a  thorough 
examination  for  tuberculosis,  the  results  of  which  are 
entered  on  his  Form  88  S.  G.  0.  and  the  man  marked  on 
the  chest  with  a  crayon.  The  next  examination  is  by  the 
neuro-psychiatric  board.  Recruits  here  are  examined  in 
groups  of  four  or  five  and  results  are  entered  on  the  Form 
88  S.  G.  O.,  as  is  every  other  branch  of  the  physical  examin- 
ation. He  is  then  measured  and  weighed,  his  teeth  are 
examined  and  the  next  step  is  an  examination  by  the 
orthojjedic  board,  on  which  great  stress  is  laid.     From 


there  he  passes  to  the  surgeons,  who  examine  him  for 
hemorrhoids,  hernia,  varicocele,  syphilis,  etc.;  the  causes 
of  any  scars  which  he  may  have  on  his  body  are  also 
ascertained.  His  fingerprints  are  taken  on  Form  260 
A.  G.  0.,  then  the  oculist,  nose  and  throat  specialists,  and 
cardio  vascular  board  make  their  examinations.  His 
physical  examination  having  been  completed,  the  results 
shown  by  his  Form  88  S.  G.  O.  are  checked  to  determine 
whether  the  recruit  meets  the  standards,  physically,  for 
acceptance  into  the  army,  and  if  not,  he  is  sent  to  the 
special  board  of  medical  examiners,  which  decides  whether 
the  recruit  meets  the  standard  and  is  to  be  retained  or  is 
to  be  rejected.  If  the  recruit  is  rejected  his  civilian 
clothes  are  returned  to  him  and  his  final  statements  and 
discharge  from  the  service  completed.  If  the  recruit  is 
accepted  he  passes  on  to  the  Quartermaster's  OflSce  for  his 
clothes. 

From  his  form  1010  P.  M.  G.  O.  his  name  is  entered  on 
his  Form  637  A.  G.  O.  (clothing  sUp),  and  his  barrack 
bag  is  given  him,  in  which  has  already  been  placed  two 
blankets,  bed  sack,  mess  kit,  and  he  is  given  his  under- 
wear, socks,  O.  D.  uniform,  shoes,  belt,  leggins,  hat,  hat 
cord,  etc.,  which  he  puts  on  before  leaving  the  Quarter- 
master Office.  He  signs  his  Form  637  A.  G.  O.  on  which 
these  articles  are  charged. 

Having  a  complete  outfit  of  clothing,  he  passes  on  to  the 
enlistment  board,  which  makes  out  his  Form  22-2  A.  G.  O. 
which  shows  place  of  induction,  former  service,  person  to 
be  notified  in  case  of  death,  place  of  birth  and  is  witnessed 
by  the  personnel  adjutant.  The  next  step  is  the  ac- 
complishment of  Form  C.  C.  P.  1,  which  is  the  qualifica- 


226] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


tion  card.  Here  the  recruit  sits  down  at  the  table  and  is 
interviewed  by  an  enlisted  man  in  regard  to  his  education 
and  occupation  in  civil  life,  and  is  asked  his  years  of  ex- 
pyerience  in  the  line  of  work  he  followed,  the  branch  of 
service  he  desires,  birth,  parentage,  nationality,  etc. 
Having  completed  the  vocational  examination,  his  in- 
surance Form  2A  and  allotment  Form  IB  are  accom- 
plished by  a  board  of  enlisted  men  who  have  been  es- 
p>ecially  instructed  in  matters  of  war  risk  insurance  and 
allotment.  The  men  are  then  gathered  together  by 
counties  as  they  pass  from  this  last  board.  The  examina- 
tions of  the  recruits  having  been  completed,  his  Form 
1010  P.  H.  G.  O.  to  which  have  been  attached  his  Forms 
260  A.  G.  O.  (fingerprints),  22-2  (enlistment  and  assign- 
ment), 88  S.  G.  O.  (physical),  637  A.  G.  O.  (clothing), 
2A  (insurance),  IB  (allotment),  and  C.  C.  P.  1  (qualifica- 
tion), are  collected  and  kept  by  county  quotas  and  the 
men  are  grouped  by  county  quotas  as  to  venereals  and 
non-venereals.  Ujwn  the  completion  of  the  quota,  the 
recruits  are  inoculated  for  para-typhoid-  and  vaccinated 
for  smallpox,  this  data  being  entered  on  Form  81  S.  G.  O. 
(M.  D.)  and  are  ready  for  assignment  to  a  company. 
The  recruits  are  then  assigned  to  companies  according  to 
the  space  report  submitted  by  company  commanders. 
The  recruits  are  sent  to  the  company  in  charge  of  an 
orderly  who  is  given  a  slip  in  duplicate,  showing  the  date 
and  number  of  company,  name  of  the  county  and  the 
number  of  men  in  the  county  quota,  which  he  presents  to 
the  company  commander  for  a  receipt,  keeping  the 
original,  giving  the  duplicate  to  the  company  commander 


as  a  record.  When  the  orderly  returns,  the  chart  on  the 
assignment  desk  is  checked,  showing  space.  The  vene- 
reals are  assigned  to  a  development  company,  for  venereal? 
only. 

The  recruits  having  been  assigned  to  a  company,  are 
given  no  work  for  a  period  of  seventy-two  hours,  that  the 
least  possible  amount  of  sickness  will  result  from  the  inoc- 
ulations. The  seventy-two  hour  period  having  elapsed, 
the  recruits  are  given  their  next  initial  instruction  in  the 
fundamental  of  military  life.  This  period  consists  of  froir. 
two  to  four  weeks.  During  this  period  of  initial  instruc- 
tion the  service  records  are  accomplished  from  the  data  od 
Form  1010  P.  M.  G.  O.  and  the  forms  attached  thereto 
by  the  personnel  branch  of  the  Adjutant  General'.' 
Department. 

The  draft  having  been  completed  after  about  five  days, 
the  vocational  board  of  the  personnel  branch  of  the  Ad- 
jutant General's  Department  makes  consolidated  repon 
to  Washington  of  the  number  of  men  in  various  vocations 
and  the  number  of  men  of  various  vocations  are  consoli- 
dated with  the  reports  from  all  camps  in  the  country  anc 
the  Adjutant  General's  Department,  Washington,  requi 
sitions  the  men  according  to  their  qualifications  and  orders 
them  shipped  to  the  points  where  they  can  be  best  user 
or  given  further  instruction  in  their  particular  trade. 

The  companies  having  received  these  requisitions  coro 
plete  their  service  record  which  they  have  received  in  th« 
meantime  from  the  personnel  branch,  and  send  the  men 
to  the  infirmary  for  another  physical  examination.  This 
physical    examination   is  equally  as  important  as   th« 


OFFICERS— 8TH  BATTALION,  165TH  DEPOT  BRIG4DE 


First  row  seated 
1st  Lieut.  John  L.  Nash 
Capt.  John  G.  Blanchard 
Capt.  Woodie  R.  Gilbert 
Major  Goodrid?e  B.  Wilson 
1st  Lieut.  Fred  L.  Gilliam 
1st  Lieut.  E.  H.  Bolinger 
Capt.  E.  W.  Peterson 


First  row  standing 
2nd  Lieut.  H.  G.  Satterlee 
1st  Lieut.  W.  E.  Hicks 
2nd  Lieut.  Jesse  R.  Link 
2nd  Lieut.  Joe  Patton 
2nd  Lieut.  G.  H.  Dunlevy 
2nd  Lieut.  E.  A.  Maska 
2nd  Lieut.  Vemie  E.  Taylor 


Second 

row  standing 

2nd  Lieut. 

R.  R.  Landrum 

2nd  Lieut. 

George  Schwartz 

2nd  Lieut. 

H.  H.  MacKenzie 

2nd  Lieut. 

G.  Seibel 

2nd  Lieut. 

E.  G.  Lloyd 

2nd  Lieut. 

H.  C.  Eliason 

2271 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


OFFICERS— 9th  BATTALION,  16oth  DEPOT  BRIGADE 


1st  row,  bottom — left  to  right 
2nd  Lieut.  Julius  L.  Lohoefer 
1st  Lieut.  Charles  E.  Smeltz 
Major  Joseph  A.  Hudson 
2nd  Lieut.  Henry  P.  Callahan 
2nd  Lieut.  Arthur  Kail 


2nd  row — left  to  right 
Capt.  Waiiam  C.  Mitchell 
Chaplain  J.  T.  Bloom 
1st  Lieut.  Charles  R.  Wakefield 
Capt.  Martin  J.  Burelbach 
Gapt.  Otto  E.  Pentz 


3rd  row — ^left  to  right 
2nd  Lieut.  Ragsdale  McNeill 
2nd  Lieut.  M.  McMorris 
2nd  Lieut.  James  B.  Nourse 
2nd  Lieut.  James  D.  Marshall 


4th  row — ^left  to  right 
2nd  Lieut.  George  F.  Holdenild 
2nd  Lieut.  Clarence  H.  Dalley 
2nd  Lieut.  O.  P.  McWhister 
2nd  Lieut.  James  B.  McBraun 


examination  for  acceptance.  Many  men  come  to  the 
camp  and  in  their  physical  examination  for  acceptance 
pass  as  Class  A  men,  but  after  two  or  three  weeks  of 
drill,  although  only  the  fundamental,  latent  troubles  ap- 
pear, the  result  of  former  injury  and  disease  which  in  civil 
life  were  apparently  cured,  come  to  light.  Those  who  can 
be  cured  are  sent  to  the  development  battaUon  and  those 
who  cannot  be  cured  are  sent  before  a  special  medical 
board  for  discharge.  It  is  a  fact  that  seventeen  percent, 
of  2,500  who  were  originally  accepted  at  the  Receiving 
Station  as  Class  A  men  have,  after  two  or  three  weeks 
of  military  training,  been  found  tmfit  for  overseas  duty. 

In  this  manner  thousands  of  recruits  of  the  National 
Army  have  been  accepted  or  rejected. 

Making  the  Soldier  Fit  to  Fight  is  the  Special 
Task  of  the  Development  Battalions 

The  man  was  doubled  up  over  the  table  of  the  mess  hall 
painfully  copying  words  from  a  book  spread  out  before 
him.  He  grasped  the  pencil  with  an  imaccustomed, 
labored  hand,  and  plowed  through  his  work  with  dogged 
determination.  In  his  eyes  were  the  "do-or-die"  spirit, 
and  the  very  curve  of  his  back  bespoke  tenacity  and  the 
will  to  accomplish  and  succeed. 

"Why  don't  you  write  a  letter?  " 

At  the  voice  behind  him,  the  man  dropped  his  pencil 
and  turned  around.  He  smiled  apologetically,  covered  up 
his  writing  with  his  book,  dropped  his  eyes.  Then  he 
looked  up  at  his  questioner: 

"Why.  I  ain't  ever  writ  a  letter,"  he  said. 


"How  long  have  you  been  in  the  army?"  came  the  kind 
voice  again. 

"Eight  months,  sir." 

"Have  you  any  family?" 

"I  gotta  wife  in  San  Angelo." 

"Have  you  ever  written  to  her?" 

"  She  writes  to  me,  sir,  but  I  ain't  never  writ  to  her.     I 

couldn't  write  when  I  came  inter  the  Army,  and  now " 

bashfully,  uncomfortably, "  Why  I  wouldn't  know  what  ter 
say." 

Then  Mr.  Spencer — for  the  questioner  was  Cuthbert 
Spencer,  who  has  charge  of  the  educational  work  in  the 
Southern  Department  Development  Group,  commanded 
by  Major  James  T.  Rountree,  sat  down  beside  the  man. 
He  explained  that  a  letter  is  simply  a  written  message  from 
one  friend  to  another  and  that  if  the  man  could  send  a 
verbal  message  to  his  wife  he  could  as  easily  write  one. 
Result,  a  letter,  the  very  first  letter  that  the  man  had  ever 
written  in  his  life. 

"If  you  could  have  seen  that  man  when  he  finished," 
said  Mr.  Spencer,  "you  would  appreciate  more  fully  and 
gratefully  what  the  Government  is  doing  in  its  develop- 
ment battalions,  and  how  it  is  opening  up  a  new  life  and 
a  fuller  one  to  those  men.  You  have  never  seen  any  one 
so  pleased  as  this  man.  He  had  discovered  a  new  con- 
tinent, a  new  world,  endless  vistas  were  opened  up  before 
him.  His  weeks  of  drudgery  learning  to  read  and  write 
in  the  battalion  classes  were  all  repaid.  His  whole  aspect 
was  changed.    He  went  out  a  difiFerent  man." 

He  is  just  one  man  in  one  development  battalion.  Al- 
ready throughout  the  United  States,  there  are  fifty-one 
of  these  battalions  organized  for  the  work  of  developing 


[228] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


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229 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


for  greater  usefulness  men  in  the  army  who  fall  below  the 
higher  standards  of  army  life.  Approximately  100,000 
men  are  being  built  up  mentally,  physically  and  morally 
by  this  phase  of  army  work. 

Into  these  battalions  go  the  soldier  who  is  inapt  or  does 
QOt  possess  the  required  degree  of  adaptability  for  military 
service,  or  the  one  who  gives  evidence  of  habit  or  traits  of 
character  other  than  those  of  which  a  court  martial  should 
take  cognizance,  these  habits  rendering  his  services 
•indesirable. 

Perhaps  he  is  disqualified  physically  but  is  not  subject 
to  immediate  discharge  on  a  surgeon's  certificate,  or  he  is 
ui  aUen  of  a  neutral  or  allied  country,  or  an  ahen  who  has 
QOt  declared  his  intention  of  becoming  a  citizen  in  the 
United  States,  and  has  been  drafted  through  his  ignorance 
)f  his  rights  under  the  selective  draft  law.  Such  a  man  is 
ient  to  the  development  battalion.  Citizens  who  have 
lot  a  sufficient  knowledge  of  the  English  language  to  per- 
[orm  their  military  duties,  or  citizens  who  have  had  no 
■Hiucation,  are  placed  in  the  battalions  for  educational 
ievelopment.  Alien  enemies  and  conscientious  objectors 
{o  to  the  development  battalions  before  their  cases  are 
dnally  passed  upon. 

The  mills  of  the  gods  that  grind  slowly  also  grind  ex- 
ceedingly fine,  and  the  men  transferred  to  these  battalions 
ire  gradually  sorted  out  into  three  classes;  those  chiefly 
imfit  for  any  service;  those  needing  hospital  treatment  at 
once  and  those  who,  by  special  treatment  and  training, 
may  be  raised  to  a  higher  mental  or  physical  plane. 

As  the  treatment  and  training  progresses,  each  man  is 
ultimately  placed  in  one  of  four  classes.     Class  A  is  for 


those  who  are  fit  for  general  military  service,  who  are  free 
from  serious  organic  disease,  able  to  do  an  average  day's 
work,  able  to  walk  five  miles,  to  see  and  hear  well  enough 
for  ordinary  purposes,  able  to  perform  duty  the  equivalent 
to  garrison  duty,  labor  battalion,  shop  work  in  a  trade  at 
home  or  abroad,  or  combat  service  at  home.  The  United 
States  Guards  are  made  up  of  Class  B  men. 

Class  C  men  are  fit  only  for  duty  in  a  selected  occupation 
or  in  a  restricted  capacity  to  which  they  must  be  limited. 
In  order  to  be  retained  for  service  a  soldier  must  be  eighty 
percent,  efficient  in  at  least  one  trade. 

Class  D  men  are  those  physically  unfit  for  any  military 
service. 

This  is  the  plain  and  unadorned  statement  of  the  work 
of  the  Development  Battalions  in  the  United  States  Army, 
but  the  story  of  the  work  as  it  has  grown  and  widened  at 
Camp  Travis,  where  the  training  of  all  sub-normal  men 
in  the  camps  and  military  reservations  of  the  Southern 
Department  is  carried  on,  is  one  that  thrills  with  human 
interest,  and  is  replete  with  human  incidents,  a  sort  of 
cross  section  of  life. 

When  the  first  drafted  men  began  assembUng  at  Camp 
Travis  and  the  first  organization  began,  it  was  found  that 
the  draft,  like  a  dragnet,  had  brought  in  not  only  the  strong 
and  the  fine  and  the  capable,  but  the  untrained  and  the 
misfits  as  well.  Every  company  had  its  square  pegs  to 
fit  into  round  holes,  and  nobody  had  time  to  whittle  down 
the  jxxjr  uncomfortable  pegs. 

There  was  this  thing  and  that  thing  the  matter.  Men 
could  neither  read  nor  write,  they  were  underdeveloped, 
{Continued  on  page  312) 


OFHCERS— 2nd  DEX'ELOPMEXT  BATT.\LION,  165th  DEPOT  BRIGADE 


1st  Lieut.  Roy  Cowles 

1st  Lieut.  Smith  R.  Webb,  Adjt. 


Seated,  left  to  right 
1st  Lieut.  E.  B.  Burgess 
1st  Lieut.  Clarence  Hornbeck 


Standing,  left  to  light 
•2nd  Lieut.  Benjamin  E.  Smith  2nd  Lieut. 

2nd  Lieut.  R.  R.  Haley  2nd  Lieut. 


Major  Henry  C.  Bender 
Ist  Lieut.  Henry  Furman 


Dave  Patton 
Frank  Price 


230 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


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231 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


Two  Pages  of 


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[232] 


CAMP    TRAVIS    AND    THE    WORLD    WAR 


Depot  Brigade  Pictures 


233] 


CAMP    TRAVIS     WD    THE     V^"  O  R  L  D     \V  A  K 


HEAEQUARTERS   COMPANY.  Ifioth   DEPOT   BRIGADE 


1st  Lieut.  John  R.  Riley 
1st  Lieut.  Herbert  Davis 


Captain  Paul  E.  Flemister 
2nd  Lieut.  W.  C.  Carlock 
1st  Sergeant  Charles  Ray  Long 


Mess  Sergeant  Charles  B.  Miller 
Supply  Sergeant  Henry  M.  Becker,  Jr. 


Sergeants 

Arthur  E.  Reichert 
John  Bigham 
Fred  O.  Caskey 
Tom  Grammer 
E.  W.  Ewton 
Arthur  H.  August 

Band  Leader  and  Assistant 
Luther  D.  Armstrong 
Joe  DeBallaro 

Sergeant  Trumpeter 
VVileyE.  Wilhite 

Band  Sergeants 
John  Streit 
John  D.  Robinson 
Ralph  S.  Brown 
Albert  Streit 


Band  Corporals 

Fred  E.  Schultz 
Dallas  F.  Feazell 
Elmer  Cottingham 
Edmund  E.  Langbein 
Roy  Hetherington 
Joe  Berezik 

Musicians — First  Class 

Louis  F.  Concilio 
Felix  O.  Lange 
.\mos  Barksdale 
Willie  Teltschik 
John  W.  R.  Brown 
Holly  B.  Horton 

Musicians — Second  Class 

Albert  Dietrich 
Joe  B.  Herring 


Stacy  S.  Basinger 
Willie  Granz 
Antone  Tupe 
Willie  Friedrick 
John  .\.  Berger 
Otto  Kruger 
James  N.  Banks 
Raj-mond  Kle>-pas 

Musicians — Third  Class 

Pedro  G.  Garcia 
Bernard  Mavhew 
Walter  Elliott 
Elbert  DeWeese 
John  W.  .Atkinson 
Laurin  McComas 
James  H.  Thomas 
Luther  I.  Vickers 
Joseph  Havlik 


Hery  Hruzik 
Roscoe  Nation 
John  F.  Cimrhanzl 
Vincence  Pechacek 
Ebbie  Dodson 
Roy  Hunt 
Oscar  .\llen 
John  P.  Lee 
\Vm.  R.  Comett 
John  R.  Gore 
Ix)uis  Granata 

Corporals 

WiUiam  D.  WUson 
Hubert  Carter 
Asa  R.  Morris 
S.  Schafferhans 
George  Lenhart 
William  X.  Thompson 


234 


C.  A  M  P     T  R  A  \  I  S     AND     1  H  E     WORLD     VV  A  R 


HEADQUARTERS   COMPANY,   165th   DEPOT  BRIGADE 


Horseshoers 

Ernest  D.  Hagar 
Claude  A.  LeBow 


Cooks 

Harry  Boweis 
John  Thorsell 
J.  C.  Davis 
Alberto  Attkison 
Richard  Ferrell 


Wagoner 
J.  W.  McLaughlin 

Privates — First  Class 

Cornelius  Babcock 
Rebel  E.  Blackwell 


George  Blount 
Richard  Callahan 
Jasper  L.  Ellis 
James  Fincher 
Maurice  H.  Glass 
Chauncey  F.  Pyle 
Garland  Pendleton 
Joseph  Kane 
William  E.  Long 
John  W.  Stott 
F^mil  Weinheimer 
Clifford  O.  Wilkins 


Privates 

Benjamin  C.  Allen 
William  L.  Allen 
Waller  M.  Alexander 
Layton  B.  Barnes 
Olaf  Brandon 


Johan  A.  Bendikson 
Hill  Burross 
William  H.  Burcham 
Bud  Croom 
Edward  Cooney 
Garland  H.  Clanton 
Ollie  L.  Dykes 
Ira  Davis 
Lewis  E.  Downs  . 
William  W.  Dean 
Lawrence  Evans 
Lambert  L.  Erickson 
William  R.  Fromm 
Orville  W.  Graham 
Forrest  T.  Greathouse 
Lee  R.  Gravett 
Aton  Kos 
Frank  Kostelnik 
Albert  F.  Lowry 
Jack  L.  Moore 
Sant  Moore 


Robert  M.  Nelson 
Charlie  Polk 
Everette  G.  Putman 
Hobert  M.  Prater 
Emory  Partain- 
Alex.  H.  Priess  • 
Loguyn  F.  Pheifer 
Luther  G.  Thompson 
Willie  W.  Taylor 
Herman  R.  Tyler 
James  A.  Tarrance 
Owen  Thomas 
Edwin  R.  V'aughan 
Cameil  VanBeile 
Luther  L.  Vickers 
Frank  E.  Wight 
Geoffrev  W.  Wheeler 
Paul  J.'Wolff 
George  L.  Walton 
Furman  L.  Wolf 
Gordon  Ta\ior 


235 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


2oth  COMPANY,  165th  DEPOT  BRIGADE 

Captain  Burton  B.  Spaulding 
1st  Lieut.  Thomas  P.  Hightower  2nd  Lieut.  Raymond  R.  Johnson  2nd  Lieut.  Homer  B.  Hursh 

1st  Sergeant  Wm.  E.  Swift  Supply  Sergeant  David  H.  Porter 


Sergeants 

Benjamin  E.  Armijo 
Willie  M.  Compton 
Lew-is  C.  Harrison 
Edward  J.  Kiker 

Corporals 
John  T.  Bowman 
Harry  K.  Burkhead 
Ed.  M.  Dearing 
Thos.  L.  Fore 
Shedrich  H.  Haile 
Joe  C.  Isdale 
Russell  H.  McCullough 
Joe  W.  McClanahan 
Jim  Pisinis 
Lewis  Russell 
Roy  A.  Van-Dyke 

Mechanic 
William  M.  Harvey 

Bugler 
Daniel  A.  McKinzie 


Privates 

Eugene  F.  Ashbacher 
Loronza  Alarcon 
Barcus  Antrobus 
Fred  R.  Bernhardt 
Wilhelm  A.  Bielfield 
Lowman  M.  Baker 
Alfred  H.  Barkmeyers 
John  G.  Bodden 
Max  A.  Borman 
Hosie  M.  Barnes 
Oscar  Bomer 
Gee  J.  Brewer 
Roger  Barkley 
Waiiam  D.  Buck 
George  P.  Bauer 
John  W.  Cox 
Thomas  B.  Cudd 
Rex  Candlish 
Peter  Gardens 
Charles  C.  Gates 
Luther  H.  Carroll 
Gorden  Collins 


Carl  E.  Carlson 
Jim  H.  Deberry 
Jose  Delgado 
Egon  J.  Dumeniel 
Alvin  E.  Dennis 
Teliier  R.  Eubanks 
Allen  C.  Fun- 
Ernest  C.  Flowers 
Lloyd  Frankson 
George  D.  Faulkner 
Willie  H.  Freudenberg 
Emeston  B.  Foster 
Lacey  O.  Findley 
Otto  E.  Galm 
Pedro  Garcia 
Louis  W.  Gay 
Deitrick  J.  Gembler 
Tadeo  Gonzales 
Scott  W.  Green,  Jr. 
Leonard  P.  Gravett 
James  R.  Gaither 
Chauncy  Gamble 
Henry  T).  Horton 
Alva  Hobbs 


Albert  J.  Hiltgen 
Walter  C.  Hill 
Charlie  Hutton 
George  L.  Hicks 
Richard  A.  Hall 
Louis  Hollenbeak 
Oscar  F.  Holtz 
Barley  V.  Hatlev 
William  C.  HiU' 
Cari  H.  HaU 
Joe  L.  Hopper 
Thomas  P.  Jones 
Henry  L.  Jackson 
William  E.  Jackson 
Henr>- 1.  Kerby 
Connie  Koonce 
Fritz  E.  Jeil 
Paid  P.  Kneuper 
Norman  T.  Kelly 
William  A.  Kiker 
Ell  Lookingbill 
Edgar  H.  Lee 
Jones  F.  Little 
Alfred  C.  Lefors 


[236] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


25th  COMPANY    165th  DEPOT  BRIGADE 


John  L.  Lindahl 
Ernest  A.  Lawrence 
Ernest  A.  Lancaster 
William  H.  Lewis 
Bonnie  M.  Lewis 
Herbert  H.  McAlpine 
George  C.  McKinney 
John  A.  McCurry 
John  A.  McClatchy 
Edgar  R.  McCoUum 
A.  G.  McDowell 
Miner  S.  Murry 
Joseph  M.  Megna 
Willie  O.  Markjnan 
James  B.  May 
William  J.  Meckel 
Gustav  C.  Mergel 
Ralph  O.  Miller 
Marc  H.  Milner 
Francisco  Munguia 
Eathan  A.  Melton 
Willie  A.  Meador 
Franklin  C.  Mann 
James  H.  Moon 


Aubrey  M.  Morgan 
Abe  Mauer 
Arley  A.  Nichols 
Francis  A.  Nelms 
Walter  C.  Neugent 
Henry  Prasatik 
Charles  A.  Putman 
Robert  L.  Pearce 
Frank  M.  Pool 
LeRoy  Payton 
Thomas  J.  Parkman 
Thomas  E.  Price 
Elmer  Parker 
WiUie  R.  Richardson 
Thell  M.  Richmond 
Jewell  N.  Riggan 
John  F.  Reeves 
Domingo  Ramierz 
Adolph  Richter 
Charlie  E.  Rose 
John  H.  Reid 
Dock  Rose 
WilUe  B.  Smith 
Louis  Sammcr 


Soren  T.  Sorenson 
Fritz  J.  Schirmer 
Emil  J.  Schmidt 
George  Schoelzel 
Alfred  H.  Schulz 
Elgin  Steubing 
Shropshire  Stuart 
Lesley  A.  Shaw 
James  F.  Smith 
Jerome  S.  Shaw 
John  W.  Stubbs 
Theodore  B.  Stanley 
James  E.  Smith 
Clarence  Spradlin 
Alfrew  W.  Swaffar 
Ivey  G.  Smith 
Carl  N.  Stanley 
Bruce  C.  Stover 
Herbert  L.  Tingle 
James  A.  Tadlock 
Lonnie  H.  Teague 
Albert  E.  Timmermann 
Bernhardt  Trappe 
Severo  Trinidad 


Curtis  C.  Tucker 

William  E.  Teneyck 

Frank  A.  Vojtek 

Herman  J.  Vogt 

Maximilian  Carl  J.  Von  Hoegen 

Gabel  Washington 

Ed.  F.  Walker 

David  L.  Williams 

Lester  D.  Wyer 

Hubert  E.  Wright 

Francis  R.  Westrup 

Wallace  H.  Williams 

Lewis  M.  Watts 

Ira  G.  Woodward 

Richard  F.  Warnecke 

Frank  Woller 

Arthur  A.  Warren 

George  L.  William 

Evert  W.  Wilson 

Charlie  B.  Willson 

Alfred  Watts 

Antonio  Ximens 


237 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


26th  COMPANY,  165th  DEPOT  BRIGADE 


Captain  Wade  H.  Smith  Lieut.  Warren  C.  Bowlsby  Lieut.  J.  E.  Jones 

Lieut.  O.  L.  Fagerstrom  1st  Sergeant  Walter  B.  Poe 


Sergeants 
Leonard  A.  Bryson 
John  C.  Callahan 
Clem  Otis  Connell 
Thomas  O.  Dickinson 
Alfred  W.  Irby 
Wayne  A.  McMurray 
Frank  E.  Parker 
Joseph  E.  Reese 
Don  M.  Sanders 
Charles  Walton 
Jesse  Paul  Watson 

Corporals 
Flory  M.  Bowen 
Charlie  E.  Botts 
Herbert  G.  Christain 
Jack  Chinn 
Thomas  J.  Caffrey 
Edgar  Fox  Farrar 
Albert  M.  Hess 
Ernest  R.  Hess 
John  E.  Ingram 
Robert  E.  Key 
August  H.  King 
Ben  H.  Litterall 
Hugh  D.  Matlock 
Joseph  F.  McNerney 
Frank  Martinez 
Choice  B.  Norwood 
H.  J.  Orts 
Henry  G.  Odom 
William  N.  Price 
Date  H.  Simpson 
Peter  L.  Sengele 
Earl  R.  Stovall 


William  Webster  White 
Worley  S.  Whitmire 

Buglers 
Walter  John  Afflerbacb 
Wilton  Ischomcr 
John  Thomas  Sellman 

Mechanic 
Walter  W.  James 

Cooks 
Christopher  C.  Goeschidle 
Hans  Meyers 

Privates 
Henry  Otto  Abshier 
Roy  Arnold 

Willie  Raymond  .^dams 
Jose  G.  Archiboque 
Fred  B.  Buckner 
Frankie  Bonetti 
Bernice  Barnes 
Mike  J.  Beach 
.  Jim  Bean 
Louis  Bethke 
Clyde  A.  Bishop 
Stephens  F.  Blanchard 
Ernest  L.  Bridwell 
Cecil  H.  Bums 
Owne  J.  Busch 
Willie  W.  Barrier 
Fred  Brooks 
Jesse  F.  Bohannan 
Walter  B.  Bourland 
Luther  L.  Co.x 


Noah  Carter 
Thomas  Carey 
William  L.  Chaviers 
Bamet  J.  Collins 
Clarence  J.  Conley 
Wilef  F.  Coward 
Raymond  W.  Crutchfield 
Andres  A.  Catter 
Santos  Cardonas 
Homer  Crane 
Edward  E.  Cunningham 
John  T.  Dodson 
Samuel  P.  Denham 
John  L.  Denning 
Horace  W.  Davenport 
Herman  Duenburg 
John  H.  Faught 
Tom  B.  Fitzgibbons 
William  D.  Florence 
Daniel  J.  Fox 
Jesse  F.  Edwards 
Willie  Engelage 
Gilford  Evans 
Edward  R.  Greer 
Milton  D.  Giles 
Homer  Gallentine 
Sevren  I.  Gawlick 
George  H.  Gilder 
George  Gonzales 
John  D.  Gorman 
Bennie  Gormez 
Fred  C.  Green 
Edwin  Grebe 
Joe  E.  GroUimund 
Alfred  Grona 
Herbert  Gummelt 


Fidel  Gonzalez 
.Archie  J.  Graham 
John  M.  Griffin 
Merrill  E.  HoweU 
Hamilton  Hatch 
Dan  Roy  Hoop 
William  H.  Harris 
Gus  Helms 
Claude  P.  Hidy 
Robert  Happner 
Charlie  W.  Hollebcck 
Willie  Heine 
John  W.  Hall 
Sam  I.  Haggerton 
Coleman  D.  Haney 
Isaac  W.  Haney 
William  J.  Hrdina 
Hugo  T.  Isensee 
Edward  Ingraham 
.'\lbert  S.  Johnson 
Earl  A.  Jones 
Eugene  P.  Johnson 
Joe  Jarnagan 
.Adolph  G.  Jensen 
Albert  R.  Jenks 
.Albert  H.  Jackson 
Leslie  L.  Jones 
Pete  Jankowski 
Jesse  A.  Jeffrey 
.■\llen  V.  Jones 
Clarence  B.  Jones 
Tom  Jones 
William  Juenger 
.Allie  D.  Kellermier 
Wm.  C.  Keike 
Fred  W.  Kurson 


238 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


26th  COMPANY,  165th  DEPOT  BRIGADE 


George  R.  Kroeker 
Carl  W.  Kolmier 
Burford  S.  Key 
Roy  King 
John  Kitta 
Barnard  W.  Krampe 
Mose  M.  Kahn 
Andrew  J.  Kemp 
Clarence  M.  Larcom 
Alvin  I.  Langley 
Audie  D.  Landers 
Charles  R.  Lake 
Joseph  B.  Lewis 
Ollie  T.  Long 
Ward  M.  Lehman 
Arthur  Lobaugh 
Harry  E.  Landrum 
Willie  R.  Lee 
Marion  A.  Lingle 
Fred  F.  Lancaster 
George  E.  Lee 
George  I.  Lee 
Newton  A.  Lindsey 
Hugh  Mailleson 
Jesse  Z.  Mills 
Henry  R.  Minton 
Rufus  E.  Mize 
Arthur  A.  Morgenroth 
George  M.  Moses 
William  T.  Mudd 
Samuel  F.  Malone 
Lafayette  T.  Malone 
Albert  Mann 
Joseph  N.  McAtee 
Barge  McCumpsey 
Bradley  McQuerry 
Willie  R.  Morriss 


Lee  I.  Morris 
Walter  E.  Miller 
Frank  C.  Mages 
Nicholas  M.  Mason 
Lewis  B.  Maynard 
Francis  E.  Marsh 
Theodore  H.  Mick 
James  A.  Moore 
John  A.  Morson 
Clifton  F.  Mayer 
Clyde  H.  Muiitoo 
Joe  A.  Myers 
Leland  A.  Morris 
William  G.  Miller 
WiUiam  A.  Melton 
Floyd  Manos 
Harvey  McGarrath 
John  Lee  McKown 
John  W.  Murphy 
Homer  E.  Michael 
Roy  L.  Manning 
Wiley  F.  Moore 
Henry  J.  Noss 
Acie  Nichols 
Fritz  Nemgern 
Rupert  Nichols 
William  R.  Neuforth 
Eric  B.  Neuman 
Andrew  J.  Newman 
Jesse  M.  Newton 
John  M.  Nixon 
Jesse  J.  Noble 
Robert  H.  Norton 
Emil  Odstrcil 
Allen  D.  O'Connell 
Willie  J.  Oppelt 
Curtis  E.  Oswalt 


Arthur  P.  Overall 
Emmett  T.  Owens 
Alfard  W.  Oakley 
Marcus  R.  O'Bryant 
Homer  V.  Overstreet 
Harlen  A.  Odell 
Milton  P.  Plummer 
Newton  R.  Powell 
Charles  C.  Peterson 
Oliver  C.  Palmer 
Jesse  L.  Palmer 
Otis  Peoples 
Jones  W.  Pounds 
Harvey  S.  Perkins 
Weaver  Pettman 
Leslie  G.  Patterson 
John  P.  Page 
William  E.  Priddy 
Robert  B.  Prowell 
Ru<£n  R.  Permenter 
Sidney  Page 
Claude  C.  Parker 
Prince  A.  Peck 
Burnis  J.  Petty 
Charlie  B.  Pierce 
Edward  Preston 
Leo  O.  Rose 
Corbitt  F.  Randall 
Bruno  Raute 
Claude  Redmond 
Albert  Riba 
Clarence  A.  Rice 
Johnnie  B.  Roberts 
Charlie  Rosenauer 
Robert  E.  Russell 
Homer  Richmond 
Tulius  H.  Robb 


Ralph  L.  Rankin 
William  B.  Stephens 
Heindrick  Schlabach,  Jr. 
Marion  M.  Strickland 
Lloyd  W.  Stanton 
Hamilton  W.  Savage 
Linton  S.  Savage 
Roy  L.  Shellhose 
Robert  S.  Standfield 
Ed.  T.  Strain 
George  W.  Stone 
George  L.  Stone 
William  E.  Sugar 
Arthur  E.  Sanders 
Joseph  L.  Tracey 
Ernest  Taylor 
Charlie  A.  Thomas 
Henry  J.  Thompson 
Jos.  W.  Thurmond 
Newell  Timmonds 
David  E.  Tinney 
Kelly  Woods 
Charles  L.  P.  Watts 
Richard  O.  Wade 
John  Townley 
Frank  H.  Ward 
Francis  J.  Worrell 
Walter  J.  Wilkins 
Haskell  B.  Wade 
Arlington  C.  Walker 
Roy  P.  Warren 
Tom  P.  Warren 
Williard  P.  Williams 
Elmer  E.  Wofford 
Hugh  M.  Wright 
John  P.  Wyatt 
William  C.  Youngblood 


289 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


27th  COMPANY,  165th  DEPOT  BRIGADE 


Captain  David  H.  Dewhurst 

1st  Lieut.  Daniel  W.  Drake  2nd  Lieut.  William  W.  Harris  2nd  Lieut.  Walter  Karaszewski 

2nd  Lieut.  Burton  A.  Shupp  1st  Ser:geant  Edward  L.  Pendergast 


Sergeants 
Samuel  Soifer 
Wynne  T.  Danforth 
Myron  M.  Kellog 
David  Fitzgerald 
Henry  C.  Lackey 
Joseph  D.  Bell 
Franklin  C.  Kniss 
Anton  L.  Kraus 
Elmer  R.  St.  John 
John  O.  Andree 
Thomas  D.  Hix 
Guillermo  Walls 
Robert  A.  Hamilton 
Claud  D.  Harris 

Corporals 
Jesse  Richardson 
OUie  W.  Wells 
James  G.  Bishop 
Dee  J.  Ballard 
Ralph  Hudleston 
Isadore  E.  Jecker 
Ralph  S.  Purvis 
Hans  Runk 
Oswald  A.  Willman 
Lloyd  C.  Clark 
Jolm  A.  Braly 
Hugo  C.  Fromm 
George  V.  Schmidt 
Paschal  E.  Tucker 


Carl  A.  H.  Anderson 
William  A.  Cannon 
Paul  F.  Durdum 
O.  L.  Proctor 
Charles  N.  Pesek 
John  L.  Dean 
Kellar  Fouts 
Lonnie  Hancock 
Wesley  C.  Nasin 
Victor  T.  Alstatt 
Julius  D.  AVhitney 
Harley  C.  Wright 
Osward  P.  Martin 
WilUam  J.  Smith 
Joseph  A.  Maurer 

Privates 
Harry  E.  Adams 
William  J.  Alexander 
C.  V.  Alt 
Ben  J.  Altmiller 
Eric  W.  Anderson 
Micia  Aradia 
Horace  A.  Arnold 
Arthur  F.  Ahr 
Joe  Alletag 
Loye  K.  Arrington 
Truett  J.  Bridges 
John  A.  Bacon 
Ray  E.  Bailey 
Robert  H.  Bailey 


Walter  M.  Bailey 
Walter  Baumgartner 
DickBeaU 
Lewis  Beamer 
Ludwig  Bennigus 
Edward  J.  Bendele 
Dock  Bentley 
Ole  Berg 
A.  Bobbitt 
WiUie  Boehme 
Deet  Bonin 
Vernon  L.  Bonner 
John  H.  Boren 
Thomas  H.  Bowen 
John  W.  Bowen 
John  E.  Boyd 
Clifton  E.  Brockway 
Joseph  A.  Bruce 
Jesse  P.  Bruster 
Doler  P.  Bullard 
Jake  A.  Bauer 
Dewey  H.  Brunner 
Bobbie  G.  Bums 
James  B.  Barfield 
Noah  Baugh 
Ernest  E.  Bennett 
Ben  Berry 
Glenn  Bricker 
Dedier  Carlin 
Lonnie  L.  Cash 
James  M.  Cooner 


Joseph  Cook 
James  C.  Campbell 
Grover  Cartwright 
Owen  Carter 
Ray  T.  Castleberry 
Neal  D.  Chapman 
Lloyd  Clark 
John  T.  Coble 
Samuel  A.  M.  Cooper 
George  W.  Coe 
Lewis  W.  Coleman 
Robert  L.  Cole 
Carl  S.  Crow 
Louie  R.  Cross 
Roscoe  Davis 
Peari  C.  Dorrill 
Dearmon  Dunn 
Carl  J.  Faetche 
Marcus  Fecher 
Albert  V.  Foster 
Rhandie  Fountain 
Wesley  Freeman 
George  Freeman 
Walter  Fritz 
Crisanto  Garza 
Hoyt  S.  Gere 
George  R.  Gillaspie 
Sam  Gregory 
Charles  T.  Greer 
Russel  G.  Griffith 
Horace  Grovees 


240] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


27th  COMPANY,  165th  DEPOT  BRIGADE 


Joseph  Guzzard 
George  Gerlofi 
Moses  F.  Goodson 
Hagan  P.  Granthum 
Robert  S.  Hanks 
William  D.  Haney 
Grover  Harris 
Dock  B.  Harris 
Charles  E.  Healy 
Amos  B.  Heidleberg 
Policarpio  Herrera 
Fred  Higgins 
William  W.  Holland 
Thomas  W.  Hord 
Jay  H.  Home 
Theodore  J.  W.  Hugo 
Webster  W.  Huitt 
John  J.  Harrison 
Jess  Jamison 
Robert  F.  Jeffs,  Jr. 
Waldo  J.  Jennings 
Cari  W.  Jones 
WilUam  J.  B.  Kenley 
Ernest  C.  Kobs 
Fred  O.  Koger 
Charley  F.  Korus 
Joe  W.  Kramer 
Irvin  J.  Lee 
Rudolph  Lindner 
Ebie  A.  Little 
Willie  Lock 
Arthur  C.  Long 
David  R.  Lynn 
Horace  A.  Lacey 
John  L.  McDonald 
William  H.  McNutt 
Frank  P.  Maniscalco 


Calixto  Maraida 
Dallas  M.  Martin 
William  J.  B.  Martin 
Tom  Maurer 
Levi  L.  Mayfield 
Arthur  B.  May 
Winfree  W.  Meachum 
Robert  R.  Merritt 
Nolen  Muckleroy 
John  A.  H.  Mueller 
Esteban  Muniz 
James  M.  Mayes 
James  E.  McWhorter 
William  P.  McHale 
Clem  Neilon 
Benson  Norwood 
Victarino  Oliveras 
George  C.  Page 
Frank  Parr 
Lonnie  G.  Paterson 
Roylston  E.  Perkins 
Werner  E.  Peterson 
John  E.  Powers 
Frank  Pruitt 
Edward  O.  Puedro 
Jim  Richardson 
Pantaleon  Rivas 
Miller  R.  Robinson 
Calastico  Rodriquez 
Lloyd  Rogers 
Thomas  E.  Ross 
Charles  D.  Rouse 
Henry  Rupple 
David  E.  Ryan 
Jake  E.  Sackett 
Roy  R.  Sales 
Hipolito  Saldana 


Juan  Salmon 
Jessie  W.  Salter 
James  H.  Sargeant 
Henry  B.  Schmitt 
Carl  A.  Schmitt 
John  Schmidtberger 
Homer  P.  Schrimsher 
Walter  H.  Schubert 
George  V.  Schmitz 
Hilmar  G.  Scheele 
Lloyd  A.  Slevidge 
Lewis  C.  Siebert 
Leo  L.  Slover 
Floyd  T.  Small 
Roy  Smith 
Newell  B.  Smith 
Albert  R.  Smock 
Charles  Southerland 
Joe  Spitzenberger 
John  M.  Stafford 
Joseph  Stasny 
WilUam  E.  Steel 
Fred  H.  Stephens 
R.  T.  Stewart 
Lewis  G.  Stoll 
Alex.  Strecker 
Cloyed  Strange 
Lemuel  E.  Strickland 
Azel  C.  StuU 
John  L.  StuU 
Arthur  Swenson 
WilUam  J.  Smith 
Edward  S.  Sloane 
WiUiam  L.  Slaton 
Ray  F.  Shely 
Fred  C.  Schulu 
Robert  J.  Schaefer 


Levi  Y.  TampUn 
John  P.  Taylor 
Cloma  Taylor 
WiUis  Tharrington 
Benjamin  Thiebaut 
Arthur  C.  Thurikill 
Alvah  H.  Tiley 
WiUiam  B.  Tracy 
James  M.  Trant 
Alvin  G.  A.  Teedemeyer 
Walter  B.  Turnbow 
Dave  Turner 
Joe  Veselka 
Alfred  S.  Violette 
Robert  R.  Voorhees 
Charies  G.  WaUace 
Lloyd  E.  Watters 
Fritz  Weiser 
Robert  R.  West 
Martin  Wiersma 
JeweU  B.  Wilson 
George  E.  Wilson 
Sidney  A.  WiU 
Joe  H.  Windham 
Roy  E.  Winkler 
Clyde  C.  Wise 
Cari  O.  Whitworth 
Lee  R.  Whitt 
Robert  M.  Whitman 
Alfred  Waltmann 
Alvah  W.  WoUam 
Robert  L.  Woodard 
George  D.  Word 
Ernest  E.  Wright 
George  A.  White 
Albert  D.  WilUamson 
Alfred  A.  ZoeUer 


241 


CAMP    TRA\IS     AND    THE     WORLD     WAR 


28th  COMPAXV,  IGoth  DEPOT  BRIGADE 


2d  Lieut.  Lawrence  E.  Feehley 


Captain  Roy  E.  Patterson 
2d  Lieut.  James  E.  Kizer 


2d  Lieut.  Charles  Kleinsmith 


Sergeants 
Charles  E.  Jennings 
Noah  \V.  Evvton 
Walter  W.  Hodges 
Fred  C.  Labenslce 
Roy  H.  Hart 
Dan  S.  Hillsman 
Jesse  H.  Baker 
William  E.  Pruett 
Samuel  Barschow 
James  H.  Clark 
Theodore  B.  Ryan 
Shelly  H.  Alsabrook 
David  E.  Giblin 
Roy  Grantham 
Clarence  JL  Herman 
Newton  S.  Roberts 
Roy  C.  Wilkinson 
Roy  R.  Jones 

Corporals 
John  Lanza 
James  C.  Cotner 
Hugo  L.  Boening 
William  A.  Cannon 
Cyrus  T.  Fields 
Peter  B.  Gohlke 
Frank  M.  Stannard 
Charles  B.  Phillips 
Charley  F.  Schneider 
Joe  E.  Schaded 


First  Sergeant  Walter  H.  Clark 

Henry  F.  Christopher 
Eddie  C.  Reagan 
William  H.  Baird 
Elmer  W.  Hodge 
Frank  E.  Lamb 
Hue  Bryant 

Cooks 
Walter  E.  Calhoun 
George  H.  Higgins 
James  E.  Merchant 
Max  Shoss 
Frank  R.  Ellis 

Mechanics 
Emil  X'ogel 
.■\le.\ander  Knighton 
Peter  W".  Forslund 

Buglers 
.\nton  Kohut 
Jaun  Trebino 

Privates — First  Class 
James  A.  Nordstrom 
Clarence  Williford 

Privates 
James  \.  .Allen 
Cecil  Ball 

Richard  B.  Bartlett 
.'August  J.  Batson 
Alfred  W.  Bender 


Supply  Sergeant  Edward  J.  Mikulenka 


Willie  B.  Black 
Will  M.  Bradley 
Joe  J.  Bryan 
Otis  C.  Burdick 
William  W.  Burke 
Alvie  R.  Carroll 
William  R.  Clogston 
Paul  G.  Conrad 
Louis  T.  Cordes 
Eugene  Crow 
Peter  Cutsubes 
Otto  G.  Dahme 
Henry  H.  Dekker 
Ben  H.  Dikeman 
Oliver  L.  Ellison 
Jess  Faour 
Jackson  Fee 
.\ugustin  Fernandez 
William  H.  Gaither 
James  H.  Galonas 
Cassemere  Garza 
\'an  B.  German 
Charles  H.  Griffith 
Willie  Haak 
'  Bill  Hammond 
Stanley  J.  Harris 
Kmil  M.  Hausser 
Bryan  Heatley 
.August  Hennig 
Edgar  F.  Hennig 
.Appolonio  Hernandez 


Marcario  Hernandez 
Jaun  Herrera 
Frank  C.  Higginbotham 
John  B.  Hill 
Alfred  H.  Hobbs 
Ben  N.  Horney 
Richard  B.  Horney 
.Anton  H.  Huebner 
Simon  P.  Janz 
Grant  W.  King 
James  C.  Kinsey 
Raymond  Kolodziej 
John  O.  Lewis 
Walter  B.  Loggins 
Richard  Ludwig 
William  P.  Mc.Annis 
-Andrew  McCoy 
George  W.  McDade 
John  U.  McDade 
Pat.  McNillan 
Frank  P.  Miller 
Reuben  C.  Moore 
Primitive  Morales 
Jesse  Neeley 
Eddie  C.  Neuman 
-Augusta  Nowak 
Charley  Patalin 
Henry  W.  Pepper 
Jesus  Perez 
Santiago  Peres 
William  Peters 


242 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAK 


28th  COMPANY,   165th  DEPOT  BRIGADE 


George  E.  Poole 
William  J.  Porter 
Ralph  T.  Prive 
Chester  B.  Priddy 
Vasilio  Riviera 
Augusta  Rodrequez 
Manuel  Rodrequesz 
Luther  Rogers 
Earl  R.  Russell 
Alfred  Seenz 
Forest  B.  Sarver 
Willie  B.  Sellers 
Will  H.  Singletary 
Casildo  Sisneros 
Charles  F.  Sohr 
Thomas  L.  Spencer 
Walter  P.  Spencer 
Adolph  Stange 
Martin  Strahle 
Harry  R.  Sutherland 
Patt.  Swogetinsky 
Sterling  E.  Thrower 
August  Till 
Louis  Trevino 
Pleasnat  E.  Turner 
Roy  Vogelsang 
Forest  E.  Wade 
Edwin  C.  Waitschies 
Robert  H.  William 
Dave  Wood 
William  R.  Wright 
Tildon  H.  Burgess 
Lester  Cannon 
Aulie  R.  Cash 
Earnest  Chandler 


Elmer  Clark 
Arthur  R.  Corder 
David  J.  Crawley 
Ernest  L.  Crow 
Alex  Cummings 
Walter  Curtis 
William  J.  Davis 
Walter  G.  Davis 
George  Deutsch 
Frank  J.  Dial 
James  L.  Dobbs 
Hubert  Dressen 
Jesse  E.  Edison 
Leo  M.  Ermann 
Willie  Fahrig 
Green  Fields 
Arthur  B.  F'rank 
Forest  H.  Frith 
Jaun  Garciss 
Amarls  W.  Gentry 
Jesse  Gibson 
Charles  L.  Gillogley 
Lucien  C.  Godbehere 
Monroe  W.  Graham 
Felix  R.  Grant 
Tilman  L.  Gregory 
L.  G.  Harris 
John  G.  Hatcher 
Walter  Hercek 
Antonio  Hill 
Perry  T.  Brumley 
Ne'.son  Burns 
John  S.  Callaway 
Andrew  J.  Caperton 
James  H.  Caton 


Victorina  T.  Copeda 
Loren  R.  Collins 
Rafael  Cordova 
Julian  Criado 
Euell  Crumley 
Floyd  Curtis 
Sam  Cutler 
John  A.  Davenport 
Harry  C.  Davis 
Charles  B.  Deen 
Walter  P.  Denton 
Jesse  J.  Dial 
E.  W.  Dixon 
William  H.  Douthit 
George  M.  Elliott 
Paul  Fabienke 
Thomas  H.  F'arish 
William  J.  Forester 
Earl  Fowler 
Coley  E.  Frizzell 
Santiago  Garza 
Eugene  E.  George 
Riley  D.  Gideon 
John  J.  Gimbernardi 
Charley  E.  Goodlee 
Daily  Z.  Griffith 
Ernest  L.  Grayson 
Rudolph  W.  Goertz 
Harvey  H.  Harris 
Erich  E.  Hobbs 
Pilar  Hernandez 
Christ  Arbanitis 
N.  L.  Billingsly 
John  A.  Brown 
Frank  N.  Cribbs 


William  P.  Dardenne 
Walter  W.  F'irestone 
Hubert  S.  Gray 
Thomas  G.  Greenfield 
Neeley  Greene 
Roland  R.  Hand 
W'illiam  J.  Herrington 
Guy  Knipp 
John  B.  Lake 
Magnus  B.  Larson 
Gussie  B.  Lemley 
Damon  C.  Nichols 
Cline  Pendley 
Terrell  Reed 
Jasper  G.  Rutherford 
George  W.  Sisk 
Paul  M.  Smith 
James  F.  Veazey 
William  L.  Whitehead 
John  P.  Wilson 
Valentine  Sykora 
Benjamin  F.  Byrd 
Edgar  Carr 
Albert  A.  Clark 
Bennie  F'urgeson 
James  Faought 
Stephen  A.  Hoefherr 
James  A.  Langford 
Ashley  O.  Moss 
W.  J.  B.  Ormsby 
Claude  E.  Ratliff 
liarl  R.  Russell 
William  H.  Rylee 
F'rank  H.  Sormrude 
Troy  Whiteside 


243 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


Lieut.  Joe  Patton 

Sergeants 
J.  J.  Russel 
H.  M.  Johnson 
W.  S.  Hughes 
J.  S.  Davis 
J.  C.  Owenby 
C.  R.  Brown 
R.  M.  Menn 
J.  E.  Carpenter 
C.  G.  WUliams 
J.  Riley 
W.  A.  White 

E.  M.  Riddle 

Corporals 
W.  T.  RoweU 

F.  B.  Huey 
J.  F.  Harris 
C.  G.  White 
W.  O.  Boyd 

L.  L.  Cronkrite 
M.  C.  HaU 
A.  A.  Werner 
E.  G.  Chatham 

G.  Cunningham 
R.  C.  Dunham 
M.  L.  Musgrave 
M.  P.  Vaughn 

Cooks 
W.  W.  Wendland 
E.  L.  Corbett 
A.  H.  Arneson 
L.  L.  Kenny 
H.  E.  Ryan 
G.  F.  Goebel 
W.  M.  Davis 


29th  COMPANY,  165th  DEPOT  BRIGADE 
Captain  John  G.  Blanchard 
Lieut.  J.  R.  Link  Lieut.  R.  R.  Landrum 


Privates 
Herman  J.  Adams 
Samuel  L.  Altum 
Hobart  Atterbury 
Lee  G.  Adams 
Carl  A.  -Anderson 
Ramond  L.  Bartlett 
Otto  A.  Bentke 
Harvey  G.  Blount 
Robert  M.  Bowers 
George  R.  Boyd 
Loyd  Booth 
Louis  A.  Bressel 
Samuel  G.  Bright 
Joe  A.  Brigham 
John  A.  Brinson 
Thomas  E.  Brown 
Ottis  Brown 
Miles  D.  Brewton 
Clarence  C.  Biyan 
Leonard  Bates 
Alvin  G.  Baumbach 
Hand  E.  Benad 
Griffith  W.  Bennett 
Robert  C.  Biggs 
John  Campbell 
John  H.  Cherry 
Garland  M.  Carr 
Andrew  Chandler 
Ernest  L.  Chatham 
Hardin  Coffield 
Vernon  C.  Commons 
Petro  Dicresingo 
Robert  L.  Dominy 
Peter  Cada 
Asberj'  T.  Cain 
James  E.  Carpenter 


David  L.  Castle 
Leo  Christen 
Walter  G.  Collins 
Albert  J.  Couie 
George  W.  Creel 
Charles  G.  Crise 
Coy  E.  Dorsey 
Henr>'  E.  Dreyfuss 
Cleofus  M.  Dugosh 
Roy  L.  Elliott 
James  C.  Farley 
Ramon  Garcia 
Rudolph  Gershbach 
William  C.  Goodman 
Spurgeon  G.  Griffis 
Charles  L.  Grubbs 
Joseph  Hall 
Hubert  A.  Hamilton 
Herman  H.  Hand 
Cuffie  Harjo 
Macon  H.  Haney 
Henry  Heidtman 
John  G.  Heintze 
Ross  L.  Hobbs 
George  V.  Hogan 
Leoindas  Hogg 
Thurman  Holland 
Frazier  R.  Holtz 
Oscar  L.  Hooks 
Alton  Howell 
John  Hanicky 
Sheivy  Hudson 
MiUer  B  Hughes 
Jesse  L.  Humphries 
Roy  Hunt 
Hubert  J.  Hunt 
Albert  J.  Hunter 


Lieut.  V.  L.  Yaylor 

Calvin  A.  Hurst 
William  Hurt 
Herman  F.  Hyatt 
Reece  Irwin 
Sam  Inman 
Grover  C.  Irwin 
Walter  A.  Jackson 
Hubert  J.  Jaegy 
Chester  S.  Jennings 
William  H.  Jessen 
George  N.  Johnson 
Henry  M.  Johnson 
William  W.  Johnson 
Charles  B.  Johnson 
James  T.  Jones 
George  M.  Jordan 
Bennie  Kageler 
Charles  R.  Kelley 
Andrew  J.  Kempf 
Claude  Kennedy 
Martin  Kercho 
Bert  King 
James  C.  Kirby 
Clyde  R.  Langford 
Erma  L.  Lilly 
H.  I.  Little 
H.  S.  Meadors 
Gilbert  Midina 
Emil  Mueller 
A.  A.  Nehr 
Jesse  T.  Nolan 
Claude  E.  Payne 
Henry  Sarana 
Walter  Schrader 
John  I.  Scheaffer 
John  C.  Sneed 
Fritz  Stauffer 


[244] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


29th  COMPANY,  165th  DEPOT  BRIGADE 


Wm.  Stauchly 
Wm.  Thompson 
Wm.  Van  Winkle 
J.  T.  Langston 
Wm.  Laramore 
J.  L.  Lashley 
Worthen  Lawhom 
A.  G.  Layton 
A.  D.  Lee 
Wm.  LeGrand 
Chassie  Liggon 
Roy  Lively 
Lones  Lockhart 
J.  H.  Lang 
Ramon  Lopez 
Don  Loyd 
Orlan  Loyd 
Je£E  Mabry 
G.  M.  Magee 
C.  M.  Mahan 
J.  T.  Manning 
Wm.  Marshall 
L.  Martines 
Roy  Mayes 
Joe  Medeles 
John  Melber 
Fred  Mencer 
Buster  Mendoza 
John  Meek 
Thomas  Middleton 
Henry  Milam 
A.  D.  Miller 
Irvin  Mills 
Walter  Mills 
Joseph  Mitchell 
Wm  Mizell 
Charles  Monroe 
Obert  Morgan 
John  Mosley 
I.  E.  Moore 
Nolen  Mullens 


Martin  Mueller 
Marion  Musgrove 
Brownlow  Myers 
A.  L.  McAlliey 
C.  W.  McCorkle 
Sam  McCown 
A.  W.  McCreight 
R.  A.  McDonald 
M.  P.  McGrew 
A.  E.  McLean 
S.  L.  Napier 
C.  H.  Neel 
T.  A.  Nelson 
R.  W.  Nester 
C.  W.  Newman 
W.  H.  Noak 
J.  A.  Noe 
A.  S.  Nobles 
Wm.  Nuckols 
Ernest  Orr 
Earl  Overall 
Charles  Pace 
Richard  Palmer 
Daniel  Parsly 
Clyde  Parsly 
Earl  Parker 
Jose  Pena 
Joe  Penninger 
Edgar  Pennington 
Ale.x.  Petrich 
Jesse  Phillips 
James  Phipps 
Louis  Phillips 
Samuel  Pitman 
DeWitt  Poe 
Robert  Polk 
Hugh  Pollard 
John  Pollock 
H.  C.  Posey 
Guy  Prince 


Samuel  ProfEtt 
Norman  Raby 
Edgar  Rasberry 
Roy  Rash 
Eli  Rice 
Joseph  Riede 
J.  J.  Riley 
J.  O.  R.Uey 
Bias  Riojas 
Joe  Rivas 
Edgar  Roach 
B.  F.  Robinson 
J.  A.  Robinson 
Willie  Rolff 
George  Rosbrugh 
Willie  Roseberry 
Louis  Rosentreter 
John  Rostowsky 
Carrol  Roueche 
D.  G.  Rowland 
Samuel  Runnels 
Vernie  Runnion 
Hugh  Ryan 
Claude  Sangster 
Ben  Schuman 
Henry  Schwartz 
Daniel  Sellers 
Robert  Shannon 
M.  A.  Shelton 
John  Skodras 
Carl  Skog 
M.  C.  Slaughter 
Luther  Smith 
Earl  Smith 
Charlie  Smith 
Barney  Snowden 
Clifford  Stewart 
A.  B.  Stone 
Charlie  Storey 
Lucian  Straughn 


S.  V.  Strand 
John  Suka 
Frank  Serredin 
Lee  Sullivan 
Henry  A.  Tate 
R.  W.  Tuabert 
Clyde  Temple 
Richard  Tengler 
Athie  Thacker 
James  Thomas 
Leslie  Thomas 
John  Thompson 
Nativedad  Torrez 
F.  P.  Townsen 
Jesse  Tucker 
Horace  Tull 
Jose  Valdez 
Dan  Vickerv 
Gilbert  Wadley 
Oran  Wallace 
Forest  Watts 
Leon  Weast 
Sam  Weaver 
Fred  Webb 
John  Webb 
Willie  Wendland 
Charles  White 
Howard  White 
Albert  White 
John  Whiteley 
Oscar  Whitmore 
Garland  Williams 
Clay  Williams 
Leota  Willoughby 
Harvy  Wolford 
Jim  Wright 
George  Wright 
George  Yarborough 
Ardulto  Ybarro 
Ira  Yocum 
Bryant  Young 


245 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


30th  COMPANY,  165th  DEPOT  BRIGADE 


Captain  Woodie  R.  Gilbert 
1st  Lieut.  Harold  H.  Helms 
1st  Lieut.  William  E.  Hicks 


2d  Lieut.  Garvin  J.  Dunlevy 
2d  Lieut.  Gilbert  C.  Ledyard 
2d  Lieut.  Ernest  G.  Loyd 


2d  Lieut.  Henry  G.  Satterlee 

1st  Sergeant  Morley  H.  Lawellin 


Sergeants 
Edgar  C.  Barker 
Robert  D.  Castellaw 
James  A.  Curry 
Jarvis  E.  Dale 
Earnest  A.  Ford 
Julian  D.  Garcia 
Hans  Gottschalk 
Robert  Hughes 
Porter  H.  Hutchison 
Marcellus  Lowe 
Clomer  O.  Martin 
William  C.  Newberry 
James  O.  PuUen 
Grice  A.  Richardson 
Harry  A.  Riggs 
William  H.  Vincent 

Corporals 
Elmer  E.  Bittle 
Era  F.  Blackburn 
Oswald  C.  Freeman 
George  I.  Raydon 
William  G.  VoUus 

Cooks 

Mike  W.  Clark 
Joe  Pritchett 

Machinist 
Otto  Partlow 

Bugler 
George  L.  Thiol 


Privates — First  Class 
Brodie  H.  Ashby 
John  A.  Harris 
Anton  Frank  Absnaider 
Claud  Anderson 
George  R.  Anderson 
Fred  G.  Angell 
Guy  A.  Baber 
Robert  A.  Bailey 
William  B.  Bainey 
Jimmie  L.  Barnhill 
Francisco  Barrera 
James  A.  Bashow 
John  F.  Bateman 
Horace  E.  Baughman 
Sam  Beasley 
Jess  J.  Beck 
Bennie  H.  Becker 
Joseph  Bembrick 
Wiley  R.  Bennett 
Otto  A.  Bentke 
Victor  Bianchi 
Ernest  T.  Blyth 
William  C.  Bolton 
Thomas  S.  Bono 
Elmer  F.  Bowden 
Sidney  F.  Bowling 
Thomas  L.  Bracket! 
Carl  Bratton 
Ed  M.  Brink 
Carl  Brocksmith 
Francis  J.  Brown 
George  Brown 
Joseph  Brown 
Edgar  L.  Brunson 
Isaac  E.  Bryant 


Henry  Buckner 
William  W.  Burcham 
Mack  E.  Burchfield 
Lonnie  C.  Burks 
Marlin  Burns 
Johnnie  A.  Burts 
Coleman  Butler 
Paul  H.  Buxkamper 
Samuel  M.  Byrum 
Alvin  L.  Cagle 
Leonard  D.  Cain 
Henry  Caldwell 
Ralph  H.  Cambell 
Rufus  D.  Campbell 
Holder  H.  Capehart 
Warren  M.  Carter 
Claud  A.  Cass 
Calvin  J.  Cassady 
Thomas  W.  Castellaw 
James  B.  Castleberry 
Louis  A.  Cattany 
Lester  Chandler 
Frank  Chiapetta 
Fred  W.  ChUds 
Frank  L.  Chism 
Clarence  J.  Clark 
Voungie  Clifford 
Marshall  A.  Coburn 
Evart  V.  Cochran 
Rubin  Cogburn 
Hyrom  Collie 
Robert  R.  Coons 
Hannie  J.  Corbell 
William  E.  Coward 
Joseph  M.  Coyel 
Omar  W.  Crabtree 


William  O.  Craft 
Thomas  W.  Crawford 
Lemuel  A.  Crow 
Henry  R.  CuUum 
Fred  J.  Dabner 
Romie  S.  Dagenhart 
Otto  P.  Dentler 
Ola  W.  DeWitt 
Josiah  B.  G.  J.  Dickson 
Jim  C.  Dowdy 
Williard  I.  Dowling 
Thomas  J.  Duncan 
Ernest  A.  Dunham 
Billie  R.  Dyer 
Holland  Eads 
Jack  L.  Edgeworth 
Eula  Edwards 
John  D.  Ellis 
Warner  EIrod 
James  O.  Emmons 
Willie  C.  Ervin 
William  R.  Estes 
Louis  C.  Eubanks 
Lawrence  J.  Evans 
George  O.  Ezell 
Marcus  C.  Faver 
Joe  A.  Ferguson 
Claud  M.  Fetzer 
Jessie  W.  Finn 
George  W.  Folkner 
Claud  V.  Foster 
Claud  B.  Fowler 
William  B.  Frances 
Claud  J.  Freedle 
Charles  C.  Fritts 
William  W.  Frost 


246] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


30th  COMPANY,  165th  DEPOT  BRIGADE 


Rockie  K.  Fuller 
Leonard  G.  Gantt 
Tom  B.  Garrett 
Lewis  E.  Gaskill 
Arden  D.  Gatley 
John  A.  Ghormley 
John  Gibbons 
Edward  W.  Giessler 
Malcom  D.  Gilbreath 
James  A.  Glass 
Erie  M.  Goodwin 
Olis  Golden 
Lawrence  B.  Graham 
Coy  Grail 
James  L.  Gray 
Lee  Gregory 
Carlton  C.  Green 
Dorsie  Green 
VVilburn  B.  Green 
John  I.  Griffith 
Dave  Gross 
Julius  G.  Haas 
John  P.  Hall 
Robert  E.  Hall 
Royce  B.  Hall 
Byron  C.  Harrison 
Mason  Harwell 
Eerim  W.  Hatcher 
Tracy  J.  Hayter 
Eugene  C.  Headley 
Edgar  A.  Hennig 
Charles  M.  Henry 
Walter  Henton 
Sidney  Herrel 
Louis  Heyroth 
Nathaniel  J.  Hicks 
Charlie  H.  Hill 
Clyde  H.  Hill 
Horace  G.  Hines 
Charles  A.  Hink 
Bruce  Hinkle 
Lenox  L.  Hinton 


Albert  F.  Hoffman 
Austin  B.  Holland 
James  E.  HoUey 
James  C.  Holmes 
Lewis  R.  Hoisted 
Monroe  M.  Honrell 
Newton  W.  Hooser 
William  O.  Horn 
Alfred  Houston 
Forest  A.  Howsley 
John  C.  Hudman 
Alma  W.  Hudson 
William  M.  Huie 
Loyd  E.  Hull 
Roy  L.  Hunter 
Dallias  Impson 
Charlie  Jackson 
Vivian  G.  Jackson 
Edward  J.  Janovsk\- 
Joe  Jarzombek 
Hubert  G.  Johnson 
Oscar  J.  Johnson 
Reed  G.  Johnson 
Charlie  S.  Jones 
Earl  B.  Kerbow 
Charles  S.  Kinnebrew 
Joseph  Lake 
Lonnie  E.  Lamb 
John  T.  Lancaster 
John  M.  Lavender 
John  N.  Long 
Ernest  E.  McClelland 
Archie  B.  McLaughlin 
David  C.  McMurry 
Thomas  J.  Maultsby 
Claud  M.  Medows 
Hardy  E.  Means 
Romulus  L.  Means 
Braxton  A.  Medows 
James  F.  Merriott 
Ode  C.  Milham 
James  J.  Mixon 


Hugh  L,  Moon 
John  K.  Mullens 
Joe  J.  Neisser 
Charles  W.  Nichols 
John  S.  Nichols 
William  E.  Nichols 
Henry  Nortsworthy 
Theodore  P.  Offutt 
James  O.  Ostrom 
Roy  E.  Parker 
Jess  W.  Paul 
Marcus  L.  Paulsen 
Homer  Pitcock 
Homer  M.  Pittman 
Teofil  Ploch 
Cleaver  Powell 
Tyrus  E.  Price 
Lee  M.  Randell 
John  E.  Ratz 
Eugene  Raynes 
Joseph  C.  Rector 
Wallace  C.  Reed 
Rufus  Renfroe 
Johnnie  M.  Rennick 
Horace  M.  Rhett 
Clarence  O.  Riales 
John  F.  Riebschleager 
Clarence  Roberson 
Otto  I.,  Rogers 
John  R.  Rucker 
Emil  Sabrsula 
Bayard  M.  Sewell 
Allan  J.  Shamblin 
Willie  J.  Shelly 
John  L.  Simpson 
Dwight  E.  Sisk 
George  Skinner 
Ernest  M.  Smith 
Ish  D.  Smith 
Louis  Smith 
D.  B.  Sparks 
Fitzhugh  L.  Springer 


Perez  C.  Stillman 
Jesse  J.  Stagner 
Eugen'fe  H.  Standard 
George  A.  Stanger 
William  O.  Stapleton 
William  B.  Statham 
Jay  Steward 
Jim  D.  Stewart 
Walter  Stockston 
Roy  T.  Stone 
Henry  Stroth 
Wilborn  E.  Stutts 
Samuel  W.  Tally 
Birkley  N.  Taylor 
George  W.  Teafatiller 
Rhea  C.  Terr 
Lee  E.  Thomas 
Orvel  Thompson 
John  D.  Thornton 
ElUs  M.  Tidwell 
James  N.  Tillman 
Albert  T.  Warren 
Harry  F.  Waters 
Earnest  C.  Watkins 
Harvey  Watkins 
Sidney  Watkins 
Albert  Watson 
Claude  H.  White 
Ernest  White 
Wilson  White 
Laurence  R.  Whitton 
Hammond  H.  Wilcox 
Charlie  H.  William 
James  L.  Williams 
John  E.  Williams 
Morris  L.  Winkle 
Ervin  Woodard 
Sam  P.  Woolum 
Vernon  Wright 
Jim  G.  Yates 
James  O.  Yoes 
Adolph  Zuehl 


247 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


31st  COMPAXY,  16oth  DEPOT  BRIGADE 


Lieut.  John  L.  Nash 


Lieut.  H.  H.  Mackenzie 


Lieut.  George  Swartz 


Lieut.  Arthur  F.  Westfall 


Supply  Sergeants 
Roy  B.  Jinkins 
Louis  C.  Leonard 

Sergeants 
Dean  Sebring 
Horace  M.  Cook 
C.  Y.  Dowlen 
W.  A.  Edwards 
Bryant  L.  Beaird 
A.  H.  Parsons 
Harold  Zochert 

Corporals 
Joe  Wright 
Rufus  L.  Phillips 
Hal  G.  Boyd 

Privates 
Lundy  L.  Ackerman 
Sam  P.  Alexander 
Arthur  A.  AUen 
Naudy  Anderson 


Harmon  .\vey 
Ernest  H.  Bastain 
Delbert  M.  Beck 
Louis  Bidault 
Harrj'  L.  Black 
Sidney  R.  Bowers 
Claud  M.  Braswell 
Orlie  M.  Brisco 
Robert  A.  Brown 
Roy  H.  Buckland 
Samuel  W.  Butler 
Eddie  Franklin  Bennett 
Arthur  S.  Black 
Ralph  H.  Black 
Joe  J.  Blum 
Boley  A.  Boles 
Carl  F.  Boysen 
Barney  W.  Brackman 
Ballard  P.  Bradley 
Price  S.  Butler 
John  S.  Carter 
Joel  R.  Chambers 
Emmett  Cheek 
Carl  L.  Clark 


1st  Sergeant  John  B.  Muckle 

Jackson  J.  Clark 
William  H.  Clay 
Fred  H.  Coleman 
Hayter  F.  CoUins 
Dee  L.  Conner 
George  R.  Contreres 
Otis  M.  Coogan 
Leo  Cummings 
Charlie  J.  Cole 
Colonel  O.  Collier 
Willie  E.  Connolly 
Homer  S.  Cave 
Charles  C.  Carroll 
Jasper  R.  Dickey 
Thomas  J.  Dickson 
-Arthur  DLxon 
William  M.  Dixon 
William  P.  Driskell 
Green  Duke 
Henry  A.  Davis 
Arthur  E.  Diebel 
John  L.  Downey 
Mi.  Doyal 
Julius  Dunday 


Tom  H.  Ellis 
Loyd  J.  Erv'in 
Hiram  Finley 
Erich  W.  Fischer 
Joseph  A.  Ford 
Frazer  A.  Fugua 
Charlie  Roy  Farmer 
Isaac  A.  Faught 
Trawl  B.  Fitchett 
WiUiam  Forster 
Henry  Edward  Fox 
Clarence  Freeman 
Roufus  L.  Gaulden 
Loonie  L.  Giles 
Rossie  O.  Gilliam 
Jack  M.  Gladden 
Joel  M.  Goodwin 
Carl  B.  Gramling 
William  Jessie  Gibbins 
John  Joseph  Gleason 
Frank  Bemhard  Goodman 
Jim  Mulkey  Gregory 
Earl  L.  Harp 
Robert  A.  Harrold 


William  S.  Hamblen 
Leonard  E.  Haug 
Frank  G.  Hermesmeyer 
Walter  P.  Hendrix 
Thomas  J.  Hopkins 
Homer  L.  Hutton 
Jim  H.  IsbeU 
Howard  S.  Jackson 
Lonie  Jennings 
George  W.  Johnston 
Pink  Johnson 
Edward  B.  Jones 
Preston  B.  Jones 
Ernest  W.  Jones 
John  J.  Kasper 
Jessie  B.  Keith 
Virgel  E.  Kelcy 
Tollit  Kerr 
Albert  S.  Key 
Jas.  A.  J.  Kuicaid 
Edward  J.  Klish 
Wm.  R.  Knight 
Florence  Knowles 
Willie  Krueger 


[2n  ] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


31st  COMPANY,  165th  DEPOT  BRIGADE 


James  L.Lawhorn 
Carl  M.  Lowry 
Vernie  R.  Lytle 
Otho  L.  Malone 
Charlie  J.  Maywald 
John  Mikulik 
Mijamon  H.  McEwin 
Carl  McFadden 
Edward  K.  McMahan 
David  E.  McNew 
Littleton  O.  McPherson 
Aurelio  Marconi 
Eugene  R.  Martin 
O.  C.  Martin 
Oren  H.  Mast 
William  R.  Mathis 
Jackson  L.  Mathews 
Jim  M.  Matthews 
Walter  J.  Merz 
Sam  G.  Miller 
Willie  Moegelin 
Jessie  E.  Moore 
Gaines  M.  Morris 
James  M.  Morrison 
Matt  C.  McCutchan 
James  R.  Nixon 


Oscar  Norton 
Tom  Ed  Ogla 
Charley  C.  Orrell 
Virgil  E.  Owens 
Glaucus  A.  X.  Parker 
Jeff  Davis  Parkson 
Jesse  C.  Penrod 
Leavy  M.  Perkins 
Roy  D.  Pettigrew 
Walter  B.  Pfluger 
Sam  H.  Pike 
Sam  W.  Pinner 
Henry  A.  Polnack 
Edgel  H.  Poulter 
Jacob  F.  Rather 
Othel  G.  Reeves 
Charles  L.  Reedy 
Erwin  F.  Rimkus 
Newte  Roberts 
Marvin  J.  Rogers 
Thomas  M.  Roller 
Porter  Roup 
Paul  Rubinstein 
Martin  Rumble 
Sam  D.  Sanders 
Sidney  C.  Sanders 


Ourn  Sapp 
Gee  Saul 
Bruno  G.  Schultz 
Frederick  K.  Scroggins 
Artie  L.  Seay 
Sidney  Sharp 
Martin  Simon 
John  P.  Skarda 
Bryant  C.  Skeen 
Henry  M.  Slawson 
Warren  C.  Smith 
Floyd  Smith 
Loy  B.  Smith 
Bolivar  H.  Smith 
Edwin  D.  Smith 
Jno.  Barkley  Smith 
Leonard  L.  Smith 
Oscar  B.  Smith 
Quitman  C.  Smith 
Samuel  F.  Smith 
Irvin  Snell 
Otha  Sparks 
Arthur  Sparkman 
Marion  E.  Stanfield 
Cecil  E.  Stan- 
Richard  Stapper 


Geo.  C.  Staton 
Edward  J.  J.  Stein 
Olive  P.  Storm 
Herbert  F.  Strickland 
Harry  A.  Sutphen 
James  H.  Sutton 
Noel  A.  Sutton 
Herbert  I.  Sanderson 
Isaac  A.  Singleton 
Andrew  P.  Smith 
John  Smith 
James  H.  Sutton 
Carlo  Tamborello 
Geo.  W.  Tate 
Fred  Taylor 
Wilson  V.  Taylor 
Roscoe  Tolar 
Anthony  G.  Treadgold 
Clifton  R.  Tucker 
John  Valusck 
John  J.  Vanderburg 
Lewis  Phillip  Voiding 
Albert  C.  Von  ForeU 
Fred  O.  Wallace 
Wofford  G.  WaUace 
Lee  A.  Wallis 


Charles  M.  Ward 
James  C.  Wheeler 
Russell  Wheeler 
Walter  H.  White 
Lonnie  Fred  Willis 
Robert  F.  William 
Willie  A.  Witcher 
Minnard  W.  Wilson 
Major  H.  Williams 
Luther  J.  Williams 
William  C.  WindeU 
John  P.  Wilmuth 
James  C.  Womack 
Arthur  L.  Woody 
Will  Daniel  Wooster 
William  J.  Worley 
Arthur  A.  Wurzbach 
Benjamin  T.  Yancey 
Jewel  J.  Yates 
Elmer  W.  Young 
AUie  Younts 
Victor  Zamora 
Albert  J.  Zuehlke 


249] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


32nd  COMPANY,  165th  DEPOT  BRIGADE 


1st  Lieut.  Lafayette  C.  Ebling 


Bennie  W.  O'Fallin 
Leslie  C.  Vanover 
James  F.  Riley 
Maurice  A.  Wilkins 
Wifliam  H.  Patrick 


Bynum  B.  Faubion 


Captain  Otto  L.  Eversberg 
2ncl  Lieut.  Leland  .\ggson 

Sergeants 
Clyde  E.  Morton 
Alva  C.  Bailey 
Sam  McRoy 
Alfred  F.  Manny 


1st  Sergeant  James  H.  Stacey 


James  P.  Fite 
Francis  M.  Thomason 
Claude  1.  Penrv 
Albert  C.  Black 


Jerome  G.  Co.\ 


Corporals 


Boss  Sanders 


James  O.  Parham 


250 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


32nd  COMPANY,  165th  DEPOT  BRIGADE 


Walter  B.  Akers 
Dewey  W.  Berry 
Andrew  F.  Buland 
Heber  A.  Colclasure 
James  E.  Cox 
James  L.  Crain 
Thomas  J.  Daniels 
Charley  F.  Davis 
R.  T.  Daniel  Edmondson 
Roy  P.  Evans 
Charles  E.  Fulton 


Privates 


Leo.  J.  Gibbons 
Jesse  D.  Glover 
Herman  Gregg 
Thomas  J.  Heard 
John  D.  Huey 
Sidney  C.  Huckabay 
Cazzie  E.  Kennedy 
Charles  R.  Ogilvie 
Jim  S.  Best 
Thomas  B.  Canady 
William  F.  Crouch 


Ernest  L.  Daugherty 
Albert  M.  Dellis 
Luther  R.  Filer 
Horace  F.  Embree 
James  W.  Faulks 
Jesse  D.  Garrett 
Edward  J.  Glass 
Alex.  N.  Graham 
Claudie  C.  Hayes 
Kurt  J.  Hornuff 
Perry  F.  Hj'de 


William  A.  Kelley 
Thomas  E.  Lucas 
Vollie  McDonough 
Elroy  C.  Munson 
Robert  D.  Olliver 
William  B.  Turner 
John  D.  Wright 

Mechanics 
Jesse  J.  Witte 
Will  B.  Cook 


251] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


33rd  COMP.VNY,  :65th  DEPOT  BRIGADE 


2nd  Lieut.  Joseph  Green 


Captain  William  C.  Mitchell 
2nd  Lieut.  Elga  Glendy 


2nd  Lieut.  Jas.  W.  Marshall 


Sergeants 


Harry  A.  Howk 
Jonnie  R.  Andrews 
Hiram  M.  Barton 
James  B.  Bishop 
Norbome  Champion 
William  S.  Cobb 
Herbert  R.  Crone 
Frank  R.  Davidson 
Ruskin  J.  Fisk 
Claud  C.  Harrell 
Roy  M.  Ivy 
Jessie  H.  Jackson 
Richard  H.  Jacobs 
Manton  A.  Lee 
Earnest  S.  Matthews 
Ralph  W.  Monroe 
Alph  C.  Oler 
Elmer  S.  Reynolds 
Joseph  C.  Smith 

Corporals 

Roger  M.  Beasley 
John  C.  Biediger 
Roy  T.  Davis 
Melvin  C.  Dippel 
Luther  F.  Dunagin 
Felix  C.  Golzales 
Earl  W.  Goode 
Atkin  E.  Hayden 
John  F.  Harris 
Jim  M.  Hinton 


Frank  J.  HoUey 
John  B.  Kennedy 
William  Horous 
Alvin  V.  Hurth 
Frank  J.  Miller 
Franz  C.  Miller 
Samuel  W.  Popejoy 

Privates 
Edward  Abel 
George  E.  Adams 
Ollie  M.  Abraham 
Chas.  C.  Agent 
Lanier  W.  Ard 
Wilhelm  G.  Ackelbein 
Barry  N.  Allen 
Jack  P.  Allen 
Thaddeus  D.  Bell 
Earnest  Bennett 
WUUam  D.  Bledsoe 
PhilUp  B.  BroadweU 
Stephen  M.  Br>'an 
Harry  P.  Barton 
August  Buschmann 
George  A.  Butcher 
Silas  C.  Castleberry 
John  J.  Chernosky 
Ambro  J.  Chudej 
Alvie  M.  Churchwell 
CharUe  C.  Clarkson 
John  M.  Clary 
Wilson  F.  Clawson 
Wade  Clay 


Charlie  U.  Cole 
John  F.  Collier 
George  W.  Copeland 
Erby  A.  Correll 
John  A.  Crabtree 
Ray  C.  Crosson 
Delus  Culver 
Thurman  Cunningham 
Emmett  J.  Darby 
Samuel  S.  Davis 
Tillman  B.  Davis 
CharUe  J.  Dayton 
Mack  Dodson 
Otis  F  Dodson 
Wallace  E.  Donald 
Earnest  C.  Ebeiling 
Peter  B.  Elliott 
Walter  J.  EUiott 
Herman  W.  Engle 
Charlie  D.  Epperson 
Lambert  L.  Erickson 
Chas.  J.  Forgie 
Spurgeon  Foreman 
Thad  E.  Foxworth 
William  R.  Frazier 
Homer  L.  Fuller 
Robert  Z.  GaUion 
Theodora  Garcia 
Alvin  W.  Gass 
Marler  C.  Gay 
Lonnie  E.  Geer 
Murrie  C.  Giles 
Roy  H.  Gough 


Phillip  W.  Greer 
Bert  Haggard 
O.  D.  Harbrough 
John  F.  Hallow 
Buster  Harvey 
Bruno  M.  Havens 
Jack  Hemson 
A.  N.  Hester 
Clinton  L.  Hobbs 
D.  R.  Hodges 
Earnest  H.  Hoese 
Theo.  H.  Holworth 
Noel  C.  Hood 
David  A.  Hunt 
Rex  L.  Hunter 
Grady  Hurlev 
Herbert  L.  Hutman 
Albert  T.  Ingwerson 
Lovick  Irish 
Albert  L.  Irwin 
Robert  Isom 
Lester  T.  Ivy 
Thomas  C.  Jacobs 
Guy  D.  Jacob 
Otis  L.  Johnson 
Carl  Jones 
CharUe  D.  Jordan 
James  E.  Jordan 
John  Jupe 
Joe  Kahanek 
Robert  Kelsey 
Henry  G.  Kemp 
Joe  F.  Kendrick 


[252] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  W  ORLD  WAR 


33rd  COMPANY,  165th  DEPOT  BRIGADE 


Dale  E.  Kennedy 
James  M.  Kissinger 
Homer  B.  Klepper 
Aimer  V.  Kline 
Hal  M.  Knight 
Joseph  Kovar 
Joseph  Kucera 
Hobart  F.  Lanier 
William  La  Valley 
LeRoy  Lewallen 
Carl  L.  Linn 
Luke  Listi 
Jess  Little 
Ralph  Lofland 
Garland  O.  McAuley 
M.  A.  McBride 
Willie  McCain 
Jeremiah  J.  McCarthy 
Robert  F.  McCrone 
Monroe  E.  McDaniel 
Barney  L.  McDowell 
Jessie  A.  Mack 
Henry  T.  Manley 
Thomas  M.  Marshall 
Ellis  B.  Martin 
Siggie  H.  Mervin 
Alvin  Mieth 
Sam  Milinkowsky 
Samuel  R.  Miller 
Clint  H.  Montgomery 
Hallie  A.  Montgomery 
Edwin  L.  Moore 
James  W.  Moore 
Joseph  R.  Moore 
James  M.  Murphy 


Jess  J.  Murphy 
Richard  C.  Murphy 
Earnest  T.  Myers 
Emmett  F.  Nolan 
Varney  Norton 
Felix  Parker 
James  E.  Parker 
Shook  Parker 
Robert  L.  Peabody 
Henry  I.  Pierson 
Lloyd  W.  Perry 
Sam  Pickle 
Fred  H.  Pierce 
John  W.  Pinchard 
Willie  Pomikal 
Tom  R.  Poole 
Homer  Porter 
James  A.  Potter 
Thomas  L.  Powell 
Will  Prince 
Jack  J.  Pritchett 
Albert  D.  Rawlings 
Doanie  Redeagle 
Hardin  L.  Reed 
Francis  M.  Reynolds 
Charlie  Rhoads 
Claude  E.  Rich 
Thaddeus  D.  Rife 
Edwin  L.  Rinn 
Willford  C.  Rister 
Joseph  O.  Robert 
Riley  H.  Robertson 
Theodore  Rodriguez 
Oscar  G.  Ross 
Lawrence  Sanderford 


Paul  X.  Schalla 
Roger  X.  Scheihagen 
Herbert  G.  Schrader 
Louis  W.  Scribner 
Oscar  C.  Shouse 
Massey  G.  Silliman 
William  O.  Slaughter 
William  A.  Smart 
Andrew  Smith 
Charles  J.  Smith 
Clifton  P.  Smith 
Fred  D.  Smith 
T.  L.  Smith 
Wayne  A.  Smith 
Earnest  A.  Smithart 
William  H.  Sobey 
Arthur  M.  Spears 
Edward  E.  Stennett 
Henry  H.  Stevenson 
Walter  Stevenson 
Delmar  B.  Stone 
Joseph  R.  Stone 
Henry  H.  Stratton 
J.  T.  Strickland 
Martin  B.  Stewart 
Adam  Swafford 
Irvin  M.  Talley 
Banny  Tasoki 
Thomas  F.  Terry 
Horace  B.  Tharp 
Bill  Thompson 
Will  M.  Thompson 
Melvin  C.  Tidwell 
Joseph  E.  Trammel 
James  H.  Turner 


Stephen  Tylajka 
Jessie  L.  Ulmer 
Richard  J.  Venable 
John  K.  Vesalka 
Charles  A.  Voyles 
Clifton  B.  Wagsta£E 
Dewie  Waldie 
Albert  L.  Walker 
Corbett  C.  Walker 
John  A.  Walker 
John  B  Walker 
Samuel  W.  Walker 
Thomas  R.  Walker 
William  W.  Walker 
Murray  Warren 
Livingston  Watts 
James  Weatherford 
George  J.  Wellnitz 
Frank  T.  Wendt 
John  W.  White 
Thomas  M.  White 
Walter  M.  Whitton 
Phillip  Williams 
Roy  M.  Williams 
Roy  Wilson 
Thomas  F.  Winter 
Alvin  0.  Withrow 
Floyd  E.  Wood 
Allen  R.  Wortham 
Clayton  E.  Wright 
Raymond  Y.  Young 
John  A.  Zworke 
Hugh  Spinks 
William  Buckner 
David  Y.  Paulk 


[253; 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


34th  COMPANY,  165th  DEPOT  BRIGADE 


Captain  M.  J.  Burelbach 


Lieut.  Louie  Crowe 

2nd  Lieut.  Marglin  McMorris 


2nd  Lieut.  James  McBraun 
2nd  Lieut.  Ragsdale  McNeill 


2nd  Lieut.  Olin  P.  McVVhirter 
2nd  Lieut.  Joseph  Beduarchik 


Ist  Sergeant  Joseph  .\.  Sohm 
Supply  Sergeant  John  J.  Breen 


Sergeants 
Clarence  W.  Barker 
Buford  IVL  Batts 
Charles  L.  Boyd 
Luther  H.  Brooks 
Francis  B.  Clark 
John  E.  Cooke 
Guy  Hough 
Harry  T.  Lassiter 
Giles  P.  Lester 
Claude  M.  McDaniel 
David  W.  Stafford 
Ger.  W.  Marshall 

Corporals 
.\lbert  Bond 
William  H.  Brooks 
Earl  Hatch 
Josef  Hubert 
Frank  O.  D.  Karney 
Willie  O.  Key 
Harvey  C.  ilorrow 
Robert  L.  Nugent 
Claude  C.  Reagan 


Mechanics 
Lonnie  E.  Darnell 
Martin  L.  Williams 

Cooks 
James  D.  McBride 
Otis  I.  Hughey 

Buglers 
Harry  A.  DIore 
Lester  J.  Downum 

Privates 
Robbie  S.  Ale.xander 
ToUie  Allen 
Joe  A.  Alonzo 
Charlie  .\rnold 
Will  E.  Atkins 
Rafael  Baca 
Henry  .\.  Bair 
James  E.  Barfield 
Frank  H.  Barch 
Millford  M.  Benson 
Moe  N.  Bernstein 


Thomas  Blackman 
Albert  M.  Blanchet 
Andrew  Blanchet 
Roland  C.  Boiler 
Howard  Bostick 
Abner  Brabham 
Lester  Braddock 
Douphitt  Briggs 
Herman  F.  Bruechner 
William  E.  Brunsteter 
Robert  .\.  Brydon 
Francisco  Cardona 
Homer  R.  Carpenter 
Thomas  A.  Carter 
Claud  D.  Clark 
James  A.  Covert 
Saburn  A.  Crawford 
Levi  T.  Crenshaw 
James  D.  Davis 
Albert  H.  Decker 
Marvin  E.  Dees 
Martin  Diaz 
Wharton  L.  Dickey 
Grover  F.  Dickerson 


Phillip  Digiovanni 
James  S.  Dockrey 
John  W.  Dorsey 
Albert  Dreyling 
Joseph  W.  Duncan 
Robert  T.  Duncan 
Reuben  Durst 
Fletcher  C.  Easley 
Rov  A.  Edmonds 
William  E.  Ehlert 
Harry  J.  Gongler 
Morris  L.  Greensten 
Richard  L.  Griffin 
Clarence  Hadden 
Geo.  M.  Hale 
Earl  L.  Harris 
Oscar  Hartley 
Willie  H.  Hearn 
William  H.  Herbst 
Patrick  G.  Hill 
Sterling  L.  Holcomb 
Henry  Hornberger 
Joe.  Hosoun 
Robert  D.  Hughes 


254 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


34th  COMPANY,  165th  DEPOT  BRIGADE 


Charles  W.  Hickes 
John  W.  Jeanes 
Lee  R.  Johnson 
Meyer  Kalvorisky 
Erik  Kampainen 
Earl  S.  Keese 
Max  I.  Keller 
Thomas  H.  Kibbey 
Adolph  Kloebedans 
Jim  J.  Kocian 
Willie  J.  Kocurek 
Frank  A.  Kuban 
Edmond  Kubicok 
Arnold  Lammert 
Wesley  G.  Leake 
Curtis  A.  Lemon 
John  R.  Long 
Elias  Lucero 
Lester  E.  Ludwick 
Willie  M.  McDaniel 
Henry  E.  McElroy 
Kinner  McEntire 
Walter  H.  ilcEnturff 
Archie  A.  McLaster 
Burton  E.  McNeil 
James  E.  McWhorton 
Cecil  J.  JIahoney 


Jay  B.  Marshall 
Felix  Matula 
Cecil  E.  Mayall 
Bryan  C.  Meehan 
Elbert  L.  Miller 
Guy  W.  Mitchell 
Gus  G.  Moench 
John  A.  Morgan 
Frank  L.  Morris 
Ramon  Mungia 
Herbert  D.  F.  Neinstedt 
William  E.  Norwood 
Leonard  G.  Nowlin 
Guadalupe  Ornelas 
Ben  C.  Owsley 
Joe  E.  Pace 
Jesse  A.  Patterson 
Joe  B.  Patterson 
Lake  Patton 
Elmer  Penix 
Waymond  W.  Perkins 
Newton  J.  Petitt 
Arthur  M.  Pfefferkorn 
Albert  Pilat 
Thomas  J.  Pittman 
Harry  F.  Powers 
Everett  G.  Putman 


Oliver  V.  Rabks 
Samuel  S.  Ragland 
Henry  G.  Pade 
Thomas  G.  Ray 
John  J.  Redmon 
Wain  W.  Reese 
John  W.  Reid 
Joe.  Reo 
John  B.  Riley 
Harman  Ringer 
Bryan  Rinks 
Glen  Robason 
William  F.  Robbins 
Pablo  Rocha 
Albert  T.  Rodgers 
Garnett  E.  Saint 
William  S.  Sanders 
William  G.  Sauer 
Robert  Shelby 
Marion  S.  Shuler 
Peny  Sigal 
Charles  O.  Simpson 
Jesse  L.  Sinor 
Ernest  Smith 
John  S.  Smith 
Loniedas  Smith 
Roscoe  C.  Smith 


Jno.  Smotek 
Joe  Slatmack 
Carl  C.  Sullivan 
Gordon  Taylor 
Phillio  O.  Teter 
John  B.  Thaxton 
William  H.  Thedford 
Luis  Trevino 
Delma  W.  Trotter 
Earby  D.  Tucker 
Albert  0.  Turn 
Howard  M.  \'anaman 
Bryant  R.  Vaughn 
Charles  B.  Verner 
Charles  E.  Walker 
William  T.  Walker 
Elbert  G,  Wall 
Julius  O.  Way 
Leon  A.  Wilkening 
Geo.  C.  Williams 
Lee  K.  Wing 
Willie  ^^  Wishert 
Sam.  Willis 
Charlie  W.  Young 
John  S.  Zan 
Sidney  M.  Zeigler 


255 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


^ 


35th  COMPANY,  165th  DEPOT  BRIGADE 


Captain  Harry  Marx 

1st  Lieut.  Charles  R.  Wakefield 

2nd  Lieut.  Julius  L.  Lohoefer 


2nd  Lieut.  Olin  P.  McWhirter 
2nd  Lieut.  James  B.  Nourse 
First  Sergeant  Elmo  O.  L.  Arnold 


Mess  Sergeant  Joe  M.  Strahan 
Supply  Sergeant  Caspar  A.  Washbura 


Sergeants 
Rupert  E.  Martin 
Fritz  C.  Roensch 
Geoige  W.  Burton 
Charles  R.  Cooper 
Ben  W.  Cornish 
Jewel  Davis 
Roy  C.  Florence 
Clyde  E.  Goodner 
William  Johnson 
Chester  A.  Jorgenson 
Major  McLeimon 
Johji  R.  Martin 
James  M.  Sanor 
Carl  D.  Savage 
J.  Floyd  Smith 
Alfred  H.  Trostman 
Floyd  B.  Whitson 

Corporals 
Jim  Bender 
James  E.  Hartley 
Russel  H.  McCullough 
Wallace  W.  Oliver 
Frank  E.  Smith 
Henry  G.  Bostick 
Emos  H.  Howard 
Jake  M.  Jousan 
Edwin  B.  Saulnier 
Ralph  B.  Sweet 
Clyde  B.  Towles 

Privates 
Frank  J.  Albrecht 


Elbert  C.  Bagby 
Hugh  Barger 
Milton  O.  Bennett 
Charlie  B.  Berry 
Walter  Bille 
Theodore  J.  Blume 
Edwin  M.  Brady 
LeRoy  C.  Brown 
Jim  Bujnoch 
Lew  Cargill 
Uriah  M.  Cerf 
Robert  V.  Charbula 
.■\demare  I.  Chiodi 
Paul  C.  Coffin 
James  R.  Cooper 
Milton  B.  Cunningham 
Samuel  L.  Davidson 
John  P.  Degenhardt 
Max  Diez 
John  F.  Dorrell 
Warner  W.  Duke 
Helmar  A.  Erickson 
Oscar  L.  Ferguson 
William  L.  Ashbum 
John  F.  Baker 
Lee  J.  Barnard 
Clarence  Berglund 
Milton  D.  Autrey 
Terry  J.  Balhom 
Pete  Bench 
Fred  M.  Berkey 
Fred  A.  Berry 
Ferdinand  Billeck,  Jr. 


William  .\.  Bivens 
Lee  R.  Blaylock 
Forest  B.  Bourland 
Robert  D.  Boyd 
J.  D  Bridgewater 
Ben  Brown 
Richard  L.  Brown 
Bums  Buchanan 
Hubert  E.  Butler 
Francisco  Cadena 
William  Carroll 
Paul  Caughey 
T.  O.  Chapman 
Johnnie  Chappel 
August  Chauvin 
Alvin  Chick 
Frank  Chivene 
John  B.  Clopton 
Lewi«  J.  Conrad 
John  Conway 
Evan  M.  Cox 
Henry  V.  Crabtree 
Hubert  M.  Curry 
Joe  L.  Danford 
Richard  G.  DaWes 
Lemma  Day 
Walter  B.  Denton 
Herman  Dietel,  Jr. 
William  J.  Dickey 
Albert  Dornhocfer 
Thomas  V.  Dotson 
Ben  H.  Duke 
Jesse  B.  Elliott 
Larkin  Elliott 


Vernon  H.  Fain 
Hanz  Feise 
Abraham  O.  Fleen 
M.  R.  Flemming 
James  D.  Florence 
Elihu  Floyd 
Emanuel  Fort 
Louis  W.  Foster 
Charles  D.  Freeman 
William  M.  Freeman 
Lemon  L.  French 
Fred  N.  Fryer 
Jacob  Fuchs 
Richard  F.  Fundenburg 
Ralph  Fuller 
Rudolph  Funnan 
Toni  Gantilo 
Alfred  E.  Ganzer 
Grover  C.  Gardner 
Pedro  Garcia 
George  V.  Garrett 
Daniel  Garrison 
Alfred  A.  Geske 
John  H.  Glover 
Joseph  A.  Greer 
Fritz  Gustafson 
Desidro  Gusman 
Henry  L.  Hanby 
Ernest  L.  Hargrove 
Walter  T.  Harper 
.\rthur  S.  Harris 
Walter  B.  Harrison 
William  A.  Harrisoa 
John  A.  Hart 


256 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


^-^^^ 


35th  COMPANY,  165th  DEPOT  BRIGADE 


Grover  C.  Hartley 
George  B.  Haynes 
David  Hernandez 
Daniel  Hill 
Elmer  E.  Hidge 
Oscar  H.  Hoelter 
Thomas  L.  Holland 
Christopher  Holtz 
Robert  C.  Homeyer 
Joseph  Horbecker 
Marvin  W.  Howell 
E.  M.  Huskey 
Walter  D.  Ireland 
William  A.  Jackson 
Frank  A.  Jennings 
Francis  W.  Johnson 
John  W.  Johnson 
Carl  M.  Jones 
Lercv  Jones 
Otto'Kallie 
Joseph  C.  Kennedy 
Jesse  King 
John  M.  King 
Almus  J.  Kirby 
John  Kirk 
Walter  B.  Kisner 
Charles  Krause 
Adolph  Kubena 
Fred  W.  Kugler 
Fred  A.  Kunze 
James  R.  Lamb 
William  P.  Langford 
Eugene  S.  Lawler 
Belen  S.  Lawrence 
Gust  Lazaris 
Harry  Leon 
Charles  H.  Lewis 


Elijah  A.  Lindsey 
George  H.  Little 
Oscar  T.  Luce 
T.  E.  Luecke 
Virgil  G.  McCary 
Gale  McClure 
Thomas  J.  McCormack 
James  W.  McCoy 
WilUam  C.  McDonald 
Jimmie  F.  McGuire 
John  W.  McKinney 
James  A.  McMichael 
Joe  Machac 
George  C.  Matkin 
William  B.  Matleck 
Harmon  D.  Minick 
Gusie  B.  Mitchell 
Oscie  B.  H.  Mitchell 
Robert  H.  Morris 
Joseph  T.  Mosely 
Jeff  Murphy 
John  B.  Nelson 
Dennis  E.  Norris 
Lewis  D.  Northen 
James  R.  O'Quinn 
Antonio  Ortega 
John  L.  Osburn 
Watson  E.  Palmer 
Norman  E.  Parker 
Arthur  C.  Pate 
Charles  J.  Pennock 
Samuel  F.  Pereira 
Harvey  E.  Perry 
Alec  H.  Peterson 
Claude  F.  Pfau 
Flovd  W.  Phillips 
R.  B.  Pidcoke 


James  O.  Pierce 
Ben  A.  Pinckney 
James  W.  Pittman 
Otis  M.  Price 
Charles  S.  Reed 
William  T.  Reeves 
Jesse  W.  Rhodes 
Paul  J.  Rhotenberry 
Samuel  Roberson 
Sigfried  F.  Rosenberg 
Firman  J.  Rowney 
Fred  A.  Rucker 
James  R.  Salisbury 
Isaac  L.  Salter 
Jim  Sanchez 
Louis  H.  Scholtz 
Temple  E.  Scrimsher 
Louis  J.  Seitz 
Chester  H.  Seward 
George  W.  Shelton 
Jesse  W.  Shelton 
Charley  Shields 
John  Shirley 
Archie  W.  Sides 
Harry  I.  Simmons 
William  D.  Simmons 
Pete  L.  Sims 
WiUiam  D.  Skiles 
Andrew  Smith 
Ernest  L.  Smith 
Thomas  H.  Smith 
Jr.cob  Soils 
Otto  M.  Spoonemore 
Jesse  H.  Stephens 
James  P.  Stewart 
William  B.  Stinson 
Paul  B.  Stoughton 


Friedth  J.  Svendsen 
Ernest  Taber 
Archie  C.  Taylor 
Alfred  C.  Terry 
John  J.  Thomas 
John  C.  Thompson 
Elo  Tietjen 
John  H.  Timmons 
John  A.  Tom 
Arthur  E.  Travis 
Jack  B.  Tullis 
George  Uttz 
Fritz  G.  V^on  Minden 
Oscar  E.  Wade 
LeRoy  W.  Wait 
Charles  F.  Waits 
Doe  J.  Walker 
France  T>.  Walker 
Sidney  Wallace 
Harvev  B.  Walston 
BurrelL.  Walters 
Marvin  P.  Walters 
Edgar  A.  Watkins 
Frank  M.  Weber 
Willie  O.  Webster 
Charlie  J.  Werlla 
Edgar  B.  Whitney 
Lem  C.  Williams 
Ralph  R.  Williams 
Charles  A.  Wilson 
Walter  Wilson 
Ellia  Wingo 
Charles  B.  Witt 
John  F.  Wutrich 
Ora  A.  Yarrington 
James  C.  Zapalac 
James  Zideck 


[257] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


36th  COMPANY,  165th  DEPOT  BRIGADE 


Captain  Otto  E.  Pentz 
2nd  Lieut.  C.  E.  Dalley 


1st  Lieut.  Charles  E.  Smeltz 
2nd  Lieut.  G.  F.  Holderreid 


2nd  Lieut,  .\rthur  Kail 

1st  Sergeant  Paul  R.  Spaulding 


Sergeants 

Harris  T.  Allen 
Koy  M.  Bass 
Geo.  \V.  Carlyle 
Grank  G.  DeWitz 
Walter  L.  Duke 
Efstration  P.  Efslration 
Herschiel  R.  Overboy 
Samuel  A.  Pink 
Ernest  T.  Vogelpohl 
Robert  \V.  Varnell 

Corporals 

Otto  .\nderson 
\Vm.  M.  Copeland 
Harry  A.  Kinkead 
Robert  E.  Wozniak 

Privates 

Kiahra  Adams 
Oluf  Anderson 
John  C.  -Anderson 
Otto  C.  .Angcle 
Claude  E.  .Austin 
Harry  E.  Bailey 
Arbie  Baldwin 
Colonel  X.  Baldwin 
Ralph  M.  Banks 


Edward  L.  Barber 
James  E.  Barnette 
Charles  F.  Barr 
Graham  .\.  Barron 
Leon  R.  Barron 
Arthur  L.  Becker 
Howard  Benefiel 
Jno.  \V.  Bigon 
Carl  E.  Bjork 
David  R.  Black 
J.  B.  BlackweU 
Jarolin  Branecky 
Jno.  R.  Brice 
Leslie  H.  Brittian 
Summer  D.  Brown 
Noval  L.  Buchanan 
Walter  S.  Burnett 
Steven  J.  Burk 
Tyra  H.  Burk 
Edgar  R.  Cameron 
Dee  F.  Cargal 
Wm.  C.  Carlson 
Wm.  A.  Chambers 
Leslie  H.  Clark 
Clarance  W.  Clayton 
Jno.  T.  Clayton 
Emmett  R.  Clements 
Rov  E.  Click 
Alfred  E.  Oliver 


Albert  H.  Cole 
Wra.  J.  Collinsworth 
Taylor  Cox 
Elmer  H.  Craddock 
Loyd  Davis 
Jim  Davis 
Wm.  J.  Downs 
Ruben  B.  Daugherty 
Elias  Davis 
James  F.  Dunlap 
Ira  Y.  Edwards 
Paul  A.  Eklund 
Henry  M.  Emerson 
Thomas  W.  Fair 
James  \'.  Farmer 
Jeremiah  Farmer 
Carsie  B.  Ferguson 
Thomas  W.  Fitzgerald 
Cecil  M.  Fitzgerald 
Macedonia  Flores 
James  B.  Floyd 
Horace  C.  Fowler 
Envin  O.  Fricdricks 
Cecil  M.  Funk 
Smith  D.  Galbraith 
Walter  O.  Ganzert 
Richard  E.  Gentry 
Armond  S.  Glidewell 
Clarance  A.  Graves 


Jack  A.  Griffin 
Tno.  J.  Haden 
Robert  L.  Haney 
Geo.  F.  Hanley 
Ed  D.  Harder 
James  W.  Harle 
Wm.  .A.  Hays 
Steven  E.  Hays 
Doss  Henley 
Barnard  E.  Herzo? 
Fritz  R.  Hilbrich 
Albert  H.  Hill 
Wm.  .\.  Hin/.e 
Nathaniel  D.  Hirsch 
Johnnie  W.  Holland 
Joe  H.  Howell 
Geo.  W.  Huddleston 
Charles  E.  Hudson 
Hobart  Hull 
Jessie  D.  Ivy 
W'm.  T.  James 
Dave  M.  Garratt 
Jno. D.  Jeffcoat 
Robert  L.  Jones 
Robert  E.  Johns 
Axel  H.  Johnson 
Ralph  Johnson 
Will  Gennings 
Adolph  J.  Janda 


[258' 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


36th  COMPANY,  165th  DEPOT  BRIGADE 


Alfred  N.  Jackson 
Ira  Kennedy 
Dan  K.  Kelly 
Wm.  E.  King 
Geo.  H.  Kitchens 
Wm.  C.  Knight 
Henry  G.  Kovar 
Ludwig  E.  Kiibenka 
Charles  W.  Ladwig 
Wm.  F.  Lamb 
Jessie  C.  Langston 
Kelly  R.  Lasater 
Jim  L.  Latham 
Willie  J.  Lau 
Julian  B.  Lauterstein 
("lifford  Lawrimore 
Wilmer  Lcet 
Aron  Levine 
Philip  Littleton 
Leonard  E.  Lindecker 
Arctas  W.  Long 
Claude  W.  Long 
Guy  W.  Looney 
Geo.  W.  I.ummus 
Wm.  H.  McCredie 
Robert  J.  Mclntyre 
Marion  L.  McKay 
Jno.  W.  McKcnzie 
Wm.  E.  McKinley 
Augie  McKinney 
Willie  D.  McNutt 
Fanchcr  McWhorter 
Rufus  Magouirk 


Joe  K.  Martis 
Charley  R.  Massingill 
Henry  L.  Matthews 
Plesant  E.  Mavhew 
.\nen  E.  Meek" 
Hugo  H.  Melde 
Clarence  D.  Miller 
Robert  R.  Miller 
Albert  F.  Mize 
Arthur  J.  Moore 
Joe  D.  Moore 
Oscar  J.  Moore 
Fred  F.  Morse 
Jno.  M.  Morgan 
Robert  E.  Lee  Mott 
Edward  M.  Myers 
Jim  B.  Naron 
Roy  O.  Neal 
George  Neisser 
Thomas  B.  Newsom 
Jno.  M.  Nicholas 
Alfred  L.  Nixon 
Percy  Nowell 
Charles  R.  Ogilvie 
James  N.  Ogletree 
Arthur  J.  Orman 
Manuel  Orosco 
Edward  J.  Oyen 
Roscoe  Pace 
Jno.  V.  Paine 
Edgar  Pankratz 
Lawrence  R.  Parham 
James  C.  Parker 


Joe  A.  Peschke 
Emil  Petrusek 
Mike  Peveler 
Charlie  B.  Pinkerton 
Emmelt  W.  Plummer 
Edwin  Preuss 
Mack  Price 
Tom  D.  Price 
.\rthur  J.  Proffitt 
Willie  A.  Pullen 
Rebel  L.  Pulley 
Anton  Radicke 
Clarence  E.  Randolph 
Albert  S.  Ray 
Port  L.  Richard 
Arthur  H.  Riggs 
Louis  P.  Rilling 
Fred  W.  Ritter 
Wallace  W.  Robbins 
Leon  L.  Rosenberg 
Colman  L.  Rowland 
Alford  T.  Rusche 
Thomas  J.  Scarber 
Edwin  E.  Schroeder 
Jno.  T.  Schulte 
Wilber  C.  Self 
Willie  T.  Sherrill 
Archie  C.  Simmons 
William  L.  Simmons 
Albeit  L.  Smith 
James  A.  Smith 
Jno.  W.  Smith 
Courtney  Spears 


Henry  C.  Spitzer 
Thomas  M.  Staples 
HartweU  J.  Stevens 
Ivon  L.  Stevens 
Thomas  A.  Sudbury 
.\rved  B.  Sundbeck 
William  C.  Swain 
Aitie  T.  Swiney 
William  B.  Swim 
Robert  Taa£fe 
Wm.  R.  Taylor 
Lui  Tesone 
James  R.  Tieadway 
Frank  J.  Vasek 
Lafayette  JL  Walker 
Jno.  B.  Wallace 
Bryan  M.  Waller 
James  L.  Waidlow 
Alwin  Weiser 
James  F.  Whitaker 
Walter  B.  Whitaker 
Robert  G.  Williams 
Charles  R.  Wood 
Claude  P.  Worley 
Dolan  Wright 
Charles  R.  Yancey 
Horace  G.  Youngblood 
Solomon  T.  Zellars 
John  L.  Corder 
Oliver  W.  Crick 
Arthur  P.  Day 
Thomas  E.  Shafer 
Silvery  Tersini 


259 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


1st  DEVELOPMENT  BATTALION,  165th  DEPOT  BRIGADE 

1st  DEVELOPMENT  COMPANY 

Captain  Amett  C.  Smith 

1st  Lieut.  Frank  N.  Mallory  2nd  Lieut.  Harry  M.  Parker 


Sergeants 
Bemous  W.  Brewer 
David  Ford 
Arthur  Henning 
Russell  R.  Trimble 
Joseph  S.  White 
Bruce  T.  WiUhite 

Corporals 
Ben  Anderson 
William  Beradt 
William  Z.  Blake 
Don.  P.  Cross 
Clarence  E.  Hulbert 
Jay  Ingram 
David  S.  Ramseur 
Dolpha  S.  Rowland 
Lawrence  A.  Suprenant 


Privates 
Wiihehn  G.  Ackelbin 
Harry  Arrick 
William  Bixby 
Ben.  L.  Boyd 
Charles  L.  Boyer 
Erby  E.  Burnett 
Arthur  M.  Burckel 
Call  R.  Bidgood 
Emmit  Chandler 
Taylor  Cox 
Charles  J.  Dayton 
Joseph  Dubose 
Wilbcrt  Dermint 
Hemy  M.'  Emerson 
Doctor  A.  Epps 
Fletcher  C.  Easley 
Fotest  Giddens 


Jacob  Grody 
Albert  E.  Griest 
Malcolm  Harris 
Carl  M.  Harris 
Arthur  Hulbard 
Cheslcy  W.  Hyde 
Raymond  J.  Harris 
Charles  E.  Hooten 
Joseph  M.  James 
Jeorge  Johnson 
Leonard  B.  Jones 
Daniel  Jordan 
Frank  Kadlecek 
Peter  G.  KeUy 
Sol  G.  Kline 
Ed.  Kubidek 
Willie  B.  Lambert 
Wilmer  Leet 


Floyd  C.  Lemon 
Robert  M.  Leonhardt 
Pick  McCoy 
Zepha  V.  McLaughlin 
Tom  Maclamore 
John  F.  Moore 
Woodward  W.  Moore 
Clyde  Masey 
Henry  O.  Noack 
Nick  Obarow 
Richaid  Palmer 
John  H.  Pool 
Uriel  Price 
Leo  C.  Radtke 
James  Register 
.\ntonio  Rajecki 
Bill  Rasberry 
Robert  I..  Russell 


[2m 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


1st  DEVELOPMENT  BATTALION,  16oth  DEPOT  BRIGADE 
1st  DEVELOPMENT  COMPANY 


John  Sadler 
Cediic  Scott 
Frank  Steinocker 
Charles  Sheridan 
Charles  Sohr 


Wilbur  Slansburry 
Frank  P.  Schillizzi 
Peter  Tambury 
Henry  A.  Tyler 
Ed.  Tucker 


Arthur  Van 
Stanley  Wessner 
William  W.  White 
Larkin  D.  Welch 
Watt  Wolf 


Frank  D.  Woodward 
Leonard  W.  White 
Frank  Zuelecke 


2nd  DEVELOPMENT  COMPANY,  165th  DEPOT  BRIGADE 
Captain  H.  H.- Hudson 


1st  Lieut.  H.  S.  Smith 


1st  Lieut.  H.  G.  Cheetham 


2nd  Lieut.  E.  F.  O'Brien 


Joe  Amburn 
Vincent  Amadia 
Joe  Balaski 
E.  J.  Baur 
W.  H.  Bolan 
M.  L.  Booton 

B.  L.  Bowles 
L.  H.  Crandell 

E.  H.  Cunningham 

C.  Dunlap 
W.  A.  Erwin 
L.  C.  Gould 
C.  A.  Hehmke 


C.  Horn 

L.  L.  Johnson 

J.Jobe 

L.  W.  Kaiser 

i;  Leib 

C.  Maner 

J.  H.  Melton 

S.  E.  Moss 

R.  E.  McGee 

C.  McDonald 

Jonathan  Nicks 

M.  O'Brien 

W.  G.  O'Neal 


W.  J.  Opalla 
A.  Price 
Jack  Popham 
I.  W.  Ratcliff 
R.  J.  Rauber 

E.  C.  Robertson 
J.  H.  Smith 

I.  E.  Smith 
L.  Szkarbia 
C.  Turtle 
J.  H.  Ward 
R.  R.  Yoakum 

F.  K.  Yarbrough 


J.  B.  Andrews 
Joseph  A.  Amburn 
Morris  L.  Booton 
Byard  L.  Bowles 
WiUis  A.  Erwin 
Lutlier  C.  Gould 
Claude  Maner 
Joel  H.  Melton 
Roy  J.  Rauber 
Ira  E.  Smith 
Charles  Turtle 


[261 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


2nd  DEVELOPMENT  BATTALION,  165th  DEPOT  BRIGADE 


7th  DEVELOPMENT  COMPANY 


Sergeants 
Roy  A.  Armstrong 
John  A.  Ballowe 
Theodore  Clovenger 
William  A.  Davidson 
John  D.  Dunlap 
James  C.  Greenway 
James  H.  Higgins 
George  P.  Hopkins 
James  W.  Trimble 
William  G.  Wagner 
Leonard  W.  Waits 

Cooks 
Stephen  Basinger 
Percy  McCaughy 
Charles  A.  Steen 
Dodloff  W.  Steubing 

Mechanics 
Ix>uis  C.  Doberenz 
Powell  Erwin 
Lee  Roy  Nix 

Buglers 
Felix  Corvono 
Willie  C.  Harris 

Corporals 
Owen  G.  Berryman 
Gilbert  G.  Cooper 
James  K.  Conlin 
Jacob  P.  Dee  Mar 
Tom  Cavrol 
Rex  L.  Goodwin 
Charles  A.  Grun 
Grover  C.  Harvell 
Arthur  J.  Holden 
Arthur  Holmes 
Will  L.  Hoko 


Robert  J.  Huddleson 
Clarence  E.  Jennings 
WUliam  KeUey 
George  M.  Kirkland 
Henry  L.  Luwe 
Joe  May 
Louis  Mitchell 
Charles  W.  Mullinix 
Hillis  H.  McDaniel 
Henry  Hugh  Perry 
John  W.  Schlosser 
James  B.  Stephens 
Roscoe  R.  Tarr 

Privates 
Archie  D.  Anderson 
Frank  C.  Ames 
Dar  L.  R.  Adams 
William  B.  Arnold 
James  A.  Bargisch 
Wiley  R.  Balthrop 
Joseph  Barrish 
Murry  C.  Berrv 
Da\dd  Olan  Be'vill 
Carl  S.  Bloomquist 
Ennis  Brooks 
John  Brown 
John  W.  Brown 
Sam  Calma 
Sampio  D.  Cook 
William  D.  Cannon 
William  P.  Cox 
Steve  Grumpier 
John  Cunningham 
Henry  Carlisle,  Jr. 
Boston  Cook 
Mack  E.  Davis 
William  B.  Dewes 


Hugh  H.  Denbo 
Edgar  A.  Dikes 
William  H.  Downing 
Jack  H.  Donham 
Claude  C.  Edmiston 
Frank  C.  Edwards 
Edward  J.  Filers 
Hubert  Elder 
Clarence  C.  Emmons 
Walter  W.  Ernst 
Van  B.  Fanning 
Jesse  F.  Figuerron 
Clarence  J.  Findley 
Leo  C.  Gabriol 
George  E.  Gardner 
Albert  Garner 
William  G.  Gammill 
Walter  L.  George 
Pink  H.  Gilliland 
Clarence  J.  Gibson 
Bernard  E.  Goolsby 
James  P.  Goodman 
WiUiam  O.  Hallett 
Thomas  W.  Hamby 
William  B.  Hurst 
William  A.  Hawkins 
Julian  Haughton 
Napoleon  B.  HoUey 
Julius  G.  Heincke 
Forest  R.  Hill 
Will  Hutchinson 
Ed.  Isbell 
Willis  G.  Jernigan 
Lloyd  B.  Johnson 
Jim  T.  Jones 
Arthur  Jung 
Newton  J.  Krause 
Sidnev  C.  Knobloch 


Herbert  C.  Keeper 
Otto  Krohn 
Harry  A.  Krueger 
E.  Lopez 
Henry  Lomport 
James  M.  Llewellyn 
Joseph  H.  Lloyd 
Owen  T.  Lindley 
Sam  Lowellen 
Albert  P.  Lohmann 
St.  Brown  Matheny 
Edwin  J.  Mason 
John  B.  Manning 
Robert  Matchler 
¥A.  McPhetridge 
Brue  A.  Middleton 
Banks  B.  Martin 
Oscar  Montgomery' 
Frank  C.  Martinez 
Charlie  M.  Moss 
Albert  R.  Modlin 
Charles  Moncooyea 
Jessie  J.  Moss 
Walter  A.  Nelson 
John  C.  North 
Juan  Naba 
John  H.  Osborn 
Alfredo  O'Rea 
Joseph  W.  Pierson 
Otto  Ploss 
F-verette  E.  Ponix 
Louis  O.  Ponder 
Jerry  O.  Prucha 
Ed.  Raymond 
Elbert  Ray 
Jake  Ray 
Albert  Rodriquez 
Carl  A.  Rainey 


Robert  J.  Rieser 
Mike  Ross 
Frank  Ryle 
Walter  H.  Schmidt 
Joseph  Sarno 
Harvey  L.  Shull 
Otto  Stecher 
Marion  A.  Smith 
Elvin  L.  Sellers 
James  Stathakos 
Wiley  J.  Shackelford 
John  M.  Skidmore 
Dorcey  M.  Stamps 
William  O.  Stine 
Loy  E.  Stone 
Henry  Stout 
Henry  Tappe 
Thomas  W.  Thomson 
Jim  M.  Thomas 
John  E.  Thompson 
Andrew  H.  Thorson 
Claude  J.  Upchurch 
Herbert  S.  Vinson 
Joe  Voitle 
Noes  O.  Walles 
Eldon  K.  White 
Homer  A.  Wilkerson 
.\sa  F.  Williams 
James  F.  Woods 
Will  V.  Wood 
Joseph  W.  Worsham 
William  R.  Wright 
John  P.  Wright 
Edwin  R.  Wurzbach 
Wilbur  Young 
Avery  Young 
Roy  A.  Yowell 
Nick  Zimmerman,  Jr. 


262  1 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


2nd  DEVELOPMENT  BATTALION,  165th  DEPOT  BRIGADE 


5th   DEVELOPMENT   COMPANY 


1st  Lieut.  Roy  Cowles 
2nd  Lieut.  Daniel  E.  Smith 
2nd  Lieut.  Dave  Patton,  Jr. 
1st  Sergeant  James  G.  Dalby 
Mess  Sergeant  Jose  D.  Guerra 
Supply  Sergeant  Edward  S.  Kiol- 
bass 

Sergeants 
Eric  H.  Anderson 
Charles  Watson 
Joseph  E.  Moore 

Corporals 
Jesse  D.  Scott 
Clyde  G.  Jones 
Jesse  G.  Rumbo 
Joe  LaRue 

George  W.  Trowbridge 
.\rthur  H.  Klingelhoefer 

Mechanics 
Soren  P.  Christensen 
Oscar  B.  Nickelson 


Privates 
Solomon  D.  Lamb 
Raymond  O.  Stuart 
John  F.  Allen 
Joseph  L.  Arbgast 
Serafin  H.  .\rocha 
Avert  W.  Ashford 
Jeff  L.  Bagley 
Hiram  E.  Barker 
Floyd  V.  Beaver 
Willie  Bednarz 
Bryan  W.  Bell 
Robert  L.  Black 
Frank  W.  Bonnctt 
John  H.  Bowman 
Berry  F.  Brown 
Robert  E.  Chandler 
Leonard  Childress 
Homer  D.  Crawford 
Thomas  E.  Davis 
James  S.  Diggs 
James  C.  Ellison 
Clarence  Forquer 
Oran  L.  Frazier 
Dallas  Fruge 


William  S.  Gandy 
.Armando  Garza 
Fred  P.  Granger 
James  Gray 
Oscar  Hamell 
Earl  R.  Hamrick 
George  Haney 
Herman  R.  Harkness 
Jesse  Heady 
Harry  Hewett 
Alva  E.  Hill 
Archie  R.  Holder 
Ernest  F.  Home 
Gus  M.  Howell 
Bertram  C.  Jacobs 
Mitchel  J.  Johnson 
Rov  W.  Johnston 
William  M.  Larson 
George  O.  Lawrence 
.Abraham  LeMuns 
Manuel  B.  Llorenle 
Joseph  T.  Lombard 
Carroll  H.  Lovell 
William  H.  Marshall 
Charlie  Messina 
Edwin  H.  Moore 


Ben  .\.  Morris 
John  Muric 
Stergois  Pappas 
Guy  Parker 
Robert  Parks 
Hipolito  Perez,  Jr. 
Robert  E.  Rippey 
William  R.  Rogers 
Walter  R.  Sandifer 
Clifford  P.  Savoie 
Thomas  J.  Sharp 
Elmer  E.  Sherrell 
Jesse  E.  Speck 
George  M.  Stalsby 
Claude  L.  Stewert 
Travis  W.  Strong 
George  P.  Summers 
Harry  W.  Terrell 
William  L.  Thompson 
William  L.  Tracv 
John  P.  Truett  ' 
John  E.  Viano 
Delbert  L.  Vickers 
.•\rthur  Waldrop 
Frank  R.  White 
Ira  J.  Wilson 


263 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


3rd  BATT.\LION,  165th  DEPOT  BRIGADE 


1st  Lieut.  Hermann  H.  Seek 
1st  Sergeant  Frank  J.  Lane 


11th  COMPANY 

Captain  Oliver  Graves 

2nd  Lieut.  James  S.  Rust 
Supply  Sergeant  Irby  M.  Black 


2nd  Lieut.  B.  Russel 

Mess  Sergeant  Axel  J.  Myers 


Sergeants 
Charles  B.  Horton 
Jesse  I.  Wilbom 
William  A.  Jeske 
James  E.  Dorsey 
William  C.  Baker 
Clarence  H.  Lindsey 
ilike  Misoury 
John  D.  Randolph 
Ed.  Saab  . 

Corprfrals 
Joseph  A.  Hansen 
Hal  E.  Potts 
John  Paturas 

Privates 
Benjamin  \.  Adkins 
Anthony  .\ndre 
David  Lee  Avery 


William  .\.  Barry 
Alvin  Beckermann 
Josef  Bielarz 
Edward  J.  Bird 
.■\rthur  Bongartz 
Walter  Brylinski 
Stanley  Bulzgis 
Andrew  Bugay 
Louis  Campolongo 
Robert  Lee  Cox 
Gardiner  Davis 
.\lbert  Dolinsky 
Walenty  Domochowski 
Los  Ebarbe 
Ernest  Erickson 
.Antonio  Gedda 
John  K.  Grubbs 
Arthur  L.  Hall 
Leonard  W.  Hall 
Harry  D.  Holt 


Jack  P.  Horning 
Silas  C.  Kneese 
.\lbert  Jojo 
Adolph  Kelm 
George  B.  Kennedy 
Nikolas  Kuis 
John  L.  Lamer 
Mike  Tom  Lizner 
Guiseppe  Luca 
William  .\.  Lyday 
James  W.  Maddrey 
Frank  Maleazek 
Edwin  L.  Mertz 
George  B.  Nelson 
Jan  Nosal 
James  K.  Owens 
Mario  Patti 
Konstantv  Popielnichi 
Hal  J.  G.Pirtle 
Carter  H.  Pratt 


Zaharie  Radu 
Philip  D.  Reams 
Hampton  D.  Rice 
Peter  Roper 
Edgar  Sherrard 
Salvator  Sicogny 
Alexander  Shields 
Guy  A.  Silverthorn 
Frank  Slavis 
Alexander  Slawinski 
Edd  R.  Stelter 
.Mex.  Swartz 
Telleguino  Troncale 
Joseph  Trovato 
Jim  H.  Vaughan 
John  Waluck 
Hirvey  R.  Williams 
Eddie  P.  Yost 
Guido  Zanella 
Joseph  Zmijewski 


264 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


3rd  DEVELOPMENT  BATTALION,  165th  DEPOT  BRIGADE 


1st  Lieut.  Chas.  A.  Mackay 


12th  COMPANY 

Captain  Edgar  P.  Williston 
1st  Lieut.  Jack  Daniels 


2nd  Lieut.  Ernest  Schad 


1st  Sergeant 
General  J.  Murphy 

Sergeants 
Gabrial  A.  Murr 
George  Condon 
Charles  E.  Schwarz 
Edward  R.  Petri 
George  Sekulich 
William  R.  Rea 

Corporal 
Leslie  Shafer 


Privates — First  Class 
John  L.  Schwartz 
Mike  Poe 
Philip  Adams 

Privates 
Jose  G.  Archibeque 
Fidel  Apodaca 
Dominick  .^ngelone 
Isaac  Aldrete 
Torindo  Biasini 
Augustin  Bazan 
George  W.  Beard 
Jas.  H.  Bingham 


Jose  Boltram 
John  Burleson 
Homer  Crane 
Juan  Duran 
Gabino  Duran 
Hayward  F.  Edwards 
Frederico  Flores 
Leonard  D.  Gowers 
Jacoles  Gonzales 
Pedro  A   Girion 
Wex.  Goddy 
James  T   Gilley 
Jose  O.  Garcia 
Tony  Granato 
Luther  HowpII 


Candido  Hernandez 
Dometrio  D.  Herrera 
Tony  Junas 
Frank  Leganowitz 
Thomas  Luna 
Fcrnin  Mendez 
John  Mauro 
Antonio  Ortega 
John  J   O'Donell 
John  Pasqualone 
Louis  Riogas 
Georec  W.  Thorpe 
Bias  Sandoval 
Ora  Wheeler 
Pete  ^'oung 


265 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


1st  BATTALION,  165th  DEPOT  BRIGADE 


Lieut.  Jay  E.  Segar 


Lieut.  Charles  F.  Hartman 
Lieut.  Richard  E.  Wheeler 


2nd  COMPANY 
Captain  James  H.  Magowan 

Lieut.  James  X. 


Lieut.  Hubert  H. 


Hall 
Huffman 


Lieut.  Charles  Backes 


1st  Sergeant  David  H.  Frias 
Supply  Sergeant  Gerard  Harllee 

Sergeants 
Curtis  .Allen 
Sylvester  Swindle 
Willie  Williams 
Benjamin  .\dams 
George  Harllee 
Henry  Heightman 
Walter  Revada 
James  Wilkins 
Gtntry  Robinson 
John  Jeff 
Jefferson  Hale 


W.  O.  Woodward 
Wm.  H.  Martin 

Corporals 
Joe  Bradford 
Oscar  O'Brien 
Henry  Williams 
Releford  Olny 
Charlie  Grant 
Cephus  Smith 
Isaac  Spencer 
Nathan  Pendleton 
Dustral  Miller 
Elijah  Bowers 
Willie  Williams 
James  Hashway 
James  Caldwell 


Clarence  Gano 
Malcolm  Grace 
CuUen  E.  Taylor 
George  Singletar>' 
William  Gillohm 

Cooks 
Warick  .\bram 
.\be  Brown 
Eddie  Richard 
.\bner  West 

Buglers 
Edward  W.  Black 
Henrj'  Taylor 

Mechanic 
John  Judge  Tramble 


[266 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


1st  BATTALION,  165th  DEPOT  BRIGADE 


2nd  COMPANY 

Privates— First  Class 

Thomas  Brooks 

Sam  McEIroy 

Sylvester  Wilburn 

John  Blanchard 

Anthony  Tucker 

Tom  Pitts 

Elmon  Bacon 

Louis  Pipkins 

John  Chrisman 

Will  Childs 

Alex.  Pierce 

Hoalce  Moore 

Carl  Coleman 

Earl  Roberson 

Ellis  Smith 
Travis  Branch 
August  Mooney 
Searcy  Ratliffe 

Drew  Coleman 
Charlie  Duren 
Henry  Dickson 

Arthur  Smith 

Ed.  Shaw 

John  H.  Thomas 

Leonard  Shanklin 

Jimmie  Franklin 

Griffin  Thomas 

Leeland  Krause 

Frank  HoUins 

Haddie  Upshaw 

Julious  Saunders 

Jesse  Henderson . 

Emil  Williams 

Charles  Buckner 

Howard  Hamilton 

Jim  Williams 

Will  Howard 

Will  Ivey 

James  A.  Williams 

fohnnie  Story 

Earl  Josey 

George  Williams 

Herman  Jackson 

Emzy  Washington 

Privates 

John  Keath 

Lloyd  C.  Wilson 

Homer  Allen 

Wilburn  Leviston 

Willie  Wallace 

Bub  Batey 

Atchison  McFarland 

Ben.  Williams 

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CAMP    TRAVIS    AND    THE    WORLD    WAR 


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268 


CAMP    TRAVIS     AND    THE     WORLD    WAR 


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CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


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11th  COMPANY,  3rd  BATTALION,  16oth  DEPOT  BRIGADE 


270 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


nth  COMPANY,  3rd  BATTALION,  165th  DEPOT  BRIGADE 


271 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


21st  COMPANY,  165th  DEPOT  BRIGADE 

1st  Lieut.  Arthur  C.  Smyth 
2nd  Lieut.  Frederick  H.  Johnson  2nd  Lieut.  Kenneth  F.  Fenton 


Sergeants 
Gustaves  M.  Gates  (white) 
Jack  B.  Heam  (white) 
Ferdinand  Kuehne  (white) 

Corporals 

Harry  B.  Jackson  (white) 
Dewey  Bess 
Charlie  B  levins 
Raymond  Bradley 
Howard  P.  Carter 
Hicks  Davis 
Charles  W.  Ferrell 
Jack  Garrett 
Charles  J.  Howard 
John  M.  Kemper 


Charlie  McMillan 
James  Miller 
Emial  Price 
Fred  D.  Roach 

Cooks 
Robert  Cross 
Macon  G.  Ganter 

Privates 
Toy  Askew 
Dock  Branch 
Thomas  L.  Bunch 
Charlie  Barry 
Sidney  Brooks 
Deleon  Brooks 


Riley  Brown 
Ira  Black 
Lee  Collins 
George  Collins 
Arthur  Cossie 
George  Clay 
James  E.  Clark 
David  D.  Campbell 
Bennie  Davis 
Edward  Eaton 
Henry  Foster 
Willie  Floyd 
Thomas  L.  Ford 
Clarence  Punches 
Noah  Forward 
Thair  Fisher 
Amett  Fisher 


Will  Gray 
John  L.  Guess 
John  Green 
Rafe  Hallum 
William  Harper 
Hirlton  Huey 
William  Henry 
March  HaU 
T.  Jones 
Henry  P.  Joseph 
James  Lee 
Lawrence  Moss 
John  McCall 
Whitmon  McClendon 
Albert  McMurry 
John  D.  Moore 
Ed  Ira  Neal 


Clarence  Nelson 
John  Norwood 
John  Orgain 
Tommie  Phillips 
Charles  Pleasant 
Jim  Reggie 
Smart  R.  Robinson 
William  Reeves 
Randall  Smith 
Herman  Smith 
Bennie  Sparrow 
Ed  Stanley 
Henry  Standifer 
Curtis  Stephens 
James  Tennon 
Humphrey  Watson 


22nd  COMPANY,  165th  DEPOT  BRIGADE 


1st  Lieut.  John  P.  Cox 


Sergeants 
Aubrey  Rudasill 
Spencer  E.  Carradine 
John  K.  Dillard 
Reatherford  D.  McQuarry 

Privates — First  Class 
James  W.  Brewster 
Smith  Bundage 
Laney  Frazoer 
Homer  Hostin 
Cozy  Ingram 
Arthur  L.  Lewis 
King  Little 
Willie  McKinney 
Hubbard  M.  Rambo 


Jim  Rodgers 
John  C.  Roy 
William  H.  Simpson 
John  B.  Thomas 
Johnnie  Thomas 
Warren  Ware 
Willie  Wilborn 
Mannie  J.  Williams 
Lee  B.  Wilson 

Privates 
Feldon  Abrons 
Oren  Booth 
Prince  E.  Bradlye 
Elton  Browder 
Elbert  Campbell 


Captain  Jules  O.  LeBlanc,  Jr. 
2d  Lieut.  Eugene  E.  Garrett 

Joe  Clifton 
Frank  Cooper 
M.  L.  Dilworth 
Jerry  England 
Henrv  Fisher 
Gerald  C.  Ford 
Willie  Fowler 
Raleigh  L.  Grace 
George  Harris 
Sherman  Jackson 
Andrew  Johnson 
Clem  Johnson 
Ed  Johnson 
Jesse  J.  Johnson 
Josh  C.  Kemard 
Jerry  McElroy 


2d  Lieut.  Albert  G.  Griffith 

Add  Merriweather 
Willie  MillhoUand 
Dan  Oliver 
Burnett  W.  Penn 
George  A.  Phillips 
James  F.  Pirtle 
Mathew  Pleasant 
Carter  Potts 
Oscar  Rand 
Richard  Randle 
Charles  RoUerson 
Harrison  Rucker 
John  Scott 
Gentry  Sears 
Lewey  .\.  Simmons 
Solomon  Smith 


Charlie  Snell 
Sam  Snell 
Randall  Sowells 
George  Taylor 
John  N.  Taylor 
Ed  Tryon 
George  E.  Turner 
Ralph  L.  Turner 
Jim  H.  Walker 
Ben  Washington 
Clarence  O.  Williams 
Roger  Williams 
Walter  Williams 
Willie  Williams 
-Abe  ^\'ooldridge 
Johnnie  Young 


272  1 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


23rd  COMPANY,  165th  DEPOT  BRIGADE 


1st  Lieut.  George  C.  Benedict 


Captain  Frederick  P.  Warber 
2nd  Lieut.  August  P.  Roth 


2nd  Lieut.  Chesterfield  G.  Gunn 


Sergeants 

Absy  Ecter 

Lewis  Cook 

Thomas  Edwards 

Willie  Robinson 

Ea:l  Keller 

WiUie  Felder 

Charlie  Dors 

Henry  Jennings 

J.  C.  Spencer 

Thomas  C.  Scott 

Rotan  Mims 

La%vrence  L.  Davis 

Elia  Johnson 

Arthur  Sanders 

Norman  B.  Woods 

George  Compton 

James  Johnson 

Joe  Sanders 

Corporals 

Frank  Zachry 

Collie  Foster 

Ethel  B.  Jones 

James  Silar 

Oscar  McCorkie 

Charlie  E.  Gray 

Abraham  Lee 

George  Simpson 

Charlie  Cavil 

Privates 

Arthur  Green 

Dick  Lewis 

Nelson  Sincere 

Maymon  Hodges 

James  Anderson 

Harrison  Green 

Connie  B.  Lee 

Shelley  Stallion 

Edgar  J.  Dostie 

Hilliard  Ballard 

Thomas  Groves 

Willie  0.  Loggins 

Leonard  Thompson 

Dan  Hood 

Alfred  Benton 

Mert  A.  Hampton 

Theodric  H.  Loud 

King  Young 

Walter  B.  Barnard 

Leonard  Hart 

Timothy  McCoy 

John  H.  Boone 

Privates — First  Class 

OUie  Burley 

Earl  J.  Hamilton 

Eugene  McKinley 

Eddie  C.  Carr 

James  Casey 

Will  Hines 

Horace  Mills 

Cook 

George  W.  Coleman 

Dude  Christian 

Milton  Howard 

Orlandor  Moore 

Willie  Norris 

Emmett  J.  Jones 

Will  Cobbs 

Arthur  Hunnicutt 

Elvin  Moton 

Raymond  Shakleford 

Bernie  CoUier 

Louis  B.  Ivry 

Marshall  Owens 

Mechanic 

Willie  Carr 

James  W.  Collins 

Walter  Jackson 

K.  C.  Phillips 

Richard  Norville 

1st  Lieut.  Howard  S.  Jenkins 
Sergeants 


24th  COMPANY,  165th  DEPOT  BRIGADE 

Captain  William  A.  Colling 
1st  Lieut.  Carter  S.  Baldwin  2d  Lieut.  William  P.  Hall 


Jesse  .\.  Livingston 
Fred  H.  Budke 
Harry  W.  Hennersdorf 
Russell  M.  Pryor 

Corporals 

Johnnie  Fields 
Alvin  C.  Hill 
Tossaint  Patton 
Albert  Coss 
Joseph  Thomas 
Jefferson  Bird 
Henry  Harrell 
Joe  Iverson  Hutchins 


Cooks 

L.  E.  Hart 
Major  Tunson 

Privates 

Earl  Andrews 
Sylvester  Bass 
John  W.  Baker 
Garfield  Bowen 
Lonnie  Cannon 
Fred  Carroll 
Ruben  Cawthorn 
James  A.  Charles 
Dempsey  Collins 
Louis  Coleman 


James  W.  Craig 
John  Cooper 
Buster  Davis 
Robert  Davis 
Dave  Davis 
Sam  Ealey 
Joe  W.  Floyd 
John  Flowers 
Lee  Ford 
Calvin  Golden 
Floyd  Grant 
Lu  James  Griffin 
Joe  (irimes 
Herbert  H.  Gannon 
Richard  Hacerty 
Otis  Hampton 
Clarence  A.  Hall 


Walter  Harris 
Levi  Harris 
Elmer  Houston 
Johnnie  Hopkins 
Clay  Howard 
Columbus  Jackson 
Robert  Johnson 
Willie  Jasper 
Leon  Johnson 
Lucius  Johnson 
Willie  Jones 
John  Henry  Jones 
Nehimer  Jones 
Roy  Kellough 
Manzic  Lee 
Willie  Mosely 
Phillip  Mack 


2d  Lieut.  Bert  L.  Hubbell 

Dewitt  Miles 
Jesse  Moses 
Mitchell  Minor 
John  D.  Nelson 
Herman  Payne 
Cornelius  Patterson 
Cecil  E.  Rowe 
Claude  Shelton 
Tobe  Stewart 
Vernal  Steel 
Andrew  Stevenson 
Johnnie  Targton 
Levi  Thomas 
Nathaniel  Taylor 
Cleveland  Thomas 
Willie  Walker 
Lockett  Wade 


273 


CAMP    TRAVIS     AND    THE    WORLD    WAR 


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Depot  Brigade  Pictures 


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CAMP    TRAVIS     AND    THE     WORLD    WAR 


UTILITIES  DETACHMENT 


Major  William  B.  Tuttle 
Captain  Elmer  S.  Armstrong 
Captain  Cadwallader  M.  Barr 
Captain  James  C.  Kennedy 

Q.  M.  Sergeants,  Senior  Grade 
Adolph  Dixon 
Robert  L.  Berryman 

Q.  M.  Sergeant 
William  M.  Garvey 

Sergeants — First  Class 
Alphonse  Schaefer 
James  A.  Bemis 
James  W.  Stewart 
Fleetwood  R.  Bracey 
Mack  Johns 
Robert  W.  Schroeder 
Asa  R.  Lewis 
William  S.  Cameron 
Will  P.  Lawson 
Harry  F.  Duncan,  Jr. 
RoUie  E.  Bond 
Berry  A.  Rader 
Jasper  C.  Roberson 
Wallace  Archibald 
James  G.  HajTies 
Theodore  E.  Heckman 
Amos  W.  Marriott 
Marshall  M.  Robinson 

Sergeants 
Jack  Grain 
Louis  Greif 
William  P.  Sweigart 
Roger  A.  Heard 
Charles  W.  Hanchett 
Alvaro  Vaiani 
Carl  Riggs 

Benjamin  W.  Bamett 
Harry  T.  Choice 


Captain  John  J.  Connelly 
1st  Lieut.  John  S.  Denike 
1st  Lieut.  Frank  E.  Laramey 
1st  Lieut.  James  W.  Wyse 


1st  Lieut.  Byron  C.  Dunlap 
2nd  Lieut.  Ernest  S.  Alderman 
2nd  Lieut.  Guenther  H.  Froebel 
2nd  Lieut.  James  J.  Garvey 


2nd  Lieut.  William  H.  Nelson 
2nd  Lieut.  Mortimer  L.  Diver 
2nd  Lieut.  Edward  Stokes 


William  O.  Wilbanks 
Willard  S.  Shepherd 
Wallace  W.  Wynn 
Henry  Giesbrecht 
Walter  B.  Walker 
James  W.  Reagan 
Fred  J.  Smithers 
Jim  A.  Trammel 
Homer  L.  Gebhart 
Emmet  A.  Bunch 
Edwin  J.  Barbour 
Joseph  T.  Davis 
Benjamin  F.  Darby 
John  J.  Durkin 
Earl  E.  Hughes 
Mark  M.  Curry 
John  HiU 
George  F.  Maddox 
Curtis  Robertson 
Ralph  L.  James 
Robert  E.  Doty 
Mark  T.  Smith 
Robert  B.  Boggess 
Marshall  L.  Waugh 
Christopher  C.  Springer 
Horace  R.  Price 
Ivy  H  Lutts 
John  W.  Hill 
John  O.  Fanning 
Adren  C.  Evans 
Herbert  Forbes 
William  E.  Shoup 
Earl  Chinski 
Grover  C.  Lambert 
Earnest  W.  Curran 
Charles  L.  Caldwell 
William  Graham 


Andrew  Lee 
Elmer  C.  E.  Looff 
Gersham  Green 
Luther  D.  Tucker 
John  W.  King 
James  W.  Sanders 
Charles  W.  Brownfield 
Patrick  J.  Conway 
David  A.  Lown 
Charles  D.  Bridgman 
Oscar  Grebe 
Jacob  Levy 
Samuel  B.  Greer 
Claude  O.  McAllister 
Louis  J.  Fink,  Jr. 
Edgar  L.  Newton 
Solomon  R.  McCIuskey 
Joseph  H.  Lahey 
Walton  P.  Watts 
Henry  Parker 
Charlie  W.  Miller 
Ambrose  C.  Wedemeyer 
George  V.  Hogwood 
Herman  Weber 
William  B.  Zimmer 
Frank  S.  Robison 
Max  R.  Juran 
Paul  A.  H.  Jorgenson 
Thomas  M.  Hayes 
Addis  E.  Noonan 
Philip  D.  Hatma 
Harris  C.  Zachry 
Thomas  M.  Cullum.  Jr. 
Hugo  O.  Borgfeld 
Leo  E.  Stewart 
John  W.  Stubblefield 
Elmer  F.  Varvil 


Will  A.  Brown 
Clem.  Edwards 
George  H.  Hall 
Julius  Bowman 
William  T.  Damaby 
David  E.  Kirkland 
John  Erickson 
Ray  H.  Cavender 
James  M.  Brouillette 
Hubert  E.  Curington 
Arthur  McGinty 
Herbert  E.  Wheeler 
Walter  P.  Horlock 
Andrew  J.  Griffith 
George  F.  Dullnig 
Manuel  C.  Garcia 
Albert  A.  Klockman 
Joe  Garza 
Ben.  Echols 
Pierce  Bogart 
Arthur  E.  Blount 
Walter  G.  Lamb 
Charles  A.  Bellegie 
Steve  N.  Dehart 
Ralph  C.  Carter 
Louis  Sammer 
John  Massey 
James  B.  Scott,  Jr. 
John  G.  Vicars 
WiUiam  B.  Collier 
William  E.  Hausman 
John  B.  Ohlson 
William  B.  Love 
Walton  L.  Measles 
Lester  D.  Miller 
Albert  E.  Rainwater 
Arthur  Stipe 


John  M.  Lewis 
Reinhardt  F.  Richter 
Thomas  Ross 
Lawrence  Pierron 
Robert  T.  Wilson 
David  W.  Penner 
Gus  J.  Wild.  Jr. 
Chriss  S.  Barber 
John  A.  Clayton 
Lester  L.  Prud'homme 
Edward  S.  Watkins 
Leon  C.  Bissett 
James  W.  Boyce 
Claud  Hopper 
John  R.  Broesquin 
Theodore  J.  Kommayer 
Oscar  B.  Monier 
Lester  E.  Eckart 
Morton  F.  Moore 
Elmer  J.  Pearl 
Albert  T.  Feeney 

Corporals 
John  A.  Firth 
William  N.  Oakman 
Merle  Kessler 
Ben  H.  Murphy 
Gustave  G.  Epp 
Joseph  B.  Williams 
Ernest  M.  Banzet 
Tom  E.  Beaird 
Floyd  A.  Myers 
Charles  P.  Boyce 
Ernest  J.  Martie 
Augustine  Chapa 
Leon  C.  Henkes 
William  C.  Oliver 


276 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


Rafael  A.  Salazar 
William  H.  Hafer 
Ben  W.  Griffin 
Harry  McCracken 
Charles  V.  Archerd 
Charles  H.  Douglas 
Otis  O.  Knox 
James  L.  Shanahan 
David  R.  Black 
John  A.  Linn 
Dallis  F.  Parker 
CHnton  A.  Black 
William  J.  Brouse 
Walter  H.  Stephan 
Erma  L.  Thornton 
Robert  W.  Ward 
Edwin  J.  Greenough 
Walter  C.  Evans 
Robert  C.  Truitt 
Thomas  J.  House 
Sylvester  C.  TuUos 
Owen  B.  Lowe 
Charles  E.  Hott 
WiUiam  R.  Anderson 
Thomas  E.  Matheney 
Fred  Laughlin 
Daniel  J.  CuUen 
James  W.  McMichacl 
Colvin  L.  McMahon 
Cecil  C.  Brister 
Porter  A.  Pickel 
Noah  J.  Shofner 


James  D.  Simonton 
Hubert  C.  Smith 
Carroll  C.  Hardin 
Louis  L  Wolf 
Willis  C.  Wright 
Robis  G.  Albers 
Martin  L.  Smith 
Walter  B.  Rider 
Harry  E.  Robinson 
Otto  G.  Beck 
Edward  Cepeda 
Henry  ZoUer 
Edgar  A.  Dobbin 
James  C.  Davis 

Privates — First  Class 
Eugene  Boyd 
Leon  C.  Fredenburg 
Arthur  Holland 
Amos  L.  Keith 
Carmine  Marinelli 
Omar  Martin 
John  T.  Reagan 
Harry  L.  Smith 
Homer  E.  Torbutt 
Francis  J.  Williams 
Walter  L.  Zahl 
James  R.  Tale 
Charles  F.  Suehrstedt 
Ford  H.  Thomason 
James  W.  Spitzfaden 
Barney  L.  Weaver 


UTILITIES  DETACHMENT 
Bibb  H.  Martin 


Privates 
Ruby  K.  Acklin 
Clifton  Adams 
George  Akers 
Charles  E.  Allard 
Jesse  P.  Allen 
John  S.  Allen 
Willie  A.  AUen 
James  G.  Alley 
John  Anderson 
Claud  L.  Archbell 
Luther  G.  Atchley 
Joseph  Baggaley 
George  D.  Bass 
Peter  P.  Baumkratz 
Henry  Becker 
Jesse  L.  Beebe 
Able  Benevides 
John  Bernnard 
Joseph  L.  Best 
Robert  M.  Best 
Looney  J.  Bevers 
Joseph  Bezdick 
Martin  Birkland 
Carl  E.  Bjork 
William  F.  Black 
Albert  M.  Blanchet 
Luther  L.  Blevens 
Guy  E.  Blockcolsky 
Roy  D.  Boatwright 


Carl  Boll 
Oscar  P.  Borders 
Frank  Bordovsky,  Jr. 
Henry  A.  Brewster 
Elmer  A.  W.  Bringer 
Idas  J.  Broach 
Olie  O.  Brough 
Wayne  Brown 
George  A.  Brunner 
Robert  0.  Buck 
Philip  A.  Buteaud 
Patrick  Cagney 
Francisco  Cardenas 
Angelo  Carmelo 
Roy  M.  Carrillo 
Joseph  P.  Carroll 
William  H.  Casey 
Quantrell  Caudle 
Victoriano  T.  Cepeda 
Bart.  Chandler 
Emmit  J.  Chandler 
Johnson  J.  Chargois 
WiUiam  Chmelar 
JuUus  B.  Christian 
Domenick  Cimino 
James  I.  Clair 
Joseph  A.  Clarke 
George  W.  Claxton 
Chester  G.  Clifford 
Jaudon  Cole 
John  B.  Collins 
Ambers  L.  Colvin 


Joseph  M.  Connell 
Reubin  A.  Covington 
Robert  L.  Covington 
Ruby  R.  Couch 
William  V.  Coursey 
John  L.  Cozart 
David  V.  Cram 
Manuele  Crivello 
Houston  J.  Crocker 
Sephus  L.  Crouell 
James  F.  Crow 
Lowell  Cude 
Juan  F.  Cuellar 
Lenwood  C.  Cullems 
Lee  Culver 
Elias  Curnutt 
John  Dalicandro 
Lonnie  Daniels 
Fred  Davidson 
Harry  E.  Davis 
Wilbern  Davis 
Arthur  P.  Day 
William  J.  Day 
Harold  F.  Deckshott 
William  J.  DeFreese 
Sylvan  Delfosse 
Seaburn  C.  Delk 
Leo  DeSantis 
elide  Dickerson 
Joseph  C.  Dickey 
James  E.  Dodgen 
Homer  R.  Dodson 


277 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR. 


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Hugh  Dorman 
Marco  Dotta 
Robert  J.  Dowling 
Joe  T.  Duke 
Mike  Dukti 
Guy  F.  Duncan 
James  Duncan 
Benjamin  E.  Dunsworth 
William  E.  Eason 
David  E.  Eastman 
John  H.  Eaton 
Louis  L.  Eckerman 
Kamel  Ede 
Glen  Embrey 
Johnie  Ernest 
Seferino  Espinosa 
Vasil  Evanoff 
John  Evans 
Cecil  A.  Everett 
David  N.  Faulkner 
Frank  A.  Faulkner 
John  M.  Feeley 
Guy  Fellows 
George  H.  Feuerbacher 


John  E.  Fitch 
Henry  X.  Fitzgerald 
Martinez  Florek 
Juan  Flores 
Ruby  R.  Flud 
Edward  T.  Fonteno 
Rufus  L.  Foster 
J.  B.  Francis.  Jr. 
Iris  W.  FrankUn 
Bennie  F.  French 
WiUiam  B.  Fr>' 
Louis  Funks 
Major  Garrard 
Hilliard  S.  Garrett 
James  M.  Geihsler 
Steve  Goegites 
John  T.  Glass 
Escar  S.  Goins 
John  W.  Gordon 
Van  Gore 
Paul  F.  Graeber 
William  H.  Graham 
Frank  Grant 
Horace  W.  Green 


UTILITIES  DETACHMENT 

Julius  L.  Grisham 
Julius  B.  Grupe 
John  C.  Gunter 
Paul  W.  Guynn 
John  A.  Hagar 
Alonzo  Hall 
Ba-"cter  Harrison  Hall 
John  Hamilton 
Hubert  G.  Harp 
Hite  T.  Harper 
WilUam  R.  Harper 
Claude  M.  Harris 
Harvey  E.  Harris 
Rufus  E.  Harrison 
Warren  R.  Harrison 
Bill  W.  Hart 
WiUiam  Hartgroves 
Jennings  B.  Harvey 
John  P.  Heame 
CharUe  L.  Hester 
Edware  R.  Hill 
Ira  Hooker 
Grover  C.  Horn 
Arnold  J.  Houy 


Felix  A.  Houy 
Jessie  R.  Howell 
James  \V.  Hubba 
Thomas  L.  Hudgins 
Elmer  .\.  Huffman 
Charles  E.  Hughes 
Herbert  Hunter 
Samuel  H.  Hyatt 
Clarence  E.  Jackson 
Alex  F.  Jagiolka 
James  A.  Jarboe 
Guy  P.  JarreU 
Millard  Jefferson 
Louis  M.  Jemigan 
Wallace  S.  Jemigan 
Ejinio  Jiron 
Fred  A.  Johnson 
Alonzo  L.  Jones 
Richard  J.  Jones 
Thomas  G.  C.  Joyney 
Robert  F.  Kamei 
Joe  Kassler 
Ben  M.  Kelly 
Marshall  M.  Kelly 


Herman  B.  Keys 
Durward  W.  Kirby 
John  A  J.  Kleba 
Joseph  Klug 
.Abraham  H.  Knoch 
Frank  Koetting 
.\doIph  Kohlstruck 
Eddie  H.  Korth 
Otto  Koske 
Charles  E.  Kraemer 
LawTence  B.  Kramer 
John  F.  Krieger 
Louis  Krohn 
Frank  Krumtinger 
Frank  Kujawa 
Karl  P.  Kunkel 
Joseph  Kurena 
Fred  L.  Landers 
WilUam  C.  Landrxmi 
Clarence  E.  Landtroop 
Ben  W.  Lanum 
Nels  Larson 
James  B.  Lawrence 
Continued  on  page  317 


278 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


CAMP  MEDICAL  SUPPLY  DEPOT  DETACHMENT 


2nd  Lieut,  James  F.  Pershing,  Jr. 
2nd  Lieut.  Otto  E,  Kietchmer 


Sergeants 
Charles  E.  D.  Bland 
Harry  H.  McKee 
WajTie  Riley 

Privates — First  Class 
Earl  N.  Foulds 
Saul  Gordon 


Captain  Samuel  H.  Leopold 

1st  Sergeant  John  G.  McConnell 
1st  Sergeant  Luther  G.  Porter 


1st  Sergeant  Ernest  W.  Whitaker 
1st  Sergeant  Lawrence    G,    Thurman 


Charles  F.  Herbert 
Sol  Littman 
Joseph  Schick 
Joseph  Schneider 
Mortimer  Ulmann 

Privates 
David  Falasca 


Henry  W.  Hardin 
Benjamin  Kornblum 
Herman  I.  Lifshitz 
James  N.  Mulligan 
Arthur  J,  J.  Murphy 
Mark  H.  Nelson 
William  A.  Patrick 
Ernest  G.  H.  Schrank 


Thomas  D.  Straughn 
Uriah  M,  Tadlock 
LoweU  L.  Wilkes 
Leo  E.  Wunsch 
Alfred  Ziegler 


279 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


;•»            >      A     A    1^                . 

''■*''*'•''    *«tti-i;''    »^'!^«'|pp<'V'' 

^s 

QUAklEKilASTER  CORPS  DETACHMENT 


Major  Albert  Lobitz 
Major  Gilbert  H.  Goosey 
Captain  Earl  H.  Eddleman 
Captain  Frank  D.  Wheeler 
Captain  Marsona  M.  Murray 
Captain  John  W.  King 
1st  Lieut.  Edward  B.  McSwain 
2nd  Lieut.  Charles  W.  Ardery 


2nd  Lieut. 
2nd  Lieut. 
2nd  Lieut. 
2nd  Lieut. 
2nd  Lieut. 
2nd  Lieut. 
2nd  Lieut. 
2nd  Lieut. 


Charles  C.  Gray 
Paul  M.  Mohnicern 
Foster  H.  Bunkley 
Oran  R.  Charlton 
Clyde  V.  Ford 
Ben  A.  Ligon 
Fred  Mayer 
William  M.  Gallagher 


2nd  Lieut.  Raymond  V.  Rinehart 
2nd  Lieut.  Henry  F.  Raube 
2nd  Lieut.  Arthur  Korschal 
2nd  Lieut.  Aloysius  B.  Bradley 
2nd  Lieut.  George  Novich 
2nd  Lieut.  John  R.  Galbraith 
First  Sergeant  Paul  Tietz 


Quartermaster  Sergeants 
Senior  Grade 

Walter  W.  Edwards 
Dick  Bateman 
Frank  M.  Degasperi,  Jr. 
Letoy  Albrecht 

Quartermaster  Sergeants 

Kenneth  S.  Wingate 
Joseph  B.  Huslage 
Thomas  D.  Quinn 

Sergeants — First  Class 

Samuel  P.  Redish 
Claude  A.  Hargis 
Charles  T.  Marx,  Jr. 
Joseph  Stahl 
Ambrose  T.  Curran 
Arleigh  L.  Martin 
Allen  Powell 
John  B.  Millsepps 
Francisco  J.  Cadena 
Fred  Jaggi 
George  H.  Phillips 
Ray  A.  Smith 
Ben  S.  Avant 
Paul  J.  Leske 
Henry  F.  Dreyer 
Frederick  A.  Bryan 
Edward  J.  Bedding 
James  G.  Home 
Emory  C.  Callender 
Emmet  C.  Patton 
Thomas  E.  Craddock 
Harmon  Ebey 


Edward  S.  Bond 
Rector  G.  Proctor 
Charles  Eidelberg 
Robert  S.  Cockerel! 
Garvin  C.  Legan 
Aubrey  J.  Brown 
Benjamin  W.  Nuhn 
Oliver  P.  Luther 
John  A.  Guntle 
Roy  W.  Quillin 
Peyton  C.  Roscoe 
Earl  V.  Bull 
Roy  Broadway 
Thomas  J.  Maloney 
John  H.  Vesper 
Ralph  T.  Bruce 
Claude  E.  Benton 
Clarence  B.  Ligon 
Harold  W.  Corke 
Hugo  J.  Holzmann 
Benjamin  E.  SchoU 
Bemice  C.  Claunch 
Cecil  E.  Clark 
William  A.  Richards 
Isaac  E.  Larrabee 
Alphons  D.  Nuhn 
Ross  Hoover 
Harold  O.  Whitfield 
Homer  F.  Wicker 
William  E.  Killough 
Arthur  Sandfield 
Harry  L.  Haberkom 

Sergeants 
John  0.  O'Connor 
John  R.  Cheatham 


Walter  E.  Sjoberg 
Abraham  Weinberg 
Hector  L.  Garcia 
Charles  Mueller 
John  H.  Boone 
George  L.  Sawyer 
Milton  J,  Schinitt 
Adolphus  P.  Dowell 
Harry  L.  Dail 
Isaac  S.  Cbadick 
Thomas  D.  Saathoff 
Otho  E.  Evans 
Louis  Jaffe 
David  S.  Reed 
John  C.  Mclntyre 
Benjamin  C.  Carr 
Walter  L.  Kinser 
Hugo  F.  Priess 
Arthur  T.  Castle 
John  A.  McMahon 
John  J.  McLaughlin 
Roland  G.  Stratton 
Fred  R.  Donohoo 
Roscoe  Arnold 
Claude  D.  Coe 
WiUiam  A.  Cox 
Rob  R.  MacGregor 
Herman  C.  Herbsleb 
Richard  A.  Ludwig 
James  J.  Weems 
Clarence  J.  Baldwin 
Luther  J.  Bivens 
Martin  McCarthy 
Walter  S.  Hunter 
Joseph  A.  Urrey 
Robert  S.  Burtt 


Ayrl  H.  McNeese 
Alfred  J.  Lenzen 

Corporals 
Julius  W.  Picaman 
William  L.  Oldham 
Edgar  F.  Wallhoefer 
Oran  R.  Sadler 
Samuel  B.  Bales 
Loney  W.  Yeager 
Charles  Eckert 
George  W.  Clift 
Thomas  J.  Dockery 
Felix  F.  Schmitz 
Grover  C.  Cummings 
Garland  A.  Smelser 
Andrew  M.  Lojo 
James  M.  Scudder 
Henry  W.  Holtz 
George  S.  Howard 
Arthur  Hornbacher 
Cornelius  Hergert 
Robert  G.  Hubonette 
Walter  E.  Gerberick 
Stanley  L.  Martin 
Charles  B.  Pizzini 
WiUiam  C.  Day 
Herbert  L.  Kauffmann 
Archie  Solomon 
Curtis  Deason 
Owen  Ellis 
Raymond  D.  Meeks 
Thomas  B.  Grimes 
William  V.  Pedigo 
Nelvin  L.  Tampke 
Continued  on  page  316 


280 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


^-""-'T 


,^^CT'''-^^, 


CONSERVATION  AND   RFXLAMATTON  CO.MI'AXV 


1st  Lieut.  Charles  E.  Richardson 
2nd  Lieut.  George  O.  Garrison        2nd  Lieut.  John  Lightburn 


1st  Lieut.  Raymond  P.  Whitfield 
2nd  Lieut.  Robert  F.  Johnson         2nd  Lieut.  Thomas  Chapman 


Sergeants — First  Class 
Richard  H.  Thornton 
Hamilton  C.  Stoirie 
Victor  W.  Faber 
Claude  J.  Kelley 
Fred  T.  Robinson 
Cleo  C.  Walker 
Leslie  I.  Ray 

Sergeants 
Edward  1.  Raymond 
James  R.  Moss 
Alfred  H.  Meyer 
Morris  Barkin 
Louis  B.  Nathan 
Earl  E.  C.  Beck 
Henr>'  T.  Rector 
Carl  Slaughter 
Harry  J.  Raybould 
Louis  N.  Kaufmann 
Ray  V.  Hyatt 
George  D.  McCormick 

Corporals 
Charles  H.  Carpenter 
Aubrey  V.  Magill 
Thomas  W.  Williams 
Charles  E.  Werkheiser 
Theodore  J.  Clark 
Elmer  E.  Bills 
Newton  H.  Greene 
Elmer  L.  Young 
Cecil  May 
Grooms  L.  Carleton 
Willdie  Stephens 
James  L.  Ham 
Thomas  J.  DeHeart 
Louis  Donohoo 
Herschel  R.  Hu.T 

Wagoners 
John  J.  Bracewell 
Charley  C.  Carvei 
Oliver  C.  Clark 


Farris  G.  Ledford 
Louis  G.  Ledegar 
Albert  Toll 

Privates — First  Class 
Esrael  Abramson 
Henry  Block 
David  A.  Bruton 
Erick  W.  Carlson 
Lynn  M.  Cox 
ililton  A.  Davis 
Felix  W.  Edelbrook 
Harry  Feinstein 
Jose  L.  Flores 
Nathan  Goldsmith 
Joe  Goot 
Frank  Gottholt 
Henry  I.  Hahn 
John  Ihrie 
Will  A.  Knight 
Ruba  L.  Lane 
Clarence  Lodovic 
Joe  M.  Michalik 
Vito  Musso 
Marshall  H.  Rhodes 
Jesse  T.  Roach 
Joseph  Rubin 
Michael  Scalora 
Fritz  T.  H.  Schmueckle 
Dave  P.  TuUos 
James  H.  Wallace 

Privates 
Paul  Adams 
Juan  Aguilarr 
William  L.  Anderson 
John  Apostolas 
George  W.  Arnold 
Raymond  H.  Austin 
Earl  L.  Bailey 
Dee  A.  Barr 
Elmer  V.  Barron 
Joe  W.  Batla 


Gustav  F.  Bauch,  Jr. 
Thomas  C.  Btll 
Walter  A.  Bell 
Alfred  A.  Belz 
Charles  E.  Bertch 
Marsilio  Bianchi 
Walter  Bierstedt 
Ernest  E.  Bishop 
Sotiries  G.  Bores 
Lovid  D.  Bozeman 
.\ndrew  Brashears 
Jesse  E.  Brewer 
William  Buddenburg 
Guy  M.  Butler 
John  R.  Cade 
James  W.  Callahan 
Alejandro  Canales 
Anton  F.  Carlson 
Erick  A.  R.  Clason 
Jess  D.  Cole 
Sam  J.  Cole 
Bartlett  Collins 
Albert  L.  Costo 
John  R.  Cozby 
Luther  M.  Curbo 
Edward  Dandurand 
Hayes  Deaver 
William  E.  Denby 
Edwin  J.  Dick 
Henry  F.  Dick 
Elmer  E.  Dickens 
Noel  A.  Dickson 
JuUus  J.  Dittmar 
Phillip  Dorf 
Willie  Dreibrodt 
Joe  B.  Drevvery 
James  A.  Earp 
Daniel  F.  Eichraan 
Fred  F.  Eichman 
John  T.  Filers 
Loyce  G.  Estes 
Roy  L.  Eubanks 


Fred  H.  Evans 
James  W.  L.  Faulkenberry 
Agostino  Fenili 
Vern  E.  Fisher 
Alfred  J.  FoUey 
Floyd  W.  Fortner 
Roy  E.  Freeman 
William  Frink 
Francisco  Garza 
Adolph  Gleinser 
Bud  Gilbreth 
Benno  H.  Gold 
Richard  A.  GoU 
Martin  Goltermann 
Stenli  Graczak 
Ernest  F.  Green 
Clyde  V.  Gregg 
Roper  C.  Griffith 
Martin  Hansen 
Alfred  A.  Hardt 
Raymond  D.  Harlan 
Isaac  B.  Hass 
Allison  W.  Hatcher 
Gilbert  R.  Hay 
William  H.  Hempfling 
Troy  H.  Henry 
Paul  L.  Hess 
Ernest  F.  Harms 
Maurice  G.  Hooter 
Henry  F.  Huber 
Emil  Jepsen 
Pedro  Jimenez 
Earl  R.  Johnson 
George  D.  Johnson 
Ralph  B.  Johnson 
Kenneth  E.  Jolliff 
Grover  C.  Jones 
James  W.  Jones 
Rudolph  Kanetzky 
Thomas  B.  Kellum 
Charles  O.  Kinzie 
Jesse  Lemberth 


Karl  F.  Lapp 
Dimitro  Latsos 
Fred  E.  Lesley 
Everett  L.  Lindscy 
Marion  S.  Lucas 
Norman  Lunday 
Oscar  0.  Manghan 
Joe  W.  Marek 
William  F.  Marlatt 
Thomas  E.  May 
Daniel  Majia 
Narciso  G.  Mejia 
Bert  Middleton 
Edward  Mikeska 
Johnie  L.  Mitchell 
James  A.  Moore 
Joseph  D.  MueUer 
Thomas  W.  Mullins 
John  A.  McCurry 
Floy  McLendon 
Louis  Nedbalek 
Isom  E.  B.  Nelson 
Carl  Newton 
Otis  A.  Pace 
Joe  V.  Parsley 
Leon  Peters 
Sidney  Pink 
Eli  Ploch 
Roy  M.  Quick 
Charles  K.  Radzikowski 
John  Rand 
Robert  R.  Rankin 
Arnold  H.  Reichle 
John  H.  Reid 
Brijido  Reyes 
Leo  D.  Richards 
Carl  W.  Riedel 
Limuel  Robbins 
Ernest  S.  Roberts 
William  F.  Roewe 
Archie  D.  Rogers 

Continued  on  page  311 


:  281 1 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


♦     #     #     JL    #     4-    ^     ^    _    ^     ^.^  ^    .  , 


•  Si^-'^M..,-^-  .j- 


ORDNANCE  DETACHMENT 

Major  Edward  B.  Johns  Captain  Harry  L.  Suydam 

2nd  Lieut.  Guy  W.  Jones  2nd  Lieut.  Bernard  V.  Bradv  2nd  Lieut.  Howard  Deutz 

2nd  Lieut.  Earle  P.  Reebel 


Sergeants 

Cecil  D.  Edwards 
Earle  G.  Alden 
Henry  L.  Gossman 
Key  E.  Chatfield 
Francis  J.  Steindel 
Sol  G.  Shuster 
Clifford  D.  Carson 
Frank  N.  Brett 
Howard  E.  P.  Clifford 
Karl  N.  Pellard 
Fred  Doht 

Sergeants — First  Class 
\ntone  E.  Kucera 


Joseph  J.  Kucera 
James  E.  Fisher 
Claude  F.  FuUick 
Louis  Tengg 

Sergeants 
William  L.  DuPre 
Augustine  B.  Woods 
Anson  W.  .\llen 
Charles  H.  Korge 
Bernard  R.  O'Connor 

Corporals 
Robert  J.  Gicking 
Mar\nn  A.  Rose 
Harvey  M.  Jones 


-\lbert  L.  Jones 
Henry  P.  Kucera 
William  G.  Barrett 
John  H.  McGeehin 
Arthur  J.  Munz 
Privates — First  Class 
Lewis  E.  Gibbs 
Donald  J.  Penfield 
Andrew  J.  Robertson 
Raj-mond  C.  Engle 
Max  Ziskend 

Privates 
Satumio  Adame 
William  A.  Alford 
Francisco  Apecaca 


Herman  Blake 
Castala  Castillo 
Arthur  L.  Cavender 
Tom  E.  Clark 
Michael  E.  Cooke.  Jr. 
Pascual  Garcia 
.\ugust  Heise 
Gorgonio  Herrera 
Otis  W.  Hood 
Jake  Kaufman 
Edmund  Kwapinski 
Reuben  E.  Leonard 
Grover  C.  Lr«-is 
Omer  F.  Mamer 
Jacobo  Martinez 


Fred  .\.  Meyer 

Jose  Paradez 

Ed  Peter 

Franklin  F.  Robertson 

Tom  Ross 

Lorenzo  P.  Sambriano 

Joseph  Sears 

Burl  F.  Smith 

Joe  R.  Smithheart 

Oscar  P.  Stroupe 

Rufus  Tarter 

Celestino  Vigil 

William  Wurr 


282 


CAMP    TRAVIS    AND    THE     WORLD    WAR 


ORDNANCE  ARMAMENT  COMPANY 

Captain  Robert  N.  Wagener  1st  Lieut.  George  Hilsinger 

First  Sergeant  Lewis  T.  Price        Sergt.  Chief  Clerk  Berl  O.  Breeden  Sergt.  Charge  of  Shop  William  H.  Bost 


Sergeants 
James  E.  Driver 
Sam.  Anderson 
Robert  W.  Skimmerhorn 
Charles  W.  Stowell 
Boiling  J.  Wilson 
Virgil  T.  Goodwin 
John  R.  Dillon 

Sergeants — First  Class 
Grover  E.  Linville 
Dorian  E.  Clark 


Walter  F.  Meagher 

Sergeants 

Willie  C.  Gruetzmacher 
Harry  GiUeland 
Lester  B.  Cornett 
James  E.  Murray 
Leo  M.  Girard 
Frank  L.  Busby 
Nicholas  T.  Lyddane 
Clinton  R.  Walters 


Corporals 

Junius  M.  Furrh 
Clarence  W.  lies 
John  T.  Young 
Rube  D.  Cofifey 
Vernon  L.  Rodgers 
Port  V.  Brown 

Cooks 

Noah  L.  Peters 
Willis  H.  Metcalf 


Privates — First  Class 
DeWitt  T.  Gilliam 
Alfred  E.  Lacy 
Benjamin  F.  Moore 
Harry  M.  Rub 

Privates 
Richard  C.  Adams 
Robert  G.  Blackwell 
William  Clark 
Charlie  T.  Cowgill 
Fenner  Cunningham 


William  O.  Dejamette 
Charles  H.  Gafford 
Ellis  T.  Gravette 
Charles  B.  Hummel 
Ben  H.  Hunnicutt 
Albert  S.  J.  Ivy 
Charles  N.  Lang 
Thomas  C.  Ramsey 
Everett  M.  Shockey 
Thomas  J.  Walsh 
Sam.  Warren 
Clarence  D.  Miller 


283 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


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MEDICAL  DEPARTMENT  DETACHMENT— BASE  HOSPITAL 


Personnel  Sergeant 
1st  Class  Sergeant  Frederick  E.  Pratt 

Supply  Sergeant 
1st  Class  Sergeant  Lyle  A.  Wurmser 


Sergeant  Major 
1st  Class  Sergeant  Bonner  C.  Bolton 

Mess  Sergeant 
Sergeant  Jonas  M.  Frost 


Sergeants — First  Class 
William  Eads 
Frank  A.  Smith 
John  B.  Bolton 
Si  J.  HarreU 
Thomas  W.  Keller 
Charles  S.  Moore 
Harry  K.  Brill 
Silas  Langley 
Amos  C.  Johansen 
Charles  B.  McMahon 

Sergeants 
Frank  B.  Good 
Newby  L.  Cames 
Reginald  W.  Macdonald 
Otto  F.  Wurra 
Percy  T.  Findley 
Frank  McMurrey 
Marvin  H.  McMurrey 
Andrew  T.  Ncibergall 
Robert  Peterson 
Thomas  L.  Ballard 
Asa  C.  Keith 
Mathew  A.  Ketchum 
Walter  S.  Mellor 
Rhene  O.  Muenster 
Alvin  R.  Mulligan 
Earl  Reiser 
George  E.  Smith 
Walter  G.  Sykes 
Oliver  L.  Weakley 
Ralph  A.  Adams 
Edward  R.  Albert 
Wayne  AUbritton 
William  E.  Fisher 
Jacob  F.  Ham 
Edward  F.  Hartronft 
Francis  M.  Morris 
Wilbur  I.  Mudd 
Maurice  R.  Nelson 
WilUam  E.  Panye 
Ivan  D.  Pinyan 
Guenther  H.'  Rother 
Archibald  H.  Rutherford 
Will  R.  Smith 
Higgins  M.  WiUiams 

Corporals 
Reginald  L.  Alexander 
Carl  Johnson 
Roland  M.  Willis 
Samuel  M.  Bogard 
Harry  Dine 
Thomas  E.  Escoe 
Warren  C.  Wheeler 
Lloyd  Williamson 
John  A.  Butler 
Millington  F.  Carpenter 
James  M.  Foley 
Augustus  M.  Gribble 
Fred  A.  Popkess 


Jack  W.  Roach 
Jabin  Vaught 
William  H.  Westphal 

Cooks 
Arthur  D.  Bigbee 
Gus  Cams 
Charles  Curtis 
Paul  G.  Dix 
Frank  O.  Emmons 
Golan  Furrow 
Thomas  E.  Harbour 
Lester  H.  Hall 
Emil  F.  Hiriart 
Roy  E.  Howley 
Charles  B.  McClary 
James  P.  Miller 
Navalie  G.  Nadeau 
Walter  P.  Nahring 
George  G.  Negrey 
Archie  PhiUp,  Jr. 
Anton  Rodgberg 
Lester  Sanders 
Domenico  Sciascio 
Alonzo  H.  Shaw 
Mike  B.  Supina 
OUie  A.  Tunnell 
Milton  Watkins 
William  A.  Weis 
Oscar  C.  Webb 
Harry  B.  Wilson 

Privates — First  Class 
Tobe  Adams 
William  C.  Adams 
Charlie  C.  Akins 
Frederick  W.  Albrecht 
Shelly  L.  Alley 
.\lfred  E.  Anderson 
Joseph  L.  Anthony 
Alex  R.  Antwine 
Frank  E.  Bailey 
James  T.  Bailey 
Perdie  W.  Baker 
WilUam  S.  Baker 
Finis  Baty 
Joseph  J.  Behrnes 
Frank  A.  Bell 
Egil  Benzon 
Marshall  M.  Blackwell 
William  F.  Bidwell 
Douglas  S.  Boone 
Ernest  Bournias 
Glen  W.  Brace 
Finis  E.  Bradshaw 
Charley  W.  Brandon 
Edwin  H.  Brooks 
Samuel  D.  Brown,  Jr. 
Wilhara  A.  Brown 
Jefferson  H.  Browning 
Sidney  D.  Bunch 
Arthur  Burns 


John  L.  Caldwell 
Leo  P.  Campbell 
Roger  L.  Carson 
Christian  Christensen 
Paul  M.  Chiistley 
Loman  H.  Cleveland 
John  T.  Cole 
George  O.  Cone 
William  Cook 
Cecil  L.  Copeland 
Reece  Coppinger 
Orville  H.  Crocker 
Roscoe  V.  Cross 
Hartzell  R.  Crow 
Rufus  Croxdale 
Joe  L.  Crudup 
John  Crum 
Allen  Crupp 
Edgar  A.  Cullum 
Clyde  L.  Curtis 
Andrew  Darden 
Oscar  F.  Dothe 
Solomon  J.  Davidson 
Cecil  Davis 
Erroll  B.  Davis 
Seldon  Day 
James  J.  O.  Dean 
Walter  L.  Deer 
Moses  O.  Defries 
Ken  DeGraffenried 
AUie  DeMoss 
Richard  H.  Dixon 
Floyd  T.  Dodd 
Frederick  Dorn 
John  F.  Duke 
Harvey  J.  Durham 
Tolbert  Durham 
Oscar  E.  Earnheart 
Dennis  E.  Eaton 
Thomas  A.  Eaves 
Joseph  P.  Edwards 
Er\nn  R.  Ellis 
Joe  E.  Ellis 
William  A.  Elsea 
Harry  B.  England 
William  J.  Farmer 
George  L.  Faulk 
Fred  C.  K.  Fehr 
Brown  B.  Ferrill 
Waldon  W.  Fickle 
Leo  E.  Fitzgerald 
Curtis  L.  Foreman 
August  T.  Frye 
John  E.  Galloway 
Thomas  L.  Gammill 
Thomas  E.  Garner 
Charles  P.  Garret 
Robert  W.  Garrett 
Valentine  Gavito,  Jr. 
Lewis  H.  Gerould 
Ernest  O.  Gibson 
Caesar  C.  Gilbert 


William  J.  Gilbert 
Clyde  M.  Glasgow 
Joseph  T.  Glass 
Robert  E.  L.  Glenn 
Texas  H.  Glenn 
Willie  T.  Gossett 
Key  Graveley 
.\very  E.  Graves 
Willie  M.  Gray 
Samuel  D.  Griffing 
William  H.  Halpain 
Bohuslav  J.  Hanacik 
Anton  J.  Hardt 
William  S.  Harkins 
John  B.  Harris 
John  T.  Harvey 
James  A.  Hayden 
Chester  L.  Hays 
Johnnie  T.  Head 
John  J.  Hegerman 
Emil  J.  Helfrich 
John  T.  Henderson 
James  S.  Hendon 
John  D.  Henry 
Ezra  H.  Harrington 
Clarence  J.  Hervy 
George  L.  Hickman 
Lee  R.  Hiler 
.\lvah  E.  Holcomb 
Damon  M.  Holdrege 
Fletcher  P.  Hoskins 
Elba  W.  Hudson 
William  K.  Hughes 
James  E.  Hinkapillar 
Joseph  I.  Hunt 
John  W.  Jackson 
Dod  G.  James 
Andrew  W.  Jetton 
James  E.  Johnson 
Claud  Jones 
Willie  I.  Jones 
Roy  J.  Ketchel 
William  H.  King 
Granvil  L.  K.  Kirk 
Burnie  Koster 
William  Krause 
Samuel  O.  Kuntz 
Edward  R.  Langehennig 
Lee  W.  Latham 
Joe  A.  Latta 
Clarence  Laugherty 
Wyatt  Layne 
William  H.  Lewis 
Parula  R.  Lincecum 
.\aron  P.  Little 
Roger  S.  Littrell 
Cavin  B.  Livingston 
Thomas  Lockhart 
Joseph  K.  Loucks 
James  H.  Lyday 
Lester  C.  Lyons 
James  A.  Lj'ttle 


Charles  Maple 
Harry  J.  Mason 
Charles  E.  Martin 
Thomas  B.  Mayfield 
Harry  K.  McCann 
Manuel  McClain 
William  H.  McCurry 
Nathaniel  McLean 
Cari  B.  McLeod 
E.  J.  McMahon 
Jesse  L.  McNeill 
Willie  J.  McQuillen 
WilUam  Melber 
Charles  C.  Meacham 
Clinton  W.  Merriss 
Fred.  Meyers 
Herbert  S.  Michelbrook 
Dudley  C.  Miller 
Matthews  Milner,  Jr. 
Hubert  Mixon 
Ralph  Mixon 
Herbert  H.  :Moberly 
WilUam  F.  Money 
Monte  E.  Montgomery 
Johnnie  W.  Moody 
Martin  .\.  Moritz 
William  H.  Mulvoy 
Walter  W.  Murray 
Clarence  C.  Nance 
Harlen  Napier 
Clayton  H.  Nelson 
Albert  R.  Nix 
George  W.  O'Daniel 
Carl  G.  Ohman 
Dillard  Ott 
Charles  Panebouef 
Elbert  C.  Parker 
Loran  A.  PhiUips 
Eugene  A.  Pfeffer 
Robert  B.  Pittman 
WiUiam  F.  PoUard 
Robert  W.  Popham 
Peter  A.  Preddy 
Earl  P.  Price 
David  A.  Pusley 
Oscar  L.  Raney 
WiUis  P.  Reed 
Ellis  P.  Reed 
Joe  E.  Reed 
MarshaU  C.  Reed 
Harry  S.  Reeves 
Glenn  Remington 
Robert  W.  Renter 
Thomas  E.  Rhodes 
Ola  C.  Ritch 
Herbert  C.  Rockett 
Otto  Rose 
Robert  L.  Ross 
Mile  F.  Ruane 
Melvin  G.  Russell 
CharUe  J.  Sadau 
Charles  R.  Schanaubert 


284 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


.k 


Herbert  J.  Schattenbeerg 
John  Schoedel 
Martin  E.  Schoedel 
Earl  E.  Schmutz 
James  M.  Scott 
Florence  T.  Shannahan 
Theo.  W.  Shaw 
Alfred  E.  Shepperd 
Robert  W.  Shirley 
Paul  Skidmore 
Alvah  E.  Smith 
Hugh  R.  Smith 
William  J.  Smith 
William  J.  Sootka 
Hiram  W.  Spraggins 
Tom  H.  Stephens 
Clyde  E.  Stogner 
Augustus  C.  Stuart 
Fred  W.  Stuart 
Fred  F.  Stuckey 
Alfred  T.  Sumrall 
Allie  J.  Sweeney 
Merrion  A.  Tabor 
Robert  L.  Tatman 
Charles  H.  Terrell 
Rodney  Thomas 
Noble  R.  Thompson 
Robert  A.  Thompson 
Bedford  D.  Thrasher 
Harry  Tony 
John  H.  Turner 
William  S.  Turner 
Charles  Vansteenberg 
Charles  L.  Vaughan 
Albert  E.  Vaughn 
Roberto  Vela 
Ramon  N.  Villareal 
William  S.  Vines 
Wiley  Q.  Voyles 
Walter  S.  Walker 
Patrick  J.  Walsh 
Gilbert  C  Ward 
Robert  B.  Ward 
Joseph  E.  Ware 
Darwin  Watts 
Irving  P.  Welch 
Reuben  Q.  Welcth 
Francis  A.  Westmoreland 
Otis  S.  Whittington 
William  D.  Wibbom 
John  D.  Willis 
Fred.  Winkle 
Charles  P.  Wucher 
Edward  Young 
Floyd  G.  Zimmerman 

Privates 
John  J.  Adamowicz 
Horace  V.  Adams 
Ross  G.  Adams 
Russell  P.  Adams 
Raymond  C.  Albert 
Frank  P.  Allen 
Altus.  Almand 
Alfred  Anderson 
Emmett  A.  Anderson 
Simon  C.  Anderson 
Thomas  E.  Armstrong 


MEDICAL  DEPARTMENT  DETACHMENT— BASE  HOSPITAL 


.      1 

JSI1|K 

4 

>  - 
'A. 

Albert  W.  Armstrong 
George  L.  Ashley 
William  M.  Ashley 
Homer  C.  Avery 
James  C.  Baker 
Harold  R.  Baldwin 
William  H.  Bagby 
Earl  E.  Bare 
Will  Bargo 
Harvey  C.  Baskin 
Alvin  S.  Bates 
William  H.  Beasley 
Fay  R.  Bearden 
Charles  A.  Bellinghausen 
Joe  W.  Belote 
William  F.  Bennett 
WiUiam  M.  Bickell 
James  B.  Birdwell 
Herman  M.  Blagg 
Silas  R.  Bohannon 
Lee  Roy  Bolten 
Tommie  E.  Boucher 
Oscar  P.  Bourge 
Earl  A.  Bowman 
Guilford  F.  Branson 
Alexander  Brehm 
Jerry  T.  Brewer 
Roy  E.  Brockett 
Horace  I.  Brooks 
Chester  J.  Brown 
Jesse  E.  Brown 
Lafa  Brown 
Winston  J.  Brown 
Arlie  E.  Brundege 
George  Bryant 
Clifton  Burks 
Curtis  Burks 
Andrew  T.  Burns 
Fonsie  F.  Burnside 
William  M.  Burton 
Ernest  R.  Bushman 
Rufus  A.  Caldwell 
John  L.  Carter 
Jack  Casey 
John  M.  Cathey 
Charles  Chernocky 
James  H.  Cipher 
John  C.  Clark 
John  K.  Clay 
Chevis  R.  Cleveland 
James  Coffman 
Grady  Cole 
Benjamin  F.  Coleman 
Nowlan  Collier 
Owen  T.  Combs 
Elbert  Cook 
Thomas  F.  Covey 
Burrell  D.  Crabtree 
Walter  C.  Crawley 
Acie  B.  Crosthwaite 
Benito  Cruz    . 
Lawrence  W.  CuUins 
Claud  H.  Currier 
Eugene  L.  Curry 
Orman  Curry 
James  R.  Curtis 
John  H.  Curtis 
Lee  R.  Dalton 


Delma  J.  Daniel 
Culbert  H.  Davenport 
Allie  Davenport 
Bev.  D.  Davis 
Charles  A.  Davis 
Elmer  Davis 
Lester  F.  Davis 
William  T.  Davis 
Leonard  F.  Dauwalter 
Lisbon  C.  Dean 
Alexander  W.  DeFever 
Norris  L.  Delavan 
Grover  L.  Dixon 
Jesse  F.  Dial 
Thomas  J.  Doss 
Bert  Douglas 
L.  Erwin  Downing 
Willie  E.  Doyle 
Benjamin  H.  Duff 
Joshua  H.  Dunn 
Weyman  W.  Dyson 
James  E.  Eaves 
Dick  Ellette 
Joseph  A.  Ellington 
Ray  Emert 
James  R.  Eoff 
Albin  Farrell 
John  B.  Fenn 
James  A.  Ferguson 
Purves  E.  Finley 
Everett  W.  Firestone 
Abner  E.  Fitts 
Dave  S.  Floyd 
Maxwell  P.  Floyd 
Ed  Flynne 
Albert  Foerster 
Edison  D.  Fowler 
Albert  J.  Fox 
John  D.  Fultz 
Luther  R.  Gaddis 
Ezra  Galloway 
J.  D.  Galloway 
Emil  M.  Gander 
Henr>'  L.  Garrison 
Henry  O.  Gay 
Howard  G.  Gibbs 
Roy  E.  Gillwheater 
John  A.  Gilmore 
Fredie  Giroir 
Thomas  B.  Gist 
Louis  A.  Gleyre 
Barney  Goldstein 
Noah  B.  Goodwin 
Oscar  L.  Goodwin 
William  B.  Graham 
Solomon  Giantham 
John  C.  Gray 
Edgar  O.  Gray 
Fred  W.  Gray 
Robert  H.  Greenberg 
William  E.  Griffin 
William  E.  Grisham 
Arthur  L.  Gwin 
William  H.  Habermacher 
Jesse  R.  Foster 
William  C.  Haddock 
Harold  O.  Hagans 
Harry  B.  Hale 


Iley  M.  Hall 
Mora  D.  Hall 
Clyde  L.  Harber 
Ernest  O.  Hammon 
Paul  L.  Hardee 
Willie  R.  Harding 
Carl  T.  Hargis 
Floyd  A.  Harmon 
Hosea  Harris 
Harmon  Harrison 
E.  E.  Head 
Alfred  D.  Haydel 
Andry  R.  Henderson 
Homer  Herin 
Peter  D.  Hiebert 
Hubert  W.  Highnote 
Cecil  C.  Hill 
Jeffa  P.  Hill 
Mack  Hillman 
Sam  H.  Hinkle 
Charles  L.  Hodge 
Matthew  Holberg 
William  C.  Holder 
Ernest  Holje 
Clyde  O.  Hopwood 
Eddie  O.  Hunt 
John  E. loor 
Grover Ivy 
Douglas  B.  Jarvis 
Benjamin  F.  Jernigan 
Arthur  O.  Johnson 
Harry  Johnson 
Joe  Johnson 
Landreth  Johnson 
William  M.  Johnson 
Joseph  W.  Jones 
Marvin  C.  Jones 
Lee  J.  Jordan 
John  Kanak 
Henry  I.  Kerby 
Henry  Keys 
Floyd  P.  Kidd 
Willie  F.  King 
Homer  L.  Krueger 
Rhea  Kuykendall 
Robert  Laidlow 
Harry  W.  Lancaster 
Elijah  Landrum 
William  H.  Lansford 
Carl  Lawrence 
Flay  F.  Lawrence 
Allen  D.  Lawson 
William  Lefferts 
Roy  C.  Leicht 
Clair  Leslie 
Bonnie  M.  Lewis 
Joseph  H.  Lloyd 
Francis  A.  London 
Andrew  C.  Longcrier 
James  F.  Lowe 
Henry  H.  Luck 
George  E.  Lynn 
Russell  E.  Mackay 
Paul  Maleski 
Leslie  E.  Mallow 
Harry  E.  Maltbie 
Milton  Marks 
Willie  E.  Maresh 


Morgan  A.  Martin 
Patrick  0.  Martin 
Manuel  Martinez 
Charlie  Marvel 
Leroy  T.  Mattingly 
Matt  A.  McCall 
Jack  McCarty 
Noah  McCauley 
James  M  McClellan 
Clarence  N.  McClure 
Olen  McCormack 
James  D.  McDonald 
Audie  L.  McElroy 
Delt  McKinney 
Volney  R.  McManus 
Edward  L.  McMillan 
George  A.  McMillan 
John  A.  McVeigh 
Vernon  L.  McWilliams 
Murff  G.  Merritt 
Newell  C.  Miller 
Harless  W.  Melton 
Charlie  Mills 
John  E.  Minge 
Numa  Mitchell 
Thomas  D.  Moore 
Willie  E.  Moore 
Earl  R.  Morris 
Dyer  E.  Morrison 
Gus  J.  Mueller 
Harry  G.  Murphy 
Grover  C.  Murray 
Volney  J.  Nale 
Luther  A.  Nelson 
William  O'Hara 
Gilbert  B.  Osborn 
Dewey  R.  Ousnamer 
Paul  E.  Owen 
Claude  L.  Owens 
Perry  K.  Page 
Clyde  F.  Parks 
Ulrick  Palmer 
Jesse  M.  Parker 
Johnnie  Pavloivch 
Grover  C.  Pelton 
Elijah  N.  PhiUips 
Archie  T.  Potter 
Larkin  Raley 
Silas  L.  Pruden 
Luis  Quiroz 
Fount  Rasbeary 
David  M.  Rasure 
Franklin  H.  Rau 
Patrick  A.  Reagan 
John  H.  Reed 
Aron  W.  Regier 
Joseph  D.  Resnick 
Charles  Reville 
William  J.  Richey 
Joe  Richker 
Thell  F.  Richmond 
Emanuel  W.  Rogers 
Earl  Roberts 
Jack  Rogers 
James  W.  Rogers 
John  W.  Romine 
James  E.  Rone 

Continued  on  page  317 


[285] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


NURSES— BASE  HOSPITAL 


Bertha  Kagel 
Sarah  Williams 
Francis  Wilson 
Ruth  Woodworth 
Gertrude  Vail 
Francis  Venton 
Lillian  Vegus 
Grace  Jenkins 
Ada  Wellock 
Bertha  Christianson 
May  Griffith 
Marie  Giroux 
Martha  Silley 
Annie  E.  McCoy 
Catherine  Nugent 
Martha  A.  Morrison 
Irene  Han- 
Grace  Lyons 
Hilda  Erickson 
Sadie  M.  Rosenthawl 
Alice  McLaughlin 
Mary  I.  Patrick 
May  Shoemaker 
Adeline  Kunz 
BiUy  M.  Clark 
Lulu  Nicholason 
Collette  Cady 
Mamie  E.  Stephenson 


Pearl  W.  Edwards 
Hanna  Larson 
Lida  McClellan 
Regina  Essie 
Bemice  C.  Falls 
Elizabeth  Knipp 
Kate  Dodson 
Mary  C.  Oleson 
Marj'  Broson 
Mar\-  Hayer 
Blanch  Caley 
Julia  Carmeron 
Nell  Julian 
Hariette  Forby 
Annie  Yerry 
Mar>'  Monday 
Ethel  LaBadie 
Martha  Everett 
Katherine  A.  McCabe 
Stella  A.  Madden 
Sarah  A.  Flannigan 
Annie  Mullhall 
Anita  Campbell 
Lucie  Mount 
Susie  C.  Pannell 
Cora  A.  Conner 
Willie  McCary 
Lilly  Jacob-Meyer 


Mary  Christian 
Annie  McPhail 
Caroline  A.  Stupka 
Laurel  V.  Craig 
Bertha  S.  Haley 
Edith  Webb 
Alice  M.  Fuhrman 
Emiline  Ranis 
Annie  M.  Metz 
Emma  Frank 
Lidia  Brunnels 
JuUa  Johnson 
Anna  Schumaker 
Marguerete  Shannon 
Hazel  WiUiams 
Helena  Morrison 
Bessie  Michel 
Elizabeth  Cox 
Lafry  Maelstead 
Ester  Peterson 
Minnie  Johnson 
Ester  Erickson 
Cathr\'n  Shultz 
Ester  Nash 
Bemetta  Dellon 
Beatrice  A.  Wick 
Grace  Cady 
Edith  Roberson 


Edna  M.  Lovell 

Nellie  Severson 
Silvia  Riley 
Charlotte  Kunz 
Sarah  Orr 
Gene  Mcintosh 
Julia  J.  Bradish 
Bennie  Benson 
Edna  Serrells 
Dora  L.  Dresser 
Clara  Mitchel 
Mary  Kranter 
Sarah  Campbell    • 
Maude  S.  Mathers 
Elizabeth  Smith 
Anna  K.  Towes 
Lillian  Heline 
Alice  Hederstedt 
Susan  Crumpacker 
Flora  Vise 
Maggie  Bruce 
Olive  Wilson 
Lillian  C.  Anderson 
LiUie  K.  Sack\'ille 
Mable  Sen 
Ruby  Kramer 
Clara  Picks 
Continued  on  page  311 


L      •^■^>^ 


286 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


Capt.  John  G.  McCall,  M.  C. 
1st  Lieut.  Andrew  J.  Aird,  M.  C. 


CAMP  INFIRMARY  No.  9 

1st  Lieut.  Gebhard  J.  Long,  Jr.,  M.  C. 
1st  Lieut.  Carl  T.  Dufner,  M.  C. 


1st  Lieut.  Perry  A.  Baze,  M.  C. 
1st  Lieut.  Earl  W.  Cla water.  M.  C. 


Sergeants 
Henry  W.  BeU 
Joseph  C.  Borden 
Lota  L.  Prock 
Corporal 
Frank  L.  Seifert 
Private — First  Class 
Tom  J.  McMillian 


Privates 
Stephen  Atchison 
Clinton  O.  Atwood 
Thomas  Bums 
Oscar  \.  Ennis 
.\aron  C.  Garrett 
Edward  E.  Jones 
Frank  C.  Hanson 
Joseph  W.  Spradley 


287 


CAMP    TRAVIS    AND    THE    WORLD     WAR 


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[288] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


I 


OFFICERS— PROVOST  GUARD 

Left  to  right 

2nd  Lieut.  W.  F.  Foley  2nd  Lieut.  J.  L.  Boyd  1st  Lieut.  C.  R.  Smith  Captain  Don  M.  Gleason 

1st  Lieut.  E.  L.  Zudeck  2nd  Lieut.  A.  L.  Dumajne  2nd  Lieut.  H.  W.  Stevenson 


THEY  PRESERVED  ORDER  IN  CAMP 

Provost  Guard  Also  Dealt  IVith  Huns  and  Slackers 


THE  PROVOST  GUARD  COMPANY,  commanded 
by  Capt.  Don  M.  Gleason,  and  consisting  of  picked 
men  from  various  walks  of  life,  maintained  order 
within  the  reservation  and  carried  out  the  camp  regula- 
tions. The  greater  portion  of  the  men  were  in  a  mounted 
detachment,  which  patrolled  the  entire  camp  and  out- 
skirts. Some  of  the  best  riders,  with  years  of  experience 
on  western  ranches,  were  among  the  personnel  of  the  or- 
ganization, and  sheriffs,  deputy  sheriffs  and  policemen  from 
various  parts  of  the  country  were  to  be  found  on  the  roster. 
One  of  the  interesting  features  of  Camp  Travis  was  the 
stockade  under  the  direction  of  Lieutenant  Clarence  R. 
Smith,  prison  officer.  Here  prisoners  were  held  for  trial, 
sentenced  to  short  terms  and  sentenced  to  various  terms  of 


confinement  at  Fort  Leavenworth,  Kansas.  Hundreds  of 
men  were  confined  there  during  the  war.  Many  were 
men  of  national  repute.  Among  the  more  renowned  were: 
Maurice  Becker,  cartoonist  of  New  York  City,  and  Maxi- 
milian Von  Hagen,  lawyer,  New  Haven,  Conn.,  who  wrote 
"Deutschland  uber  alles"  and  other  pro-German  senti- 
ments on  his  questionnaire.  He  was  also  one  of  the 
counsels  in  the  Von  Papen  Case. 

The  stockade  was  an  enclosure  240  feet  by  125  feet, 
consisting  of  three  barbed  wire  fences.  Within  the  en- 
closure there  were  two  guard  houses.  Sentinels,  armed 
with  repeating  shotguns,  were  stationed  in  look-out  towers 
at  each  corner  of  the  enclosure.  Sentinels  for  this  work 
were  furnished  by  the  Provost  Guard  Company. 


[289] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


1st  Lieut.  Clarence  R.  Smith 
1st  Lieut.  Edwin  L.  Zudeck 
2nd  Lieut.  James  L.  Boyd 


Sergeants 
James  P.  Wilmoth 
James  H.  Powers 
Guy  E.  Winn 
James  p.  Randolph 
James  W.  Cawthon 
Robert  W.  Henderson 
Clarence  Lewellen 
William  W.  Brock 
Arthur  C.  Sublett 
Claud  F.  Williamson 
William  H.  Thomas 
John  A.  Taylor 
Cole  V.  Holcomb 
Millard  Roberts 

Provost  Sergeant 
Malcolm  Hederson 

Asst.  Provost  Sergeant 
CK-erton  L.  Willis 

Corporals 
Milford  L.  Torbett 
Benjamin  H.  Smith 
Cormie  Watts 
Clarence  D.  Camel 
Martin  Potucek 
Martin  D.  Ivey 


Thomas  W.  Usrey 
Hugo  F.  Barsch 
Chester  T.  Beights 
Mike  L.  Bell 
Wesley  N.  Gray 
Jacob  Michelson 
John  A.  Renner 
Clin  W.  Simmons 
Hubert  J.  Starr 
Charles  E.  High 
Fred  H.  Strelow 
Joseph  Schwalm 
Alvin  J.  Bvram 
Hillary  Q.'L vies 
Rufus  C.  Went 
Roscoe  W.  Beene 
Ebbie  L.  Boland 
William  A.  Dowdy 
Fred.  Johnson 
Henry  C.  Wvlie 
John  W.  Abies 
Charley  B.  Grubb 
Howard  P.  Veight 

Mechanics 
Clyde  S.  Dunn 
Anton  Schodl 
Joseph  P.  White 
William  E.  Coats 


PROVOST  GUARD  COMPANY 

Captain  Don  M.  Gleason 
2nd  Lieut.  Albert  L.  Dumaine 
2nd  Lieut.  William  F.  Foley 
2nd  Lieut.  Harvey  W.  Stevenson 

Buglers 
Kenneth  E.  Erickson 
Homei  M.  Perkins 

Privates — First  Class 
Edward  J.  Bigheart 
Conrad  C.  CUck 
Bertis  L.  Cox 
Robert  V.  Endicott 
Alva  A.  Harmon 
Herbert  W.  Hunt 
Lewis  F.  Johnson 
Oscar  T.  Lee 
John  T.  Martin 
Lewis  G.  Perkins 
Orvall  T.  Prather 
Charles  T.  Shaw 
Gail  Sisson 
Ernest  Sproles 
Clarence  E.  Thomas 
Albert  Tre\-ino 
Millard  M.  Wadsworth 
Jimmie  Walker 
Albert  C.  Woods 

Privates 
Clarence  W.  Adams 
Walter  R.  Adams 
Horace  Albert 


First  Sergeant  Vernon  G.  Cahill 
Supply  Sergeant  Jesse  Wilkenfeld 
Stable  Sergeant  Asa  P.  James 


Eli  Aldridge 
Samuel  A.  Allison 
John  R.  Anderson 
Grady  Ashley 
Hugh  A.  Atchley 
Oran  C.  Baker 
Paul  L.  R.  Baker 
Claience  C.  Ballard 
Manuel  Balliett 
Ernest  W.  Bales 
Howard  W.  Barnes 
George  Bates 
Harvey  R.  Baxter 
Franklin  T.  Beavers 
Robert  W.  Birmingham 
Jesse  E.  Bolton 
Perry  N.  Bone 
Arthur  S.  Boyd 
Alvin  Brazell 
William  M.  Brewer 
Cecil  P.  Brown 
EHsha  F.  Brown 
Hardie  H.  Brown 
Earl  G.  Buchanan 
Robert  D.  Burge 
Charles  D.  Campbell 
Elijah  H.  Cain 
James  H.  Cannada 
Robert  D.  Cantwell 


Raymond  Can- 
Robert  H.  Carter 
WajTie  A.  Cassatt 
Warren  G.  Colvin 
Claud  Lee  Comer 
OUver  W.  Conn 
John  S.  Cook 
Leonard  A.  Cook 
Albert  B.  Cooper 
James  H.  Cox 
Lawrence  Criwell 
Walter  C.  Crites 
Floyd  Cummings 
Charlie  Dabtrom 
Lewis  P.  Dalton 
Charlie  P.  Dandridge 
Oral  F.  Daniels 
Sam  D.  Davis 
Benjamin  F.  Denson 
Eugene  A.  Dickson 
Fritz  R.  DoUinger 
Lemma  Day 
Robert  E.  Douglas 
.Mbert  Domhoefer 
Oliver  B.  Duggins 
John  E.  Edmiston 
Ben  Q.  Ester 
Earl  L.  Fleharty 
Bruno  Fahning 


[290] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


PROVOST  GUARD  COMPANY 


Ernest  A.  Farrack 
Otto  Federwisch 
Albert  Feller 
Jesse  L.  Fountain 
Charlie  P.  Fulkerson 
Thomas  J.  Fuller 
James  C.  Fester 
Ernest  Gaebler 
Sidney  C.  Gattis 
Jason  R.  Gender 
Claude  Gilbert 
John  Henry  Glover 
Herbert  B.  Godsey 
Samuel  E.  Golden 
Hilario  Gomez 
John  Graeff 
Murray  H.  Graham 
Willie  J.  Granger 
Claude  Grey 
Arbra  E.  Green 
George  J.  Greener 
Mason  E.  Gwinn 
William  Hairgrove 
Audry  L.  Hale 
Isaac  C.  HaU 
Jack  Hall 
Alva  Hamesley 
William  F.  Hanson 
Andrew  C.  Hassell 
Charlie  L.  Haught 
Adolph  Havran 
Paul  Haupp 
Ruby  L.  Hazelton 
Daniel  J.  Heffley 


Edward  B.  Heldin 
Tilden  B.  Helmuth 
Walter  A.  Hempel 
Roy  E.  Higgason 
Raymond  P.  Henton 
Edward  E.  Helub 
Russell  Horton 
Ora  C.  Houlton 
William  W.  House 
Rudolph  A.  Hartraan 
Paul  W.  Hilbrich 
James  R.  Howard 
James  W.  Hudman 
William  B.  Jackson 
Harry  B.  James 
Earl  Jenson 
John  W.  Johnson 
Paul  N.  Johnson 
Russell  M.  Johnson 
Wilbur  H.  Johnson 
William  J.  Johnston 
Robert  L.  Jones 
John  Jurcak 
Charles  Q.  Kargcr 
George  M.  Keeling 
Frank  Kelly 
John  P.  Kelly 
James  F.  Kelly 
Caleb  W.  Kempf 
Fred  L.  Kempf 
Roger  L.  Kesterson 
William  A.  Kiker 
John  A.  King 
Clarence  L.  Kinyon 


Henry  Kitzman 
Leo  Knof 

Charles  W.  F.  Koch 
•  Edward  Koeninger 
Victor  Kovalcik 
Lawrence  W.  Korber 
George  E.  Lacy 
Oscar  E.  Lee 
Gordon  F.  Lay 
Nocklett  Leiune 
John  B.  Lindsey 
Robert  L.  Logan 
George  Lord 

Christian  F.  Lueckemeyer 
Emil  Lundeen 
Paul  N.  Lutonsky 
Rudolph  E.  Martin 
Clarence  E.  Matthews 
Leonard  M.  McBumey 
William  McDonough 
John  D.  McKay 
William  McMillion 
Floyd  Mitchem 
Luis  Mocka 
Henry  G.  Molzahn 
Samuel  Montgomery 
Virge  Morris 
Oliver  Moser 
Joe  R.  Naegelin 
Jack  Nelson 
Reinarth  Nelson 
Nicholas  Neu 
Leslie  A.  Newman 
Jesse  R.  Nicholson 


Andrew  J.  Nolen 
Robert  L.  Odoms 
Robert  L.  Oliver 
Henry  M.  Parker 
Floyd  E.  Patty 
Jefferson  D.  Patterson 
Norberti  Perez 
Luther  Peveto 
Clifton  W.  Phelps 
Nicholas  R.  Phillips 
James  E.  Pierce 
Warner  H.  Plant 
Frank  L.  Polka 
Oscar  T.  Pollock 
Fey  B.  Ponton 
Hamp  J.  Porter 
Albert  R.  Puryear 
Troy  D.  Ray 
James  C.  Reagan 
Levi  Reed 
Gilford  E.  Reynolds 
Walter  L.  Reynolds 
Daniel  Rugh 
Geronimo  Sanchez 
John  F.  Sanford 
Edward  E.  Sayer 
Willie  Srhulz 
Willie  Schwarting 
Fred  H.  Sherman 
Walter  B.  Sisk 
Verdo  A.  Slaughter 
Festus  W.  Smith 
George  M.  Smith 
Henry  A.  Smith 


Tony  H.  Souris 
Albert  B.  Spears 
John  Steen 
Samuel  P.  Stofle 
Raymond  L.  Strickland 
Harvey  H.  Strong 
William  O.  Stuart 
Karl  X.  Sullivan 
Swen  V.  Swenson 
Jay  D.  Terry 
John  Eli  Terry 
Howard  B.  Thames 
Robert  L.  Thomas 
Levy  W.  Tomlison 
Willie  F.  Turner 
Frank  Volney 
Willie  M.  Wade 
Erwin  G.  Wahl 
Walter  J.  Waldrop 
Isham  Walker 
Henry  B.  Wallace 
Max  Wallace 
William  A.  Walraven 
Edgar  J.  Warren 
James  C.  Weddle 
Arthur  N.  White 
William  M.  White 
Arthur  S.  Whitley 
Junior  L.  Williams 
Ira  L.  Wilson 
WiUis  B.  Wilson 
James  L.  Winter 
Fred  Witt 
Bokker  H.  Wright 


[291] 


CAMP    TRAVIS    AND    THE     WORLD    WAR 


t  T  it* 


Truckmaster 
1st  Class  Sergeant  Clare  H.  Wood 

Assistant  Truckmasters 
First  Section 
Sergeant  Frank  J.  Frosh 

Second  Section 
Sergeant  William  F.  Williams 

Third  Section 
Sergeant  Raymond  H.  Becker 

Company  Clerk 
Sergeant  Raymond  M.  Nellan 

Property  Sergeant 
Sergeant  William  A.  Hanson 

Mess  Sergeant 
Sergeant  Richard  R.  Drabick 

Cook 
John  T.  Mahan 


MOTOR  TRANSPORT  COMPANY  353 
1st  Lieut.  Leslie  C.  Mefrem,  M.  T.  C. 


Dispatchers 
Corp.  A.  Kantrowitz,  Chief 
Private  Richard  C.  Leek,  Asst. 


Mechanics 
Sergeant  J.  B.  Leschinski,  Chief 
Corporal  Samuel  H.  Vignes,  Asst. 
Private  Richard  Best,  .\sst. 
Private  Herman  A.  .\rnold,  .\sst. 
Private  James  L.  Kirby,  Asst. 


Mail  Orderly 
Sergeant  Lester  L.  Stanger 


Sergeants 
John  Bennett 
Edwin  R.  Brown 
John  L.  Grimm 
Michael  J.  Harney 
Henry  J.  Hughes 
Elmer  A.  Huntzicker 
David  E.  Kelley 
Darrel  S.  Schuh 
Orion  N.  Ward 
John  C.  Weekly 


Corporals 
James  A.  Barrett 
Andrew  \.  Costa 
Claude  Cox 
George  Ladenburg 
Harry  C.  Leary 
William  J.  Moran 
Clifford  McLeod 
Leon  Spradlin 

Private — First  Class 
Charles  D.  McColley 

Privates 
George  G.  Abrahamson 
Harvey  W.  Allen 
Albert  N.  .\nderson 
Clifford  E.  Anderson 
James  R.  .Anderson 
Carrol  C.  Barton 
William  R.  Beeman 
James  M.  Brandenburg 
John  A.  Bullock 
Archie  Carraway 
Richard  T.  Collins 
Cecil  E.  Corgey 
Earl  M.  Crump 
Arthur  T.  Cruz 
William  E.  Davidson 


Joe  M.  Davis 
Robert  S.  Davis 
Jack  J.  Depuma 
John  \.  Edwards 
Paul  E.  Fielder 
John  Franko 
John  C.  French 
William  R.  Houck 
Joseph  W.  Jackson 
Frank  Janda 
Albert  J.  Jenson 
Toby  M.  Kelley 
Ernest  R.  Lowe 
James  N.  Marks 
Percy  T.  Meacham 
Emit  R.  Owens 
Mike  Palermo 
Frank  H.  Peltier 
Walter  P.  Pittman 
Mack  W.  Pitts 
Albert  E.  Roles 
Walter  D.  Sinks 
Hubert  A.  Sperry 
Fisher  O.  Stark 
Benno  Strempel 
Walter  S.  Taylor 
Homer  D.  L.  Waid 
William  C.  Webb 
Arbie  E.  WiUingham 


292] 


CAMP    TRAVIS    AND    THE    WORLD    WAR 


MOTOR  TRANSPORT  CORPS  DETACHMENT 


Sergeants 

Albert  DeBaun 
Benjamin  W.  Lattner 
William  W.  Mullen 
John  Pytel 
Stuart  F.  Swain 
Marcus  H.  Trail 

Corporal 
James  A.  Bartlett 

Privates — First  Class 

Leslie  C.  Howard 
Arthur  T.  Mackey 
Murry  M.  Steinkirchner 


Privates 

Charles  W.  Asher 
Samuel  H.  Camp 
David  I.  Cantu 
Leslie  Carter 
Russ  W.  Clements 
John  E.  Clendenen 
Oscar  M.  Anderson 
William  B.  Davis 
Vollo  O.  Davis 
Charlie  Easley 
Richard  C.  Edgeworth 
Sam  J.  Eckstein 
Richard  Erven 
William  T.  French 
Herbert  P.  Gillespie 
Abraham  Ginzberg 
James  A.  Godwin 


Richard  P.  Griffin 
Felix  E.  Hatley 
Elmer  B.  Holland 
Willis  G.  Huddleston 
William  H.  Isenhour 
Elmer  J.  Jaderborg 
Remmie  S.  Jones 
Maxie  A.  Kennon 
Lawrence  L.  Kinghorn 
Earl  R.  Lytle 
Delma  H.  McCarley 
Willis  H.  H.  Miller 
George  W.  Miller 
Oscar  S.  Mo  wry 
Roman  Neri 
Albert  Peebles 
Clarence  E.  Parkhill 
Herman  Raab 


Edward  P.  Reilly 
Marion  W.  Ross 
Floyd  Schuman 
Edward  E.  Schwartz 
Frank  A.  Schmitz 
John  B.  Sellers 
Herbert  S.  Sinclair 
Merton  G.  Shurley 
Jerry  M.  Staggs 
Herbert  C.  H.  Stucke 
Nicholas  Sarchno 
Harvey  T.  Snowden 
Louis  R.  Stuart 
Robert  M.  Tyus 
Louis  J.  Velsir 
Willie  Wagner 
Will  R.  Warren 
Jim  L.  Williams 
Cary  C.  White 


[293] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


HEADQUARTERS  COMPANY,  85th  INFANTRY 
Continued  from  page  90 


Privates 
Fred  Cowgill 
Horace  R.  Cox 
Melvin  Crabb  . 
Roy  Crandall 
Arthur  Darby 
Robert  B.  Dennis 
Jack  J.  DeSalme 
Lawrence  Dewees 
Thomas  J.  Duncan 
Colby  E.  Durden 
Jake  Eastman 
Roy  F.  Fallis 
Fred  Fisher 
Jose  Flores 
Edwin  E.  Fuchs 
Benton  M.  Freeman 
Oscar  Fults 
Jason  D.  Gammill 
William  C.  Garsee 
Charlie  L.  Glanton 
Seth  B.  Gray 
Edward  Green 
Floyd  P.  Green 
Robert  E.  Griffen 
Charlie  L.  Harris 
Edwin  F.  Harrison 
John  E.  Hill 
Albert  L.  Henley 
James  C.  Hickey 
Roy  Hodges 
William  H.  Hodges 


Thomas  W.  Hook 
Homer  S.  Hopkins 
Max  James 
NeiU  H.  Jay 
Herbert  E.  Johnson 
Dennis  R.  Jordan 
Ernest  D.  Jordan 
William  C.  Johnson 
Robert  R.  Kapp 
Roy  O.  Kay 
Carl  H.  Kelley 
Clyde  C.  KeUey 
John  Ketner 
Josie  D.  Kinsey 
Fred  H.  Klenk 
Herman  O.  Korn 
Harper  W.  Kloppenburg 
Berthold  E.  Koenig 
Theodore  J.  LeRoy 
Jim  S.  Lavender 
Bert  Le%vter 
Owen  B.  Lloyd 
George  T.  Lott 
Ygancoi  Mancha 
William  O.  Marshal! 
Stanislaw  Matuskv 
Ike  McCaffity 
James  E.  McGee 
Phillip  McLeroy 
Otho  McMinn 
William  E.  Medcalf 
Ben  Medlin 


John  T.  Mgebroff 
John  T.  Mims 
Clyde  C.  Moore 
Isaac  N.  Moore 
Willie  C.  Motl 
Walter  Nesloney 
Oran  Nicholson 
Phines  S.  Oliver 
Bob  Overand 
Augustin  Padilla 
Willie  J.  Patterson 
Norman  Pederson 
Marvin  Phy 
Hugo  A.  Piske 
Floyd  M.  Rafferty 
Joseph  I.  Rainwater 
Bib  Reeves 
Goth  C.  Reichle 
Charhe  L.  Reynolds 
William  S.  Rich 
Richard  Riley 
Buster  Ring 
Macedonia  Roderiquez 
Cannon  E.  Rowe 
Newt  P.  Rutledge 
James  Scalf 
Fred  P.  Shafferkoeter 
Joe  M.  Shilling 
Edgar  Schmidt 
Willie  L.  Sewell 
Odie  G.  Shenks 
Otto  L.  Shoemaker 


Frank  Sieger 
John  Sinke 
Joe  Sisa 
Cassie  Smith 
William  Smith 
Edwin  L.  Stalmach 
William  Stott,  Jr. 
Robert  Stott 
Fredthoff  Strom 
Jesse  F.  Strong 
Francis  M.  Taylor 
Harman  J.  Taylor 
Hobart  Taylor 
Otto  Tegeler 
James  H.  Teague 
Albert  C.  Templeton 
John  V.  Teutsch 
Hays  Venable 
Ercel  T.  Warren 
John  C.  Wasson 
John  T.  Weeks 
Mac  B.  Welch 
Tim  West 
William  O.  West 
Charlie  M.  Wiggins 
Jesse  J.  Wilkenson 
Fred  L.  Wurzbach 
Daniel  Zarillo 
Oswald  E.  Zieschang 
Sabas  Zuniga 


SUPPLY  COMPANY,  85th  INFANTRY 


Continued  from  page  92 


Wagoners 
John  H.  King 
Manley  T.  Kirby 
Robert  F.  Kizziar 
Willie  Lampe 
Walter  J.  Leschper 
Walter  G.  Locklier 
Samuel  A.  Lawton 
William  H.  Lusk 
John  F.  Manning 
Henr>'  E.  Medford 
Robert  Marek 
William  B.  Massey 
Jewell  K.  McMillan 
Walter  J.  Nowell 
James  J.  Ott 
Pies.  Parker 
Steve  T.  Pruett 
Elmer  Patton 
Pete  Ponds 
Archie  L.  Purser 
Paul  B.  Quillian 


Calvin  R.  Reid 
Herbert  Rom  pel 
Ben  W.  Regner 
Sidney  M.  Stinson 
William  C.  Stokes 
Maynard  Sampler 
Coleman  Y.  Slaton 
Edwin  Stephens 
Jesse  D.  Taylor 
Clyde  O.  Thrower 
James  .\.  Tolbert 
John  H.  O.  Truede 
Cody  H.  Tucker 
Ben  F.  Tallant 
Roy  A.  Upton 
Dan.  Wilpitz 
Nathan  D.  Winnett 
Richard  Williams 
Everett  WiLson 
Leon  C.  Wi.x 
Marron  T.  Yancev 


Privates — First  Class 
Thomas  J.  Buchanan 
John  Case 
Joseph  Corey 
Marion  Green 
Charles  H.  Haire 
Joe  L.  Jolly 
Sanders  S.  Pace 
Roy  Sturde\ant 
Robert  Schuenemann 
Herbert  Thuesen 
Privates 
Irvon  M.  Atherton 
E.  R.  Brasher 
Harry  Brown  " 
Frank  M.  Barton 
Harold  Bellows 
Lewis  W.  Barger 
Thea  L.  Bradshaw 
George  \V.  Davis 
John  Flores 


Standlee  AL  Gameson 

Steven  Isdal 

Monroe  Livesay 

Fred  ilartin 

Ernest  G.  Meyer 

Henr\-  G.  ilcGowen 

Joseph  B.  McCartney 

Louie  Poli 

John  E.  Rudolph 

Charlie  T.  Ramthum 

Jim  Smith 

Clyde  B.  Sweetman 

Alfred  .\.  Schrimscher 

Grover  Shanks 

Jones  R.  Stanlev 

Arthur  T.  Self  ' 

Rufus  F.  Taylor 

Privates — Ordnance  Detachment 

John  F.  Donovan 

Alfred  Fischer 

Raymond  H.  Kirschner 

George  T.  Reidv 


COMPANY  "F,"  35th  INFANTRY 
Continued  from  page  1^4 


Corporals 
Earl  R.  Roubidoux 
Edward  P.  Pelate 
Aaron  Hall 
Homer  Williams 

Cooks 
John  B.  McMunn 
Edward  W.  Rickey 
Frank  W.  Simpson 
Stephen  Laskowski 

Mechanics 
George  Hunter 
Paul  Riggs 
Bert  Rhodes 
Samuel  S.  Myers 

Buglers 
James  L.  Hoffman 
John  Szura 

Privates — First  Class 
Nicholas  Adamopolous 
Gust  P.  Bassas 


Otto  Braza 

Stuart  G.  Cavell 
Albert  F.  Daiker 
Erail  G.  Dalluege 
Grel  Denes 
Herman  C.  Fivash 
Helmuth  C.  Frahm 
William  Fraunhofer 
John  E.  Gehrke 
John  W.  Glesener 
Benjamin  E.  Johnson 
Hans  B.  Johnson 
Joseph  Johnson 
McKinley  Johnson 
Arthur  E.  Johnston 
Charles  N.  Joyner 
Joseph  Kirsvnuski 
George  A.  Klockziem 
Charles  Kelena 
William  Knop.  Jr. 
George  A.  Kunz 
Ludwik  Lagud 


Elmer  T.  Land 
Cecil  C.  Leathers 
Paul  Leedom  . 
Clarence  B.  Lewis 
William  Love 
.Wex.  Magowski 
Loney  Martinez 
Frank  Michalski 
John  E.  ilooney 
Gust  Mercuris 
Prokopii  Owseichik 
John  Paris 
.\rthur  D.  Pratt 
Harrj'  .\.  Prowell 
George  Rae 
Frank  C.  Roberts 
Stefan  Sachanko 
George  F.  Sawtell 
Adam  Scazny 
Henry  F.  Schwass 
William  Sewell 
Harry  B.  Shugart 


Dave  F.  Yenosdell 
.\ndy  Zdillae 

Privates 

Joseph  Bernstein 
Ashley  H.  Doak 
Joseph  Eurich 
Peter  A.  Franzen 
Lewis  V.  Hart 
Olie  Henderson 
Jess  C.  Hurlburt 
Edward  W.  Jeppe 
Joseph  Kozma 
Fred  R.  Krause 
Joseph  Kuczmarski 
.\lbert  Ladwig 
Louis  F.  Lohse 
John  McCarthy 
Silvio  Milani 
Boyd  MundeU 
Curtis  C.  Newman 
.\lbert  W.  Xolting 


John  Paraskevopolous 
Hobert  W.  Pestle 
Ben  H.  Phillips 
Tony  Pliewik 
John  Polcynski 
John  Pugel 
Elwood  J.  Pacicot 
Bohumil  Routa 
Roy  W.  Shaul 
George  F.  Shyer 
Thomas  J.  Slinger 
Earl  A.  Smith 
George  B.  Smith 
Jakub  Staruck 
Edward  F.  Stiller 
James  J.  Svihla 
Frank  Terselich 
Joseph  W.  Williams 
Harvey  H.  Williamson 
Sideris  Zaferis 
.\dam  Zavislak 
JoeZuk 


294 


CAMP    TRAVIS    AND    THE    WORLD    WAR 

If         ■•'SI 


1st' Lieut.  Joseph  J.  Kavanagh 
1st  Lieut.  Roland  R.  Cross 


BOARD  OF  REVIEW 

Left  to  right 
Captain  Harry  D.  Wiley, 

President  of  Board 
Captain  A.  B.  Middle  ton 


1st  Lieut.  L.  A.  Bingaman 
Captain  John  S.  Turner 


MEDICAL  EXAMINING  BOARD,  MUSTERING  OUT  STATION 


First  row,  left  to  right 
1st  Lieut.  Robert  H.  Howard 
Captain  F.  W.  Sorell 
Captain  H.  C.  Creveling 
Major  Edward  Bailey 
Captain  O.  V.  Schroeter 
Captain  S.  D.  Whiting 
Captain  0.  H.  Fitzgerald 


Second  row 
1st  Lieut.  Jacob  Ader 
1st  Lieut.  Ralph  Lovelady 
1st  Lieut.  J.  F.  Traxler 
Captain  A.  W.  Gifford 
1st  Lieut.  M.  I.  Stein 
1st  Lieut.  Herman  B.  Seebold 


Third  row 
1st  Lieut.  John  W.  Baldwin 
1st  Lieut.  P.  L.  Hays 
1st  Lieut.  William  J.  Baker 
Captain  F.  F.  Finney 


Fourth  row 
1st  Lieut.  H.  G.  Hcrschle 
1st  Lieut.  L.  M.  Bush 
1st  Lieut.  Eugene  Calvelli 
1st  Lieut.  D.  H.  Nisbet 
1st  Lieut.  S.  W.  Reeves 


295] 


CAMP     TRAVIS     AND    THE     WORLD     WAR 


SCHOOL  FOR  BAKERS  AND  COOKS 


William  R.  Abel 
Celestine  Amoral 
James  S.  Armstrong 
Omer  C.  Arnold 
Henson  Atkinson 
Jesse  L.  Bailey 
Thomas  C.  Baldwin 
Floyd  F.  Ballard 
Emmet  O.  Bammel 
Charles  O.  Baxter 
Eugene  O.  Beaver 
Emil  F.  Beck 
Charlie  Beinhauer 
Jacob  L.  Benson 
Jefferson  C.  Benson 
Fred  J.  Berger 
Tommie  M.  Best 
Heno'  B.  Biles 
Edward  Bilkasky 
Jesse  Bischop 
Luther  D.  Bivins 
Elon  G.  Blakey 
Alexander  Borch 
Herbert  R.  Bocock 
Sydney  J.  Bodine . 
Frank  Boehle 
Joseph  V.  Boemer 
Milvern  Bolton 
Clifton  Boss 
Frank  Boutellier 
Martin  F.  Boze 
Charlie  Brinkraeyer 
Dewitt  T.  Bristown 


Lemoard  E.  Brinson 
Jason  C.  Brown 
Robert  B.  Brown 
John  Buliach 
Herman  E.  Burbrink 
Otis  L.  Burdine 
Walter  R.  Burks 
Paul  Butler 
Joseph  P.  Caffey 
Thomas  H.  Campbell 
Earl  E.  Campbell 
Joe  H.  Canfield 
Raymond  R.  Caperton 
John  R.  Carlson 
Corinto  Carmignani 
Claby  Carrol 
Levi  Carruth 
Yee  Bey  Chee 
Victor  C.  Clarke 
Walter  N.  Clarkson 
Joseph  E.  Cockerham 
James  L.  Cockran 
Amos  J.  Cogdill 
Walter  E.  Colbum 
Charles  M.  Collier 
Marion  H.  Collier 
Grant  Collins 
Henr\-  Collins 
Harvey  A.  Colvin 
Claud  L.  Cook 
Ramon  Cortez 
John  H.  Craig 
Archie  Crane 


Rue  D.  Crawford 
Marion  E.  Crume 
David  C.  Dalton 
Siebert  Damm 
John  S.  Davidson 
Charles  F.  Da\'is 
James  E.  Davis 
John  A.  Debus 
Ralph  Deguardi 
Guido  DelPapa 
John  J.  Denneny 
Warren  P.  Dieferderfer 
Edward  Dirks 
Robert  A.  Dixon 
Owen  W.  Dorien 
Earl  F.  Duckworth 
Bruce  B.  Duncan 
Robert  V.  Duncan 
George  M.  Dunn 
Edmond  Dunwoody 
Owen  A.  Dutton 
George  R.  Dyer 
Carl  D.  Earle 
Elbert  Edwards 
John  Exconomindis 
Lee  S.  Estes 
Jesse  J.  Farris 
Gilbert  Fischer 
Toney  Fischer 
Earl  D.  Fisher 
Lee  F.  Flake 
John  R.  Fleming 
Henr>'  E.  Flenner 


Willis  Floyd 
Lewis  H.  Foley 
H.  M.  Forste 
Edgar  Franks 
Grady  Fuller 
Charles  Galbaby 
Sylvester  Gandet 
Gus  Gandre 
Ignacio  P.  Garcia 
Leopoldo  Garcia 
Wladyslaw  Gawrj^lczyk 
Bernhardt  L.  Geldmeier 
Chailey  Gessman 
Virgil  L.  Gilbert 
Lester  Gill 
Henr>'  H.  Gimdt 
George  W.  Glunt 
Otto  Goldapp 
Orville  E.  Golding 
Louis  A.  Goldstein 
George  Gonter 
James  C.  Goodwin 
Michael  Gotch 
Oliver  W.  Gott 
Josh  Graham 
James  G.  Grantham 
Art  Gray 
Orland  O.  Green 
Ray  Green 
Ben  J.  Greving 
Alvro  E.  Griffin 
Lee  Griffin 
Robert  T.  Guthrie 


Nathan  Handelman 
John  C.  Hard>Tues 
Robert  R.  Harris 
James  W.  Harr>-aman 
Ernest  Hartfield 
Mathew  C.  Hartley 
Roland  K.  Harvey 
Benjamin  W.  Hawthorn 
Edward  V.  Hayes 
Lee  Helton 
Francis  Henderson 
Rufus  C.  Henson 
Elmer  C.  Herbkersman 
John  J.  Herbst 
George  R.  Herbin 
Lem  Herring 
William  F.  Herron 
Bernard  J.  Higgins 
Hallie  E.  Hill 
Luther  G.  Hilliard 
John  W.  Honea 
Martin  F.  Housch 
Clarence  J.  House 
Justin  Howard 
Ernest  B.  Howell 
John  A.  Hubbert 
.Alfred  W.  Hudson 
Horace  A.  Hunt 
Floid  P.  Ivey 
Elert  H.  Jacobson 
Mose  Jacobstein 
Albert  Jangel 
Emil  L.  Janisch 


[296] 


CAMP    TRAVIS    AND    THE    WORLD     WAR 


-  n  - 


.i~r 


f    mm  .. 


SCHOOL  FOR  BAKERS  AND  COOKS 


John  T.  Jenkins 
Ford  C.  Jewel! 
Bruno  R.  Johns 
Charles  H.  Johnson 
Clyde  C.  Johnson 
Glenn  G.  Johnson 
Robert  T.  Johnson 
Roy  D.  Johnson 
Arthur  Joiner 
Ennis  R.  Jones 
Lionel  Jones 
Thomas  Jones 
William  O.  Jones 
Weslie  E.  Josiassen 
Frank  Juarez 
Alfred  G.  Kahn 
Henry  Kaufman 


Stanley  Kayden 
Bryan  Kear 
Arthur  R.  Kellv 
Albert  S.  Kendall 
Alexander  S.  Kendrick 
Henry  Kerchofs 
Edgar  J.  Kinard 
Oscar  C.  King 
Frederick  W.  Kitcher 
John  Klimowski 
Oscar  F.  Knauth 
Roy  F.  Knowles 
Carl  F.  Koehler 
Frank  Koncel 
Joseph  Kontz 
William  Kopta 
Ben  J.  Kosug 


John  H.  Kotrla 
Louis  Krenz 
Joseph  W.  Kuerschen 
Edwin  A.  Lambrecht 
James  J.  Lanier 
Otto  R.  Lankford 
George  V.  Leber 
Fred  Lehde 
Herman  Lendway 
Anthonv  Leonelli 
Elbert  A.  Lesly 
James  R.  Lewis 
Alejandro  Lichtenberger 
Frank  H.  Lidgett 
Melvin  Litten 
Charles  Long 
Reagan  Long 


John  Lontos 
Frank  J.  Lopez 
Leonard  L.  Lowrence 
John  W.  Loven 
Cornelius  Lynch 
Lloyd  L.  Lynch 
Edward  A.  Lyon 
Roscoe  C.  Mack 
Charles  R.  Mackey 
John  J.  MacVoy 
James  A.  Maddux 
Roy  A.  Magnuson 
Rube  W.  Marler 
Claud  H.  Martin 
Fred  A.  Martin 
John  W.  Martin 
Julian  Martin 


Lester  B.  Martin 
Ollie  Mattingly 
Horace  Maxwell 
James  A.  Maxwell 
J.  Carlton  McAfee 
Robert  C.  McCauley 
Fred  C.  McCleUan 
Roy  McClendon 
Lawrence  McCombs 
George  B.  McCormick 
Oliver  A.  McCormick 
James  F.  McCowen 
Walter  A.  McCreary 
Arthur  N.  McCuen 
Carl  N.  McDaniel 
Claudie  G.  McDonald 
Continued  on  page  299 


■*ifr%WJ!t 


k-^ 


■.i        -•  f.'J^ri.:-^    •■^ 


297] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


1st  Lieut.  Charles  O.  Huger 


FIRE  TRUCK  AND  HOSE  COMPANY  No.  315 
2nd  Lieut.  Joseph  L.  Hogan  Quartermaster  Sergeant  John  M.  Cross,  Chief  Engineer 


Sergeants — First  Class 

Fred  Harvey 
Claud  A.  Hart 
Louis  H.  Heacock 
Thomas  A.  AVorrell 
Walter  D.  Marshall 

Sergeants 

William  L.  Newhouse 
Henry  M.  Toudouze 
Bias  M.  Quintero 
Sidney  B.  Walraven 
John  D.  Rizzo 


Privates — First  Class 

Willie  F.  Basham 
Paul  S.  Graham 
Euell  E.  Geen 
Tillman  C.  Nichols 
George  C.  Thomas 
Arthur  J.  Carney 
Jesse  Kelley 
Floyd  C.  Francisco 
John  N.  Richardson 

Privates 
Alex  K.  Abramson 


Tony  Amico 
Lee  R.  Anderson 
Rufus  S.  Anderson 
John  M.  Baker 
James  B.  Beck 
Charles  O.  Benson 
John  Bernard 
Tom  W.  Brown 
Harold  R.  Parr 
Oscar  G.  Bunger 
Thomas  Y.  Butler 
James  M.  Canter 
Joseph  Cashion 
Thomas  W.  Duffel 


J.  B.  Francis,  Jr. 
John  J.  Donohue 
William  O.  Good 
Paul  Farris 
.\rchie  Graham 
James  R.  London 
Homer  A.  ^lahan 
Roy  D.  Martin 
George  B.  Mayfield 
James  R.  McClure 
Robert  W.  Mcllvain 
Wallace  V.  McMorries 
William  H.  Overturf 
Edward  L.  Bvers 


Victor  H.  Peterson 
James  A.  Rea 
Arthur  L.  Savage 
John  W.  Scott 
Jim  Theodorian 
Don  D.  Wallen 
Dallas  West 
C.  T.  McMuUen 
Remon  B.  Lopez 
Charles  O.  Benson 


THEY  HAD  THE  M.  P.  BUFFALOED 

Here's  the  Only  Outfit  That  Could  Break  the  Speed  Limit- 
Fire  Department 


-thi 


CAMP  TRAVIS  FIRE  DEPARTMENT  was  estab- 
lished July  27,  1917,  and  consisted  of  one  borrowed 
horse-drawn  apparatus  from  San  Antonio.  This 
apparatus  carried  750  feet  of  hose.  The  personnel  con- 
sisted of  soldiers  and  civilians  employed  by  the  McKenzie 
Construction  Co. 

Under  the  direction  of  Captain  Harry  L.  Collins,  16oth 
Depot  Brigade,  the  first  fire  marshal,  the  Fire  Department 
was  equipped  with  six  triple  combination  pumping  engines 
and  one  chemical  car.  This  apparatus  is  housed  in  four 
stations  in  Camp  Travis  and  one  station  at  Remount 
Station  No.  2.  Captain  Collins  was  succeeded  by  First 
Lieutenant  C.  O.  Huber,  fire  marshal,  and  Second  Lieu- 
tenant J.  L.  Hogan,  assistant  fire  marshal,  who  are  now 
in  charge. 

The  alarm  system  terminates  in  Fire  Station  No.  1, 
known  as  headquarters,  and  alarms  are  transmitted  simul- 
taneously to  all  other  stations  by  means  of  a  belt  line  and 
Gamewell  fire  alarm  system.  The  camp  is  divided  into 
fourteen  fire  zones,  and  a  running  card  has  been  provided 
indicating  what  apparatus  will  respond  to  fires  within  a 
certain  zone  on  first  and  second  alarms. 

Instruction  is  given  to  the  men  by  efficient  instructors 
who  have  held  responsible  positions  with  fire  departments 
of  cities  having  most  modern  fire  equipment.  This  instruc- 
tion includes  hose  and  ladder  practice,  carrying  lines  with 
and  without  water  pressure,  up  fire  ladders  or  stairways. 
Test  runs  are  made  at  night  and  fire  conditions  are  assim- 
ilated as  nearly  as  possible.  Comments  and  criticisms 
are  made  on  these  runs,  and  drivers  instructed  as  to  short- 


est routes  to  take  to  reach  certain  points,  avoiding  sharp 
turns.  Crews  are  permitted  to  go  sight-seeing  frequently 
for  the  purpose  of  famiUarizing  themselves  with  the  loca- 
tion of  water  plugs,  streets,  etc. 

In  addition  to  fire  fighting,  firemen  are  required  to  act 
as  inspectors  of  the  various  fire  appliances  distributed 
throughout  the  camp.  Appliances  in  barracks  and  quarters 
are  inspected  weekly  by  firemen  of  the  different  stations; 
warehouses  are  inspected  daily  by  non-commissioned 
officers,  and  weekly  by  the  fire  marshal  or  his  assistant. 
It  is  this  careful  fire  prevention  work  that  has  helped 
materially  to  reduce  fires  in  this  camp  to  a  mini- 
mum. 

In  addition  to  the  motor  fire  apparatus  there  are  located 
in  the  different  zones  tliirty-six  hose  reels,  fully  equipped, 
which  are  manned  by  the  organizations  occupying  the 
buildings  near  which  they  are  located.  Hand-drawn 
chemical  engines  are  also  placed  near  some  of  the  more 
important  buildings.  Five  thousand,  five  hundred  feet 
of  two  and  one-half  inch  fire  hose  is  carried  on  the  several 
apparatus  composing  the  Camp  Travis  Fire  Department, 
which  can  be  laid  into  ten  lines,  each  of  which  will  have 
engine  pressure. 

In  the  event  of  an  alarm  at  night  the  men  can  clothe 
themselves  and  be  ready  to  leave  the  house  within  fifteen 
seconds  after  an  alarm  is  turned  in.  In  one  instance,  when 
time  was  taken,  a  run  of  several  blocks  was  made  and  a 
stream  of  water  was  playing  on  the  supposed  fire  one 
minute  and  thirty  seconds  after  the  receiver  was  first 
taken  from  a  fire  alarm  telephone  nearby. 


[298] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


riRE  TRUCK  AND  HOSE  COMPAXV  No.  315 


SCHOOL  FOR  BAKERS  AND  COOKS 
Continued  from  page  297 


Sedric  E.  McEachern 
Lawrence  McFarland 
James  J.  ilcGivney 
Thomas  V.  McGrath 
(leorge  C.  McGreev  y 
Paul  McHenry 
Ross  D.  Mcllhenny 
Gordon  R.  McKissack 
Leonard  McLemore 
Earl  B.  McMahen 
James  J.  McMahen 
Albert  S.  McMickle 
James  R.  Mearham 
Charles  G.  Meyers 
Joseph  A.  Mitchell 
William  V.  Mitchell 
Joe  T.  Moore 
Ivan  H.  Morris 
Gordon  M.  Morrison 
Edward  S.  Morrow 
Lee  Moseley 
Elbert  Mullin 
Elbert  A.  Munger 
Walter  W.  Murray 
Adolph  J.  Myers 
Joe  F.  Mynar 
Cleveland  Xayer 
Bernard  O.  Newmann 
Ramon  Novak 
Joseph  O'Donnell 
John  T.  Ofzcarzak 
Andrew  G.  O'Leary 
Bernard  Olshanski 
Dan  O'Meara 
Pedro  Ortega 
William  V.  Osborne 
John  W.  Otto 
Ira  M.  Owens 
Samuel  M.  Pack 
Louis  Pallaye 
Ordin  \ .  Parker 


Ralph  E.  Parnell 
Omer  Paschall 
Irl  Paswater 
Thomas  Patronelli 
Lamar  Paul 
Walter  Peters 
James  E.  Phillips 
Oscar  W.  Phillips 
Americo  Puerotti 
Wm.  E.  Polster 
Little  O.  Porter 
Charles  E.  Price 
Fred  Price 
Eugene  O.  Proctor 
Kyle  H.  Purdy 
Emil  H.  Quasi 
Richard  Ralmondo 
Robert  B,  Rathbun 
Claud  H.  Reagan 
George  B.  Reed 
James  W.  Richardson 
Charles  E.  Riehl 
Ernest  R.  L.  Risse 
Oba  Roberts 
Wade  S.  Roberts 
Irwin  H.  Robinson 
Luther  Rochelle 
Percy  B.  Rogers 
Earl  W.  Ross 
Oscar  L.  Rowlett 
Porter  F.  Rusk 
Joseph  Salachna 
James  J.  Salla\- 
Cleve  J.  Schacklett 
Kurt  T.  Scharf 
Joe  R.  Schley 
Edward  W.  Schmidt 
Henry  P.  Schmitt 
Arthur  Schnoor 
John  Schuck 
William  H.  Schultz 


Bernhard  P.  Schulze 
Alvah  H.  Scott 
Winfred  G.  Scott 
Mid  Seale 
Charles  J.  Sharman 
Robert  E.  L.  Scheffield 
John  T.  Shelton 
Thomas  J.  Shipley 
Leslie  Short 
Ernest  Simmons 
Brownie  A.  Sims 
Ernest  T.  Sims 
Mathew  Simon 
Willie  L.  Slaton 
John  W.  Slawson 
Bruce  M.  Smith 
Charles  F.  Smith 
Elmer  J.  Smith 
Frank  H.  Smith 
Hubert  R.  Smith 
Walter  T.  Smith 
\'erdon  E.  Speer 
Perry  R.  Spicer 
Otis  Spikes 
Ernest  H.  Stanberry 
John  J.  Stanitis 
Raymond  S.  Steinbacher 
Tonev  Stock 
Kyle'H.  Stokes 
Frank  Stoklasa 
Ivan  W.  Stone 
James  H,  Stout 
Joe  N.  Strahan 
Charles  R.  Sturn 
Bryant  A.  Sullivan 
\'ern  C.  Suydam 
Gerhard  P.  Synatschk 
Elgin  F.  Talley 
Thomas  W.  Terry 
Charles  B.  Thomas 
Clay  Thomjjson 


Joe  A.  Thrash 
Bernard  H.  Thuman 
John  W.  Tidwell 
Earl  O.  Tillerson 
George  Tribble 
Stanley  Tomkiewcz 
Harry  Trovarelli 
Robert  S.  Truesdell 
Charles  N.  Turner 
Thomas  A.  Underwood 
John  J.  Ungrady 
Wm.  D.  Vass 
David  W.  Vaughn 
John  M.  Venker 
Joseph  D.  Verchereau 
Aloisius  Wachter 
Eugene  A.  Wallen 
Theodore  R.  Walff 
William  H.  Walters 
Elmer  H.  Warden 
Hugh  B.  Watters 
Albert  L.  Welch 
Orland  W.  Wells 
John  P.  Wenzel 
Joe  S.  Wheeler 
Charles  J.  White 
Ernest  M.  V.  W^hite 
John  F.  Wick 
Theo.  O.  Wilke 
Billie  C.  WilUams 
Earl  E.  Williams 
Edgar  Williams 
Ernest  J.  Williams 
Frank  R.  Williams 
James  A.  Williams 
JI.  E.  WilUams 
Joseph  P.  Williamson 
Charles  Williard 
William  A.  Willis 
Floyd  M.  Wilsie 
Joe  C.  Wilson 


Roy  Wilson 
Harry  Wiltbanks 
Frank  J.  Witkowski 
Alexander  Wojcik 
Dink  W.  Wood 
Seth  Wood 
Robert  H.  Wooley 
William  M.  Wueritz 
Stanley  J.  Zadwadski 
Adolph  Zobal 
Jim  15.  Adams 
Howard  Bcnefiel 
Emmet  R.  Bowerman 
O.  D.  Bell 
Roy  J.  Block 
.\loin  S.  Baumbach 
John  W.  Bigon 
John  Cesnovar 
Edgar  Rov  Cameron 
Fred  W.  Ebel 
Paul  W.  Frost 
.\lbert  Griffin 
Leonard  E.  Haug 
John  Hacay 
Rymond  D.  Harris 
Joseph  Jarrzynka 
Efford  Lawrence 
Ira  C.  Manire 
John  M.  Morgan 
Wm.  T.  Mc.\mis 
Williard  H.  Purfeerst 
Andres  Rodgriguez 
Pearl  A.  Scott 
George  C.  Strong 
Arthur  A.  Steyart 
Oscar  B.  Smith 
Walter  S.  Williams 
Cecil  C.  Williams 
Floyd  R.  Womack 
Thos.  M.  Wolverton 


[299] 


X 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


Sergeants — First  Class 

Theodore  D.  Comman 
John  S.  Surber 
Clarence  E.  Gibbs 
Howard  P.  Halsey 
Verne  Breazeale 
David  B.  Whitehurst 
William  L.  Bell 
Leslie  C.  Belden 


SERVICE  PARK  UNIT  348 
1st  Lieut.,  M.T.C.,  David  A.  McGale 

Sergeants 

Joel  A.  Clark 
Roger  B.  Davenport 
Michael  Mahelsky 
P.  Stanley  Crocker 
Artemus  Driggers 
John  A.  Bleyer 


Cook 
Elmer  G.  Adams 

Corporals 
William  J.  Treahy 
Joseph  E.  Tremblay 
John  Zadejko 
William  E.  Anderson 
George  W.  Falk 


1300; 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


SERVICE  PARK  tHSTIT  348 


Privates — First  Class 

Frank  Bowling 
Francis  E.  Noonan 
George  J.  Anderson 
Dennis  T.  Callahan 
Albert  J.  Cronan 
Milton  \V.  Dooley 
Lawrence  A.  Jennings 


Marvin  E.  Rutherford 
Charles  Loeffler 
Louis  F.  Yates 

Privates 

Loy  L.  Abernathy 
Rudolph  Feyrer 
Thomas  Karr 


Fred  W.  Langerhans 
Arthur  B.  Youngs 


Men  on  Special  Duty 

Henry  A.  Brewster 
Jim  H.  Deberry 


301 


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CAMP    TRAVIS    AND    THE    WORLD    WAR 


V 


BKlGADlEk-GENEKAL   W.  H.  JOHNSTON   AND    STAFl- 


General  Johnston  commanded  the  famous  Texas  Brigade  of  the  90th  Division,  composed  of  th;  359th  and  360th  Infantry 
and  the  345th  Machine  Gun  Battalion.     The  men  of  these  units  upheld  the  best  fighting  traditions  of  the  Lone  Star  State 


THEY  HELPED  ROUT  AUTOCRACY 

Ninetieth  Division  Overcame  Great  Handicaps  and   Made  Raw  Rookies  into 

Soldiers  Feared  by  Huns 


IT  was  in  early  September  of  1917  that  long  trains 
began  to  empty  crowds  of  civilians  into  the  partially 
completed  Camp  Travis.  There  were  farmer  boys 
from  Texas  and  Oklahoma,  dazed  by  the  rapidity  with 
which  the  selective  draft  had  taken  them  from  their  homes 
to  make  them  soldiers  of  the  republic.  There  were  round- 
shouldered,  pale-faced  young  men  from  the  stores  and 
offices  of  the  cities.  They  huddled  together  and  wondered 
what  was  coming  ne.xt. 

It  was  in  late  May  and  early  June  of  1918  that  columns 
of  erect,  well-trained  yoimg  soldiers  silently  boarded  once 
more  the  long  lines  of  trains.  There  were  no  pale  faces, 
no  round  shoulders.  Each  man  was  in  the  pink  of  phy- 
sical condition.  There  was  nothing  of  uncertainty  in  their 
faces.  These  men  knew  that  they  were  embarking  on  the 
first  stage  of  a  journey  which  they  hoped  would  end  in 
Berlin.  They  were  stern-faced.  They  had  a  job  to  do 
and  they  knew  how  to  do  it. 

That  in  brief  is  the  history  of  the  Ninetieth  Division,  a 
division  which  was  in  the  last  grip  with  the  forces  of  autoc- 
racy, a  division  which  left  its  dead  on  many  Argonne 
fields  under  the  little  white  crosses;  a  division  which  fought 
with  veteran  brilliancy  until  that  November  day  when  the 
order  came  to  cease  fire. 

There  was  the  usual  confusion  in  the  beginning  of  the 
trainings  but  there  was  no  failure  in  achieving  the  desired 
result.  The  men  of  Texas  and  Oklahoma,  called  to  service 
under  the  President's  proclamation,  were  crude  at  first; 
but  when  they  left  Camp  Travis  in  the  first  flush  of  the 
summer  they  were  as  perfectly  trained  as  any  division 
that  ever  left  an  American  camp. 

Results  began  to  show  early.  Major  General  Henry  T. 
Allen,  commander  of  the  division,  had  a  staff  which  the 
War  Department  had  selected  with  care.     Problems  of 


training  were  quickly  solved  and  programs  of  work  put 
into  effect.  After  less  than  a  month  of  the  first  rudiments 
of  military  training  the  360th  Regiment  went  on  a  six- 
mile  hike  without  having  a  man  drop  out.  The  farmer 
boys,  the  clerks,  the  mechanics  were  learning  the  business 
of  soldiering  rapidly.  Col.  C.  H.  Conrad,  Jr.,  who  was  in 
command  of  that  hike,  had  only  words  of  praise  for  the 
men  who,  but  four  weeks  before,  had  been  going  about 
their  civilian  business,  not  knowing  squads  east  from 
squads  west. 

Just  four  weeks  from  the  time  the  first  of  the  Ninetieth's 
men  came  into  the  wilderness  which  Stone  and  Webster 
men  were  pounding  into  a  cantonment,  2,000  men  were 
reviewed  by  Major  General  Allen.  They  were  of  the 
360th,  a  regiment  that  was  to  later  fire  some  of  the  many 
"last  shots"  into  the  retreating  Huns.  General  Allen,  at 
that  early  date,  expressed  his  faith  in  his  men  and  his 
opinion  that  the  division  would  make  history,  just  as  the 
fathers  and  grandfathers  of  the  Texans  and  Oklahomans 
had  made  history  in  previous  wars. 

It  was  not  until  October  14  that  the  Ninetieth's  men 
really  began  to  feel  that  they  were  real  soldiers.  On  that 
day  550  rifles  of  the  1917  model  came  to  Camp  Travis. 
Previous  work  had  been  done  with  the  wooden  guns  so 
much  in  vogue  in  the  early  days  of  America's  entry  into 
the  war.  But  the  men  who  had  used  wooden  guns  soon 
learned  to  use  the  genuine  weapwn.  Piles  of  dead  Huns 
in  the  Argonne  testify  to  that  fact. 

Work  was  intensive.  Over  in  Fort  Worth  the  National 
Guardsmen  were  being  trained  in  the  Thirty-sixth  Di- 
vision. They  had  the  advantage  of  long  months  on  the 
border  in  1916.  The  Ninetieth  had  to  go  some  to  over- 
come that  handicap  but  in  the  end  they  won  out.  The 
Ninetieth  was  in  France  when  the  Thirty-sixth  was  still 


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(M11CI;KS    :3i:)th  machim:  (,L\    HATTALIOX,  90th  drisiox 


having  "last  final  grand  reviews"  on  Fort  Worth's  dusty 
streets.  Pluck  and  perseverance  showed  what  the  National 
Army  could  do. 

Texas,  the  state  which  was  once  a  republic  holding 
against  Mexico  a  long  stretch  of  valuable  frontier,  a  state 
whose  history  has  been  written  in  the  blood  of  those 
martyrs  to  liberty,  Crockett,  Bowie  and  Travis,  a  state 
which  defied  the  efforts  of  German  junkers  to  colonize 
within  its  boundaries,  gave  to  the  Ninetieth  the  famous 
Texas  Brigade,  commanded  by  Brig.  Gen.  W.  H.  Johnston. 
This  consisted  of  the  359th  and  360th  Infantry  and  the 
345th  Machine  Gun  Company.  How  well  it  upheld  the 
fighting  traditions  of  Texas  another  historian  will  tell  when 
the  peace  treaty  is  signed  and  the  world  war  is  ended. 
Fragments  of  press  dispatches  indicate  that  it  will  add 
another  chapter  to  the  glorious  history  of  the  Lone  Star 
State.  In  this  brigade  were  none  but  Texas  men  and 
Texas  officers. 

The  Ninetieth  Division  had  hardships  of  which  the  men 
of  the  Eighteenth  knew  nothing.  When  the  Camp 
Travis  pioneer  troops  arrived  the  cantonment  was  not 
completed.  There  was  a  lack  of  many  of  the  comforts  to 
which  the  Eighteenth's  men  have  always  been  accustomed. 
It  was  not  until  November  that  W.  N.  Patten  gave  the 
final  pay  checks  to  the  Stone  &  Webster  men  and  the 
Camp  Travis  of  to-day  was  finally  completed. 

Back  home  the  soldiers  left  anxious  loved  ones.  The 
whole  idea  of  an  army  on  a  selective  service  basis  was  so 
new  that  many  relatives  of  the  men  had  fears  and  worries 
which  were  agitated  by  Hun  propagandists.  The  new 
soldiers,  caught  in  the  whirl  of  military  activities,  were  not 
as  diUgent  letter  writers  as  they  might  have  been.  To 
tell  the  people  of  Texas  and  Oklahoma  just  how  things 
were  going  in  camp,  how  well  the  boys  were  being  fed  and 
cared  for,  how  they  amused  themselves  in  their  leisure 
hours  and  how  they  were  being  rounded  out  into  fearless 
and  physically  fit  American  soldiers  was  the  duty  of  the 


publicity  bureau  of  the  camp  and  so  on  November  13  the 
news  bureau  was  established  and  clever  articles  went  back 
to  the  home-town  papers.  It  was  a  morale  measure  which 
proved  a  tremendous  success. 

In  the  early  days  of  the  division's  training  there  was  no 
place  for  the  visitors  to  camp  to  see  their  soldier  kinsmen 
except  in  the  barracks  or  at  the  Y.  M.  C.  A.  buildings, 
which  at  that  time  were  not  numerous.  It  meant  much 
to  the  soldiers  to  have  the  Hostess  House  open  on  No- 
vember 18,  1917.  It  brought  the  touch  of  home  so  needed 
in  the  city  of  unpainted  barracks  and  Texas  mud. 

It  was  on  November  20  that  the  men  of  the  division 
first  went  into  the  trenches.  Major  George  Grunert  had 
worked  out  an  intricate  trench  system  and  the  Ninetieth's 
soldiers  soon  were  learning  to  go  over  the  top  with  the 
pep  and  momentum  they  had  shown  in  their  previous 
military  training. 

Many  of  the  men  now  in  France  if  asked  to  name  the 
greatest  day  in  the  division's  history,  prior  to  the  battle 
period,  would  say  Thanksgiving  Day,  1917,  for  it  was  on 
that  memorable  occasion  that  the  aviators  from  Kelly 
Field,  who  had  counted  on  a  sweeping  football  victory 
over  the  doughboys,  went  down  to  bitter  defeat  before  a 
crowd  of  20,000  spectators  in  the  Camp  Travis  stadium. 
The  score  was  twelve  to  seven  and  the  team  of  the  Nine- 
tieth included:  Madden,  Tuck,  Diller,  Dittmar,  Lane, 
Simpson,  Hart,  Puett,  Grigg,  Dotson  and  Prendergast. 

Among  the  Oklahomans  in  the  Ninetieth's  ranks  were 
several  thousand  Indians.  Chiefs  of  tribes,  many  of  them 
millionaires  by  reason  of  large  oil  holdings,  became  $30- 
a-month  men  and  quickly  adapted  themselves  to  the  white 
man's  system  of  military  training. 

Late  in  May  tearful  girls — for  the  division's  men  could 
love  like  they  could  fight — wiped  their  eyes  as  jitneys 
brought  them  back  to  San  Antonio  from  farewells.  Out 
in  the  darkness  the  "rebel  yell"  could  be  heard  as  the 
trains  pulled  out.    The  Ninetieth  was  going  away. 


305 


CAMP    TRAVIS     AND    THE     WORLD     WAR 


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CAMP     TRAVIS     AND     THE     WORLD    WAR 


BATTLE  HISTORY  OF  THE  NINETIETH  DIVISION 

Texas  Fighting  Traditions  Were  Brilliantly  Upheld  by  Soldiers 

Who   Trained  at  Travis 

By  BRIGADIER  GENERAL  J.  P.  O'NEIL,  Commanding  90th  Division 

Editor's  Note:  This  battle  history  of  the  Ninetieth  Division  is  the  first  complete  account  of  its 
engagements  to  be  published.  It  is  prepared  e.-pecially  for  "Camp  Travis  and  its  Part  in  the 
World  War"  by  Brigadier  General  J.  P.  O'Neil,  who  took  command  of  the  division  when  Major 
General  Henry  T.  Allen  was  placed  in  command  of  the  Eighth  Army  Corps.  The  brevity  of  the  story 
does  not  lessen  its  significance,  nor  do  the  unadorned  phrases  hide  the  great  achievements  with 
which  they  deal.  This  is  enough  for  Texas  and  Oklahoma:  "The  Ninetieth  Division  never  with- 
drew from  a  foot  of  ground  it  had  been  ordered  to  hold.  It  fulfilled  every  mission  assigned  in 
less  than  the  time  allotted."  There  is  the  whole  story  of  the  Ninetieth.  Volumes  could  not  em- 
bellish that  record. 


Division   sailed 
The    majority, 


CERTAIN  units  of  the  Ninetieth 
direct  from  New  York  to  France, 
however,  passed  through  England.  On  arrival  the 
165th  Field  Artillery  Brigade  was  sent  to  the  artillery 
training  area  near  Bordeaux.  The  remainder  of  the 
division  was  concentrated  in  training  area  No.  14 
with  headquarters  at  Aignay-le-Duc,  a 
picturesque  village  near  Dijon.  Here 
the  troops  underwent  six  weeks  of 
training  under  supervision  of  experts  from 
General  Headquarters,  assisted  by  officers 
of  the  French  Army,  who  praised  our  men 
highly  for  their  ardor  and  skill.  From 
the  training  area  the  di\'ision  moved  to 
the  vicinity  of  Toul,  where  it  relieved  the 
First  Division,  its  sector  extending  from 
Pont-a-Mousson  westward  to  Limey. 
Preparations  for  the  St.  Mihiel  drive 
had  already  begun.  The  sector  by  day 
seemed  deserted,  but  at  night  patrols 
pushed  into  No-Man's-Land  cleaning 
abandoned  trenches  and  cutting  wire, 
while  in  rear  every  road  was  crowded 
with  trucks,  gims,  men  and  tanks  moving 
to  position.  At  5  a.  m.,  September 
12th,  after  an  artillery  preparation  of 
four  hours,  the  division  assaulted.  By 
2  p.  m.  all  objectives  had  been  reached, 
in  spite  of  steep  ravines,  dense  wood, 
barbed  wire,  steel  nets,  concrete  trenches, 
and  machine  guns.  At  one  point  the 
infantry  was  held,  but  fire  delivered  by 
the  153rd  Field  Artillery  Brigade  broke 
the  resistance. 

During  the  night  of  September  12th  and  13th,  the 
infantry  exploited  the  success.  One  battalion  in  Bois 
Venchere  encountered  two  regiments  of  hostile  infantry. 
A  hand-to-hand  struggle  ensued  in  which  the  enemy  was 
routed. 

On  the  14th,  the  Norroy  quarries  and  Bois  de  Pretre 
were  carried,  and  on  following  day  the  advance  continued 
till  the  Hindenburg  line  was  reached.  On  the  23rd,  a 
raiding  party  penetrated  that  line,  a  feat  accomplished, 
it  is  believed,  by  only  one  other  division  during  the  St. 
Mihiel  operations.  Throughout  the  advance  and  the.  en- 
suing period  of  reorganization,  the  enemy  from  positions 


^t^  Wli^ifajfe^ 


J.  P.  O'NEIL, 
Brigadier  General 


east  of  the  Moselle  maintained  a  heavy  and  continuous 
fire,  which  not  only  enfiladed  our  positions,  but  came 
diagonally  from  the  rear. 

On  October  10th  the  Ninetieth  Division  was  reUeved 
by  the  Seventh  Division,  and  immediately  embussed  for 
the  Verdun  sector.  Before  the  last  elements  arrived 
there  it  moved  forward  as  reserve 
of  the  Third  Corps.  On  the  night  of 
October  21st  and  22nd,  the  division 
reUeved  the  Fifth  Division  in  Bois  des 
Rappes.  At  3  p.m.,  October  23rd,  ad- 
vancing in  the  midst  of  a  tremendous 
artillery  duel,  it  took  and  held  the 
towns  of  Bantheville  and  Bourrut  and 
the  high  grounds  northwest  of  them. 
During  the  next  week  the  division  im- 
proved its  pMDsition,  reaching  the  Banthe- 
\'ille-Aincreville  road  and  holding  it 
despite  the  hostile  artillery  fire  which 
veterans  of  Cantigny  and  Soissons  state 
was  during  this  period  the  most  terrific 
they  had  ever  experienced. 

On  November  1st  at  5.30  a.m.,  after 
two  hours  of  artillery  preparations,  the 
di\ision  again  assaulted,  encountering 
the  bes.t  divisions  of  the  German  army. 
The  fighting  was  desperate,  the  hostile  ar- 
tillerymen firing  over  open  sights  till  sur- 
rotmded.  Our  infantry  was  splendidly 
supported  by  seventy-fives  of  the  155th 
Field  Artillery  Brigade. 

When  the  infantry  was  held,  batteries 
galloped  forward  under  machine  gun 
fire,  and  in  spite  of  losses  literally  blew 
the  hostile  positions  off  the  map.  By  9  p.m.  the  entire 
Freya  line,  including  Hill  243  and  the  town  of  Villers- 
devant-Dun,  had  been  taken.  The  division  pressed  the 
pursuit,  reaching  the  Meuse  on  November  3rd  and  taking 
Wisepf)e  on  November  5th. 

On  November  9th  it  crossed  the  river,  and  after  a  night 
march  of  twenty  kilometers  again  attacked.  By  4  p.m., 
November  10th,  Baalon  was  taken,  and  our  troops  were 
fighting  in  Stenay  from  which  the  enemy  were  driven 
during  the  night.  The  average  advance  made  by  the 
division  at  St.  Mihiel  was  six  kilometers,  and  at  Verdun 
twenty-two  kilometers. 


308] 


CAMP    TRAVIS     AND    THE    WORLD    WAR 


Presentation  of  Colors  to  Texas  Brigade  of  90th  Division 


The  division  was  under  fire  from  August  20th  to  No- 
vember 11th  with  the  exception  of  seven  days  occupied  in 
changing  sector — seventy-five  days  without  relief.  During 
that  time  it  went  over  the  top  in  two  major  offensives  and 
seven  minor  operations,  not  counting  the  exploitations 
and  pursuits,  and  was  still  advancing  when  halted  by  the 
armistice. 

The  division  captured  25  pieces  of  heavy  artillery,  36 
trench  mortars,  122  light  machine  guns,  72  heavy  machine 
gims,  903  rifles,  and  immense  quantities  of  ammunition 
and  stores.  It  also  took  prisoners,  32  officers  and  1844 
men. 

Casualties  amounted  to  37  oflScers  and  1042  men  killed ; 
62  officers  and  1257  men  seriously  wounded;  123  officers 
and  4671  men  slightly  wounded;  81  officers  and  2094  men 
gassed,  and  7  officers  and  236  men  missing.  Of  the  gassed 
there  were  17  deaths,  and  1204  were  evacuated. 

The  Ninetieth  Division  never  withdrew  from  a  foot  of 
groimd  it  had  been  ordered  to  hold.  It  fulfilled  every 
mission  assigned  in  less  than  the  time  allotted.  It  has 
had  less  than  half  a  dozen  battle  stragglers  charged  against 


its  record.  Not  only  did  it  gain  the  objectives  in  every 
operation  in  which  it  took  part,  but  it  never  failed  to  reach 
and  pass  the  exploitation  line.  At  the  conclusion  of  the 
armistice  the  Ninetieth  Division  was  assigned  with  the 
Eighty-ninth,  its  comrade  throughout  the  campaign,  to 
the  Seventh  Corps  of  the  Third  Army. 

As  part  of  the  Seventh  Corps,  the  division  marched  from 
Stenay  across  Luxemburg  to  Rhenish  Prussia.  The  Sev- 
enth Corps  having  been  designated  as  reserve  of  the  Third 
Army,  the  Ninetieth  Division  shortly  before  Christmas 
settled  into  winter  quarters  along  the  Moselle  River  in  the 
vicinity  of  Berncastel,  where  it  was  rejoined  by  the  165th 
Field  Artillery  Brigade. 

From  mobilization  to  the  close  of  the  campaign  the 
division  was  commanded  by  Major  General  Henry  T. 
Allen. 

Shortly  after  the  conclusion  of  the  armistice  General 
Allen  was  assigned  to  command  the  Eighth  Army  Corps. 
Command  of  the  division  then  passed  to  Brigadier  General 
J.  P.  O'Neil,  who  continued  in  command  during  the  march 
into  Germany,  as  part  of  the  army  of  occupation. 


[309] 


/^ 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


COMPANY  "F,"  218th  ENGINEERS 

Continued  from  page  S06 


Lester  E.  Biddle 
Ludwig  Blume 
William  H.  Bodine 
Charles  W.  Brice 
Rajinond  J.  Cassell 
Frederick  C.  Champignon 
\'incenzo  Cippolone 
John  L.  Clementz 
Jacob  Deckman 
John  W.  Detrick 
Anthony  J.  Dietrich 
Raymond  E.  Dorr 
Joseph  R.  Forgue 


Matt  Gastrom 
William  Glatstein 
Julius  Grossman 
Lester  J.  Grover 
William  R.  Grover 
John  L.  Guthrie 
Clifford  C.  Hansen 
John  J.  Halaszek 
Frank  Hennick 
James  W.  Hopper 
Hiram  G.  Hunter 
Ra>Tnond  Lee 
Arthur  W.  Lenihan 


Fiore  Martella 
Henr>-  Mason 
Frank  Mateer 
Frank  Miskieloric 
Charles  R.  Moranville 
Charles  Parliament 
Robert  E.  Pearson 
Alfonso  Piano 
William  Louis  Powell 
Robert  J.  Power 
William  G.  Pruitt 
Jasper  H.  Purcell 
Benjamin  Rappelyea 


Paul  H.  Raymond 
Oscar  Swabinger 
Manuel  Shelton 
Ernest  E.  Strosnider 
Harvey  Taylor 
Oscar  Thirkildsen 
John  J.  Thompson 
Patrick  Tighe 
Paoli  Viola 
Robert  A.  Walker 
Adren  Westbrook 
William  Lee  Wilson 


Sergeant — First  Class 
John  A.  Phillips,  Jr. 

Sergeants 
Luther  Duncan 
Sherman  W.  Flowers 
Karl  G.  Greiner 
Stone  Steele 
Clovis  B.  Willingham 

Corporals 
Charles  A.  Doss 


18th  SANITARY  TRAIN 
Continued  from  page  $17 

AMBULANCE  COMPANY  No.  271 
1st  Lieut.  Ross  E.  Pridgen,  M.C.,  Commanding 
1st  Lieut.  John  Dimon,  M.C.  1st  Lieut.  W^illiam  E.  Lyon,  M.C. 


Mathias  P.  Hirt 
Thomas  C.  Grogan 
John  E.  HoUiway 
Joseph  R.  M.  Paxron 

Cooks 
Sam  S.  Taylor 
Jack  C.  Shipman 

Mechanic 
Watts  Taylor 

Privates — First  Class 
Ross  V.  Fomby 


James  E.  Lapthorn 
Ralph  E.  Martin 
William  Monahan 
Samuel  E.  Nelson 
Luther  L.  Orrell 
Thomas  J.  Smith 
Manuel  Valencia 
Charles  R.  Woodcock 

Privates 
Richard  W.  Brasch 
Ott  Clark 
Perfetto  Crespin 


Eddie  Cross 
Luther  T.  Uooley 
Christian  S.  Halderman 
Elmer  E.  Hawk 
Harry  Herrmann 
W'illiam  O.  Hockman 
Charles  M.  Lowriraore 
John  Matranga 
Glenn  C.  Phelps 
Leonard  \.  Pratt 
Floyd  J.  Price 
Jason  Robinson 


Bacillo  Sella 
James  R.  Stewart 
Alberto  Tognetti 
George  L.  Wade 
.\ce  Weaver 
George  E.  Wiltse 
Charles  W.  Yerkes 
Frank  J.  Ladman 
Arthur  S.  Moore 


AMBULANCE  COMP.\NY  No.  272 


Sergeants 

Jim'H.  Barrett 
Charles  L.  Halstead 
.\lbert  F.  Ott 
Louis  H.  Stephenson 
Ernest  C.  Gallagher 

Corporals 
John  L.  Holly 
George  T.  Kinner 

Cook 
Llovd  L.  Smith 


1st  Lieut.  Clyde  M.  Speck,  M.C. 
1st  Lieut.  Oscar  O.  Meredith,  M.C. 


Mechanic 
Fred  H.  Patterson 

Privates — First  Class 
Marion  E.  Davis 
Edward  Gisch 
Virgil  W.  Hamilton 
Sylvester  .\.  Pledger 
Calvin  F.  Shewbridge 

Privates 
Otto  Bemdt 
Sidney  J.  Dobbs 


Osa  W.  Ford 
Brj-an  George 
John  J.  Hassett 
Leslie  E.  Hite 
Joseph  W.  Lang 
Homer  K.  Lemlev 
Will  J.  Meyer 
Joseph  Nedlock 
Herman  B.  Schuetze 
WilUam  P.  Tobin 
W'illiam  Wedel 
Harry  Montgomery 


1st  Lieut.  Lucien  .\.  Ledoux,  M.C. 
1st  Lieut.  Joseph  F.  McNaught, 

Nickolas  B.  Knutson 
Samuel  N.  Gallegos 
WilUam  H.  Colwell 
Eari  L.  O'Neill 
Lester  Logan 
Wynne  N.  Hill 
Robert  Garcia 
Christopher  Goodwin,  Jr. 
Peter  S.  Marshik 
Joseph  Sarrica 
Clvde  E.  Simmons 
Tollie  M.  Clav 


M.C. 

Harmon  W^  Fisher 
Everett  George 
Jesse  George 
Theodore  L.  HUdebrand 
George  L.  Hutchison 
Ma.x  W.  Martens 
Franklin  T.  Maj'se 
Benlar  Miller 
James  S.  Poe 
James  O.  Thompson 
.■\dolph  F.  Uecker 
Robert  B.  Williams 


Sergeants 
Leonard  Pearson 
Edward  E.  Dejarlais 
Wade  Godown 

Corporab 
Samuel  R.  Stratton 
William  S.  Tuttle 


SANITARY  SQU.\D  No.  103 

Captain  Delos  L.  Van  Dine 

Privates — First  Class 
Edward  H.  Eiberger 
Emmett  L.  Finley 
Edward  T.  Youngblood 

Privates 
John  A.  .\skew 
Tronguelino  Baca 


Zem  E.  Boydstun 
Ross  C.  Conrad 
Ma>-nard  E.  Dewey 
Benton  H.  Fuller 
Clarence  E.  Gartland 
Cecil  H.  Rinehart 
Frank  E.  Simon 


Sergeant — First  Class 
William  H.  Curran 

Sergeants 

Frank  Brown 
Ray  C.  .\nderson 


SANITARY  SQUAD  No.  104 

Captain  James  W.  Conley,  Medical  Corps 

Corporals  Ernest  O.  Barfield 

WilUamT.Daly  ^'^^ii'L'fetLn 

Glenn  Dunlap  (.j^^^i^^  p  Qiosskruetz 

Privates— First  Cuss  .     ,    Pnjatfs 

Andrew  Buchmsky 


Ben.  C.  Bahr 


Lewis  D.  Coate 


Joseph  E.  Cunningham 
Floyd  W.  Gustine 
John  H.  Hoslie 
Horace  Griggs 
James  B.  Kibler 
Grady  Rosson 
Erich  Schmitz 


[310] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


W.  K.  Lloyd 

W.  C.  Moffett 


SOME   CHAPLAINS   OF  THE   18th  DIVISION 
Left  to  right 
J.  P.  Thornbury  Caesar  Phares  H.  Haywood 


Roy  N.  Spooner 


M.  V.  Eusey 


CONSERVATION  AND  RECLAMATION  COMPANY 


Continued  from  page  281 


John  Rokita 
Benjamin  M.  Ruffner 
Malcolm  M.  Sample 
George  W.  Sain 
Pedro  Sanchez 
Perry  Sanford 
John  W.  R.  Scantlin 
Emas  T.  Schmidt 
Jonas  Schmidt 
Alwin  G.  Schwab 
Luke  Scoma 
John  Seibel 


Susane  Welch 
Olga  Kuhlman 
Mary  E.  Powers 
Clara  Lisch 
Sophia  Baxmyer 
Helen  Loughi 
Ruth  Harris 
Lidia  Weiremeyer 
Mary  Hail 
Annie  E.  Walton 
May  McGee 
Piccola  Settle 
Frances  Thompson 
Mary  McNeil 
Bertha  Calcomb 
Catherine  Graham 
Hanna  Speagidt 
Evelyn  Trotter 
Mary  Phueimu 
Gertrude  R.  Smith 
L.  S.  Schaffer 
Florence  Dilly 
Eugene  LeStrourgenon 


Julius  Sigel 
Homer  J.  Sherman 
Earl  J.  Smith 
Leroy  A.  Smith 
Charlie  Spohn 
Thomas  Spruance 
Herbert  H.  Stautzenberger 
Jesse  R  Steeley 
William  F.  Stoldt 
Walter  Stoltenberg 
Charlie  D.  Tassos 
Everett  T.  Taylor 


William  R.  Tharp 
Charles  E.  Tucker 
Luther  B.  Turner 
Bryan  Votaw 
John  T.  Watkins,  Jr. 
Fred  H  Weber 
Crate  F.  Weese 
Ralph  White 
Charlie  G.  Wilkins 
Roy  L.  Williams 
Manuel  Yznaga 


Mess  Sergeants 

R.  C.  Peterson 
Louis  Pallaye 
Roy  Knowles 
James  F.  McCowen 

Cooks 

Willie  Lock 
Seth  Wood 
Roy  A.  Magnuson 


NURSES— BASE  HOSPITAL 


Continued 


Elsie  H.  Wohlfahrt 
Annie  E.  Huster 
Besta  Pender 
Mary  Whittier 
Marguert  Bready 
Mable  H.  Humphry 
Katherine  Kavanagh 
Mamie  Carter 
Justania  Verhey 
Lennie  J.  Sunthers 
Ella  Winsell 
Gertrude  L.  Frank 
Bertha  Manor 
Martha  Beck 
Iva  Daniel 
Mary  O.  Fisher 
Mary  E.  Fisher 
Charlotte  Douglas 
Nema  McShea 
Wilhelmine  Lute 
Annie  E.  Thorj) 
Dorothy  E.  Hansen 
Marv-  C.  Becknell 


from  page  286 

Frances  Berger 
Verna  A.  Blackley 
Aline  Anderson 
Edith  Foot 
Edna  Woodford 
Louise  Sattelee 
Katherine  Slockum 
Rose  M.  Thomas 
Opal  Goldsbern.' 
Elizabeth  Rees 
Helen  Teubner 
Josephine  Teubner 
Bessie  Curtis 
Johanna  McNolIy 
Ina  M.  Voge 
Virgina  Edwards 
Belva  Hudson 
Alma  Johansen 
Lara  Samuel 
Nobie  Latta 
Jeneva  Ronald 
EUie  L.  Gardiner 
Lillian  M.  Mcjimsey 


Lee  S.  Estes 
Fred  Lehde 
John  Hacay 
OlUe  Mattl'ingly 
C.  C.  Carroll 
Charles  Brinkmeyer 
Stanley  Zawadzki 
Michael  S.  Gotch 
Hubert  R.  Smith 
James  B.  Adams 
Leonard  E.  Haug 


Minnie  M.  Munsen 
Bessie  L.  Harris 
Mary  B.  Clark 
Catherine  Hayes 
Lucy  M.  Groves 
Florence  Manser 
Goldie  A.  Murphv 
Ethel  Bard 
Marion  Garbarine 
Alva  Dinckerson 
Mary  Tennery 
Noma  Longworth 
Mamie  McCarthy 
Maud  Berch 
Loretta  Wrenwick 
Marguerte  McDougal 
Catherine  Reildelback 
Alma  BuUard 
Willie  M.  Marvin 
Verne  Dunlao 


[3111 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


THE  165th  DEPOT  BRIGADE 

Continued  from  page  S30 


they  had  some  little  physical  defect  that  disquahfied  them, 
but  which  could  easily  be  remedied  if  there  had  been  time 
or  way.  But  in  the  throes  of  the  first  organization  these 
men  were  simply  discarded  and  sent  home.  As  they  could 
not,  however,  be  given  a  permanent  discharge  on  such 
grounds,  the  remedy  of  sending  them  back  home  was  only 
temporary,  and  when  the  next  draft  came  in  these  men 
came  back  again  and  the  whole  thing  had  to  be  done  over. 

But  out  of  the  first  inadequacy  the  present  excellent 
system  has  been  developed.  Now  a  man  is  given  the 
opportunity  of  having  his  defects  corrected,  he  is  trained 
in  some  particular  way,  or  if  he  is  illiterate  or  has  never 
learned  the  English  language,  he  is  taught  to  read  and 
write.  The  development  work,  at  Camp  Travis,  of  Group 
No.  6,  which  has  the  capacity  of  approximately  4,500 
men,  is  in  three  battalions. 

In  the  Sixteenth  Battalion  are  the  orthopedic  cases. 
Here  men  who  have  flat  feet  are  given  shoes  that  correct 
the  defect.  Various  exercises  have  been  dev-ised  to 
strengthening  the  weak  muscles.  A  man  walks  up  an 
incline  on  his  tip-toes  and  down  on  his  heels;  he  walks  on 
a  little  trough  contrivance  that  makes  his  feet  turn  in,  and 
in  this  way  and  others  the  trouble  with  his  feet  is  corrected. 

The  Seventh  Battalion  is  devoted  to  special  medical 
cases.  In  the  Eighteenth  Battalion  are  the  illiterates,  the 
post-operatives,  the  aliens,  and  alien  enemies  and  the 
conscientious  objectors. 

The  educational  and  physical  development  work  are  the 
two  phases  that  hold  out  hope  and  encouragement.  The 
story  of  the  man  who  wrote  the  first  letter  to  his  wife 


after  he  had  been  taught  to  read  and  write  in  the  develop- 
ment battalion,  is  matched  by  another  example  of  what 
corrective  medical  work  can  do. 

The  man  came  in  the  first  draft  from  East  Texas,  and 
in  his  physical  examination  it  was  found  that  he  had  a  bad 
leg  and  was  unfit  for  service.  He  was  sent  home  but  not 
discharged.  With  the  next  draft,  back  came  the  man. 
Still  nothing  had  been  done  to  his  leg,  and  still  he  was  unfit 
for  service.  Again  he  was  sent  home,  but  he  still  could 
not  be  discharged.  Third  draft,  back  comes  the  man  to 
Camp  Travis,  bad  leg  worse  and  less  fit  for  service  than 
ever.  This  time,  however,  he  was  sent  to  the  development 
battalion.  There  he  was  turned  over  to  the  physicians 
and  surgeon,  who  made  a  thorough  and  comprehensive 
study  of  his  case.  An  operation  was  decided  upon.  This 
had  now  been  performed  and  the  man  is  recovering  rapidly 
in  the  Base  Hospital.  After  three  weeks  of  convalescence, 
these  operative  cases  are  brought  back  to  the  development 
battalion  where  they  are  given  the  particular  physical 
training  suited  to  their  needs.  The  battalion  has  a  com- 
plete and  well-equipped  gymnasium  where  all  kinds  of 
physical  upbuilding  is  carried  on.  About  2,500  men  work 
in  that  gymnasium  daily.  North  of  the  buildings  is  a 
large  athletic  field,  where  track  meets,  base-ball  games, 
and  various  athletic  events  are  held.  The  regular  military 
drills  are  also  carried  out  by  those  advanced  in  training. 
These  exercises  take  up  practically  the  whole  of  the 
morning.  The  afternoon  is  devoted  largely  to  educational 
work,  and  the  day  is  finished  with  regimental  parade  at 
5.45  three  afternoons  in  the  week. 


OFFICERS— HEADQUARTERS  DE\'ELOPMENT  GROUP— 165th  DEPOT  BRIGADE 

Reading  left  to  right 
Captain  Kirkwood  Otey  Major  Joseph  T.  Roundtree  1st  Lieut.  W.  S.  Hunnicut 

[312] 


2nd  Lieut.  R.  P.  Beird 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


THEY  TRAINED  SINGERS,  PLAYERS  AND  FIGHTERS 

Left  to  right — Front  row:     Bud  Goodwin,  athletic  director;    Johnny  Coulon,  boxing  director 

Top  row:    Wade  Boteler,  dramatic  director;     Carl  Venth,  band  director;     Herbert  Wall,  song  leader 

MAKING  THOSE  IDLE  HOURS  MERRY 

Commission  on   Training  Camp  Activities  Develops  Soldiers  Into 
Singers,  Entertainers  and  Sportsmen 


SOON  after  the  United  States  was  drawn  into  the  world 
war,  and  the  young  men  of  the  nation  began  pouring 
into  the  training  camps  by  the  thousands,  leaving 
behind  them  their  homes,  families,  and  all  the  social  rela- 
tionships to  which  they  were  accustomed,  it  became  ap- 
parent that  some  agency  must  be  instituted  for  the  purpose 
of  supplying  some  sort  of  substitute  for  these  things.  Ac- 
cordingly Secretary  Baker  appointed  the  War  Department 
Commission  on  Training  Camp  Activities,  which  was 
charged  with  the  responsibility  of  cultivating  and  conserv- 
ing the  manhood  and  man  power  of  America's  fighting 
forces.  This  work  was  accomplished  by  means  of  a  com- 
prehensive program  of  recreational  and  educational  activi- 
ties. Specialists  were  sent  into  all  the  camps  to  supervise 
the  training  of  the  men  in  mass  singing,  athletics,  bo.xing 
and  hand-to-hand  fighting,  dramatic  entertainment,  and 
many  other  subjects. 

Mass  singing  has  been  recognized  as  one  of  the  strongest 
factors  in  morale  upbuilding.  It  smooths  out  the  dis- 
agreeable, trying  difficulties  connected  with  the  training 
grind,  and  inspires  the  men  in  time  of  danger.  General 
Pershing  once  cabled:  "Send  me  more  singing  regiments," 
and  it  has  been  said  many  times  that  the  best  singing  unit 
is  generally  the  best  drilling  unit.  The  song  leader  con- 
ducts mass  singing,  and  trains  assistant  leaders  for  each 
military  unit.  Mr.  Herbert  Wall,  the  commission  song 
leader  for  Camp  Travis,  has  done  splendid  work  in  de- 
veloping the  singing  spirit  of  the  men,  and  has  been  instru- 
mental in  uniting  camp  and  community  life  by  carrying 
on  regular  sings  in  San  Antonio  as  well  as  in  the  camp. 


As  a  result  of  the  commission  organization,  athletics  in 
the  army  supplements  military  training,  besides  serving 
as  recreation.  Mr.  Budd  Goodwin,  camp  athletic  director, 
was  in  charge  of  this  work  at  Camp  Travis.  Mr.  Goodwin 
is  famous  as  an  athlete,  and  his  efforts  in  promoting  base- 
ball, football,  track  competitions,  and  swimming,  brought 
the  athletic  standards  of  the  camp  up  to  a  high 
mark. 

Instruction  in  boxing  and  hand-to-hand  fighting  in 
Camp  Travis  was  organized  by  Mr.  Johnny  Coulon, 
former  bantam-weight  champion  of  the  world,  in  co- 
operation with  Mr.  Goodwin.  The  boxing  develops  quali- 
ties fundamental  for  success  in  bayonet  fighting,  and  the 
hand-to-hand  fighting  prepares  the  soldier  for  the  emer- 
gency of  becoming  disarmed  in  combat.  Entirely  apart 
from  the  gain  of  technical  proficiency,  the  men  so  trained 
acquire  a  large  amount  of  confidence. 

The  work  of  the  Department  of  Dramatic  Activities  of 
the  commission  consists  in  developing  the  self-entertaining 
possibilities  of  the  men  along  theatrical  lines.  The 
dramatic  director  promoted  and  assisted  in  the  organization 
of  entertainment  units  within  the  military  units,  and 
stood  ready  to  give  instruction  along  dramatic  lines  to 
soldiers  with  talent.  In  Camp  Travis  this  work  has  been 
carried  on  by  Mr.  Wade  Boteler,  stage-director  and 
dramatic  educator,  formerly  associated  with  the  American 
Academy  of  Dramatic  Arts,  New  York  City.  Mr.  Carl 
Venth,  camp  band  master,  worked  in  conjunction  with  the 
Camp  Singing  Director,  in  arranging  regular  "sings"  and 
special  events,  both  indoor  and  out. 


[313] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


OFFICERS— 18th  TRAIN  HEADQUARTERS  AND  MILITARY  POLICE 

Left  to  right 

Major  DeForrest  W.  Morton  Captain  John  M.  Hite  Major  Herbert  R.  Dean  Major  E.  L.  Goar 

Captain  Chas.  B.  Owens  Chaplajn  Peter  M.  Curry  Lieut.  Jas.  Mclver 


[314: 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


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3151 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


LIBEItTV  THEATRE 


The  "Liberty  Theatre,"  originally  known  as  the  Ma- 
jestic Camp  Theatre,  was  erected  by  the  Interstate 
Amusement  Company,  at  a  cost  of  approximately  $47,- 
000.00.  With  a  matinee  on  January  6,  1918,  the  theatre 
was  opened,  showing  high-class  vaudeville.  On  July  29, 
1918,  the  building  and  all  equipment  was  purchased  by 
the  commission  on  Training  Camp  Activities,  and  the 
name  changed  to  Liberty  Theatre.  Seating  capacity  of 
the  building  is  1963,  and  it  was  taxed  many  times,  to 


accommodate  the  enthusiastic  audiences.  The  playhouse 
was  a  success  from  the  very  beginning,  due  to  the  fact 
that  the  management  produced  nothing  but  the  best  and 
cleanest  of  amusements.  The  variety  of  attractions  in- 
cluded vaudeville,  musical  comedy,  stock,  feature  pictures 
of  the  highest  order,  and  various  large  road  attractions.  An 
important  factor  in  making  this  and  other  similar  theatres 
a  success,  was  "Smileage."  These  coupons  furnished 
thousands  of  soldiers  with  good,  wholesome  entertainment. 


QUARTERMASTER  CORPS  DETACHMENT 
Continued  from  page  S80 


Corporals — Continued 
Benjamin  F.  Owens 
Maurice  Dalkowitz 
Max  Finkel 
Matthias  D.  Miller 
Erich  P.  Haye 
Emil  Labroche 
William  B.  Phelps 
Joseph  Rubin 
Andrew  Walraven 
WiUiam  SchoU 
Charles  W.  Cleveland 
Charles  F.  Lovell 
.\bel  J.  Boerema 
Elmer  G.  Barker 
George  E.  Garner 
Alfred  L.  Cameron 
Cari  E.  Wright 
Guy  S.  Nailling 
Herbert  Vogelpohl 
Max  S.  Riglander 
Edwin  F.  Falvey 

Wagoners 
James  Cobb 
Cari  D.  Merritt 
Ferdinand  R.  Pursch 

Cooks 
.\rchie  M.  Closson 
Gurtie  O'Neal  Trout 
Claud  Hunt 

Privates — First  Class 
Axel  V.  .\nderson 
Roman  Beaver 
Richard  W.  CahiU 


Jonathan  Corum 
John  H.  Dahlstrom 
Ralph  J.  Deane 
Herman  Doebbler 
Frank  Heron 
Elgin  Klaemer 
Joe  Prda 
Robert  T.  PuUen 
-Archie  Real 
Fritz  W.  Stromeyer 
August  J.  Weilbacher 
Conrad  W.  Wilke 

Privates 
Tony  .-^ngonia 
Ernest  Y.  Ayers 
Willie  Baron 
Leon  Batchelor 
Samuel  .\.  Beane 
Carl  S.  Beaver 
Herman  T.  Bridges 
Al\-in  L.  Brodt 
Ed.  C.  Burch 
Willie  M.  Burnett 
Leon  Burras 
Bruce  E.  Cannoy 
Mills  A.  CoUard 
Leiand  S.  Cook 
Halbert  G.  Cooper 
Frank  W.  Cox 
Mansel  F.  Crandal 
Field  F.  Cunningham 
Walter  M.  Davis 
Harry  R.  Deringer 
Henrj-  C.  Doherty 
Grover  C.  Durham 
WiU  Eisfeld 


Raymond  W.  EUiston 
OUver  L.  Estes 
Gerald  H.  Ferguson 
Weldon  E.  Forester 
John  Franke 
August  E.  Gerlach 
Yandell  G.  GUbert 
Claude  R.  Goodwin 
Robert  W.  Grant 
Aubrey  B.  Hamilton 
Walter  Hanson 
WiUiam  W.  Harper 
William  AL  Havens 
Murray  B.  Herring 
Henn,-  J.  Hochstetter 
Clarence  T.  Hubble 
Ralph  O.  Hungerford 
George  S.  Hutto 
John  C.  Hyden 
William  .'\.  Jackson 
Edward  Krems 
Charley  Leschikar 
Isadore  J.  Levinson 
Lewis  J.  Lewis  Jr. 
Walter  B.  Lipscomb 
Milton  Littell 
Jke  Lo  wen  thai 
Joe  F.  Manka 
George  S.  Mansell 
John  H.  Manuel 
John  R.  Maurer 
George  E.  Moore 
Emil  F.  Muennink 
Charles  C.  McAnally 
James  F.  McCormick 
Floyd  D.  McCoy 
Waiter  E.  McGlumphy 


Victor  W.  Northen 

George  Oldham 

Henry  L.  Page 

Eugene  J.  Parton 

Charles  S.  Perry 

Art  E.  Pettitt 

John  J.  Phelan 

Tony  Plagens 

Levi  G.  Pondrom 

Stewart  F.  Porter 

Will  J.  Psencik 

Gordon  F.  Race 

Alvin  Rahe 

Clarence  Saxon 

Hubbard  M.  Schulenberger 

Oscar  Semar 

Herbert  M.  Shelton 

Herbert  G.  Shuddemagen 

Willard  B.  Skelton 

Max  F.  Steck 

Clifford  O.  Stephens 

Philip  E.  Tanis 

Adolph  Tehas 

Walter  L.  Tompkins 

."Mlie  W.  Trumbo 

Robert  M.  Turner 

Joseph  V.  Ulrich 

Otto  J.  Weber 

Samuel  A.  West 

Robert  H.  Will 

Robert  C.  WiUiams 

Milton  Williamson 

Morris  Wolfson 

Aaron  E.  Wood 

William  O.  Wood 

Edward  E.  Wulf 

Thomas  J.  Young 


[316] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


\ 


Privates — Continued 
Michael  P.  Leahy 
Manuel  Leal 
Malcolm  A.  Lee 
Charles  Letukes 
Fritz  E.  Levermann 
Bernard  Lewis 
Frederic  A.  Lewis 
Thomas  L.  Limmer 
John  E.  Little 
Ernest  H.  Loveless 
James  M.  Loyless 
Silas  M.  Luck 
William  C.  Lynch 
Allen  F.  McClanahan 
Merton  J.  MacLean 
Carl  McDaniel 
William  McDavid 
William  D.  McGee 
Herbert  McHughcs 
Isaac  E.  McKelvey 
Joseph  D.  McNutt 
George  H.  McWhorter 
Dockie  D.  Manuel 
Granville  F.  Maples 
Harry  M alley 
William  Marks 
Charlie  E.  Martin 
Ezra  S.  Martin 
William  J.  Martin 
Ira  D.  Masters 
Clarence  R.  Matter 
John  S.  Matthews 
George  B.  May6eld 
Sam  A.  Mazurek 
William  J.  Meckel 
Emeryn  C.  Meroney 
Lewis  Meyers 
George  F.  Miller 
Solomon  Mitchell 
John  B.  Montgomery 


Vernon  W.  Montgomery 
Jake  Moore 
Danzil  M.  Morehouse 
John  M.  Moreland 
Ernest  D.  Morris 
Sam  Morris 
Cecil  B.  Morrow 
Fred  A.  Moser 
William  Murphy 
Mack  Nettleship 
Elon  Nulk 
William  B.  Nutz 
Peter  R.  Oaks 
Louis  Oden 
Vernal  D.  Orr 
O.  B.  Duard  Osteen 
Andrew  M.  Owens 
Charles  J.  Pack 
Robert  F.  Page 
Vincent  Pala 
Gus  Palmer 
James  H.  Palmer 
Seab  B.  Passmore 
Huling  H.  Parker 
Robert  H.  Parker 
John  A.  Page 
Christian  E.  Paxson 
Oscar  Payne 
Roy  Lee  Pearson 
Edward  Pennison 
John  E.  Perrion 
William  M.  Peterson 
Jesse  E.  Pcttv 
Brooxy  B,  Plielph 
Antonio  PigHacampo 
Elw>"n  E.  Plew 
Edward  L.  Price 
William  H.  Puett 
Rudolph  Purgason 
William  G.  Quick 
George  T.  Ralph 


UTILITIES  DETACHMENT 
Continued  from  page  $78 

Robert  L.  Randolph 
Albert  S.  Ray 
Edward  C.  Rayes 
John  H.  Read 
Robert  Reagan 
Charles  W.  Reed 
James  C.  Reed 
Gladney  H.  Riddle 
Ira  H.  Riddle 
Harry  Riggs 
Louis  P.  Rilling 
Clarence  A.  Roberts 
Clay  H.  Roberts 
Max  P.  Rochow 
Sullivan  Rock 
Virginius  V.  Rodrigues 
Clyde  R.  Rowan 
Claude  W.  Ruffner 
Harry  V.  Rumbelow 
Rafael  Salinas 
William  J.  Salter 
Joseph  A.  Samp 
Jose  Sanchez 
Tony  Santino 
Elmer  Eli  Shaw 
Walter  W.  Schmidt 
John  W.  Scott 
Wood  F.  Scott 
Harvey  E.  Screws 
Albert  D.  Seay 
Henry  Sederholm 
Giuseppe  Seferino 
James  F.  Sheats 
Homer  E.  Shelton 
Harvie  P.  Shockley 
Hart  Shoemaker 
Hullette  R.  Short 
Pelligrino  Simi 
Billy  Sisson 
Edgar  Skaggs 
Charlie  Smith 


Cloyd  D.  Smith 
Custer  Smith 
George  A.  Smith 
Pink  Smith 
Sim  Smith 
William  T.  Smith 
Frank  H.  Snyder 
William  G.  Sparks 
Gerald  F.  Speights 
Charles  F.  Sodolak 
Walter  L.  Stegall 
Hugh  Stevens 
Charlie  W.  Stewart 
Charley  L.  Stone 
John  D.  Stoneham 
John  T.  Strohley 
Gustave  A.  Stuebner,  Jr. 
Joseph  A.  Stumpf 
Jay  D.  Sudderth 
Harry  A.  Sullivan 
Neil  Sullivan 
Thurbert  P.  Sweeden 
George  R.  Swetnam 
George  C.  Swillev 
Rufus  M.  Teakeil 
Otto  E.  Tegeler 
Andrew  J.  Terry 
Jim  Theodorian 
Lynch  A.  Thomas 
Louis  B.  Thomason 
Chas.  P.  Thompson 
Edgar  E.  Thompson 
Andrew  J.  Thornell 
Alfred  C.  Thorsfeldt 
Henry  G.  Thurman 
Willie  E.  Ticmann 
Early  J.  Tierce 
Arthur  W.  Tierney 
Wyley  E.  Timmons 
Carl  Titsworth 
David  O.  Tramp 


Oscar  Trapolino 
Leon  G.  Traweek 
George  C.  Tucker 
Lee  W.  Turner 
William  H.  Turner 
William  N.  Twaddle 
Ira  D.  Ussery 
Edward  R.  Vaught 
Lavert  Veach 
Earl  H.  Voss 
Samuel  Walker 
Charles  E.  Wallace 
August  J.  Wallisch 
Ezra  D.  Ward 
Goebel  Washington 
Lee  Watson 
Robert  W.  Watters 
Theodore  J.  Weaver 
Edward  A.  Wehmeyer 
Rudolph  Wehring 
Leonard  Welstead 
Henry  Wertz 
Chauncey  A.  West 
Joseph  Wetzel 
Starlcy  B.  Whisenhunt 
Charles  C.  Whitney 
Lawrence  J.  Wilkes 
Allen  W.  Williams 
Henry  J.  Williams 
Wilbume  O.  Williams 
Evert  W.  Wilson 
Preston  G.  Wilson 
Ivy  L.  Woodward 
George  Wright 
John  L.  Wright 
Craig  Yates 
Noble  Vates 
Juan  Ybarra 
Frank  L.  Voder 
James  L.  York 
Roy  Young 


DETACHMENT  MEDICAL  DEPARTMENT— BASE  HOSPITAL 

Continued  from  page  2S5 


Solon  E.  Rose 
Phillips  Rosenstein 
LeRoy  B.  Rudder 
Gus.  Rumble 
Juan  Sanchez 
Sherman  F.  Sander 
Hilmer  Schaetter 
Henry  L.  Schmidt 
Valierie  Schneider 
Frederick  Schoellmann 
William  W.  Scott 
Fred  W.  Schultz 
Walter  W.  Shewmake 


John  Sebastian 
Wiley  E.  Seward 
Joseph  A.  Sewcll 
Edward  J.  Shearer 
William  H.  Simmons 
Howard  Sims 
Oscar  N.  Smelser 
David  P.  Smiley 
Arthur  W.  Smith 
Clifton  H.  Smith 
Walter  V.  Smith 
Olive  W.  Sormrude 
Arthur  L.  Ostrum 


Robert  C.  Stephens 
William  G.  Strunce 
Joe  E.  Stuart 
Benjamin  Suggs 
Claude  F.  Suggs 
Edward  W.  Taylor 
Frank  M.  Taylor 
Jeff  S.  Thigpin 
William  G.  Thomas 
William  D.  Thomason 
Willie  S.  Thomason 
Oliver  C.  Towery 
Wyatt  B.  Townsend 


Hollis  E.  Trimm 
Claud  Tucker 
Curtis  C.  Tucker 
William  A.  Tyson 
Fred  W.  Ulrich 
Fritz  B.  Underwood 
George  S.  Vandusen 
Gardie  R.  Wade 
John  E.  Wade 
Marks  A.  Waldrop 
Albert  Warner 
Fred  T.  Weir 
George  A.  Weems 


George  F.  Westerburg 
John  White 
John  White 
Charles  R.  Williams 
I^ouis  A.  Willis 
Loyd  F.  Wilson 
William  G.  Wilson 
Alexander  Wofford 
Charlton  B.  Wood 
Erastus  L.  Wright 
Robert  L.  Wright 
Frank  Zimmerman,  Jr. 


CAMP  HEADQUARTERS  DETACHMENT 
Continued  from  page  2S8 


Privates  First  Class — Con. 
Jot  A.  Redburn 
Emil  A.  Riedel 
Clarence  C.  Roof 
Leonard  H.  Slawson 
Clarence  E.  Tompkins 
Proctor  K.  Wathen 
George  E.  Williams 
Walter  George  Wolfraum 
Francis  N.  McCord 

Privates 
Sydney  E.  Adkisson 
Benjamin  F.  Baker 
Herbert  G.  Baker 
James  J.  Bonner 
Bernard  C.  Bartzen 
Willie  Baron 
Frank  O.  Bay 
Herman  E.  Becker 
Joe  E.  Belitz 


Charles  B.  Berry 
Allen  W.  Boyd 
Henrj'  R.  Cook 
John  D.  Conner 
Gus  L.  Corey 
Roy  A.  Cooper 
James  A.  Chenoweth 
Preston  B.  Cox 
Alois  J.  Dostalik 
Sam  M.  Dobie 
Samuel  B.  Davis 
Hardv  E.  Dillard 
John  T.  Drumble 
James  E.  Durio 
Robert  W.  Eckhardt 
Stephen  F.  EUedge 
Odie  L.  EUerbee 
Edward  T.  Elmendorf 
Abe  Fox 

Joshua  C.  Fowler 
Aubrey  B.  Bathings 


Paul  C.  GUI 
William  A.  Glascow 
Edwin  Goodwin 
James  E.  Gurlev 
William  B.  Goo'dlow 
Nathan  Goldberg 
John  B.  Herring 
James  Hopson 
Jesse  E.  Huey 
Frank  E.  Hoover 
Emil  HoUien 
Joseph  W.  Hatachell 
Samuel  F.  Holmes 
Edward  W.  Holverson 
Herman  O.  Harrison 
Gustav  Hein 
Walter  P.  Jones 
Thaddeus  E.  Johson 
Grover  C.  Johncon 
Edmond  J.  Jares 
Daniel  Kennedv 


Arthur  J.  Klein 
Euel  J.  Kirkpatrick 
John  King 
Lee  M.  Kenyon 
Homer  R.  Kelly 
Girard  Loomis 
Newton  Lassiter 
Chassie  E.  Ligon 
Bernard  Lara 
Chester  I.  Longside 
Asa  L.  Lewis 
Elmer  E.  Latham 
James  H.  Langston 
Joseph  G.  Lafontaine 
Laure  McFarland 
William  C.  McLaurine 
Irwin  R.  May 
Winfree  Meachum 
Emil  J.  Mills 
Leland  M.  Morton 
Emil  J.  Marquardsen 


Richard  Madden 
Jesse  H.  Neuman 
Edwin  Niggle 
Story  Pottinger 
Frederick  W.  Panciera 
Elmore  J.  Rack 
Kenney  L.  Riggs 
Maxie  C.  Royals 
Frank  H.  Reichert 
Arthur  W.  Shillings 
Willie  Sellers 
E.  Saley 

Arthur  G.  Schroeder 
Robert  E.  Taylor 
Albert  P.  Talbert 
Albert  L.  Taylor 
Cleve  Thorn 
Harvey  B.  Varnum 
Neil  B.  Wyllie 
Kolman  Weinberger 
Lennie  H.  Wilkinson 


[317] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


^ 


MAJOR  E.  B.  JOHNS 
Chairman  Committee  on  Publication 


(318! 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


CAPTAIN  PARKHURST  L.  WHITNEY,  INF.  U.  S.  A. 
Editor-in-Chief 


[319] 


CAMP     TRAVIS     AND     THE     WORLD     WAR 


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3201 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


THE  STAFF— "CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  ITS  PART  IN  THE  WORLD  WAR" 

MAJOR  E.  B.  JOHNS 

Chairman  Committee  on  Publication 

Editorial  Staff 

CAPT.  PARKHURST  L.  WHITNEY 

Editor-in-Chief 

1st  LIEUT.  PHILLIP  HERRIN 
Assodate  Editor 


MAJOR  W.  B.  TUTTLE 
Associate  Editor 

MAJOR  FELIX  KERRICK 

Associate  Editor 


E.  L.  HAWES 

Y.  M.  C.  A. 
Associate  Editor 


ERNEST  L.  PRIEST 

Editor  "Trench  and  Camp" 
Associate  Editor 

J.  J.  O'CONNELL 

Secretary  Knights  oj  Columbus 
Associate  Editor 


Advertising 

SERGT.  BERNARD  R.  O'CONNOR      PRIVATE  J.  S.  MacHENRY     PRIVATE  N.  A.  CANTY 

Circulation 

2nd  LIEUT.  B.  V.  BRADY       SERGT.  REY  E.  CHATFIELD      SERGT.  HENRY  L.  GOSSMAN 
SERGT.  A.  G.  WOODS  SERGT.  LEWIS  T.  PRICE 

Art 

CHAPLAIN  RAY  F.  CAMP  SERGT.  J.  B.  OHLSON  CORP.  SCHAFFER 

PRIVATE  S.  L.  BRANNON 


J  Last  fVord 

^\NE  thinks  of  the  making  of  a  book  as  a  leisurely  process,  beginning  at  some  remote  period 
yj  in  the  brain  of  its  author,  thence  progressing  by  slow  stages  through  the  various  phases  of 
writing,  editing,  printing  and  bin  it ng,  finally  to  reach  the  book  stands  and  library  shelves 
of  the  book  seller  and  the  reader.  Undoubtedly  some  books  are  so  made.  This  book  was  not. 
Nor  did  the  sta_ff  have  any  guide  to  smooth  the  way  of  compilation.  Magazine  writers  have  added 
much  to  the  horrors  of  war  with  their  stories  of  life  in  the  army,  but  "Camp  Travis  and  Its  Part 
in  the  World  War"  is  the  first  complete  history  of  a  great  cantonment.  This  is  all  by  way  of  an 
explanation  for  slight  errors,  for  it  is  inconceivable  that  in  the  rush  to  press  some  errors  have  not 
crept  in  and  staid  in.  In  compiling  the  book  the  staff  has  received  invaluable  assistance  from 
many  persons;  in  fact,  without  the  co-operation  of  many  minds  a  work  of  such  size  could  not 
have  been  completed.  The  picture  of  Newton  D.  Baker,  Secretary  of  War,  which  appears  in  the 
fore  part  of  the  book  is  from  a  copyright  photograph  by  Underwood  &•  Underwood,  New  York. 
The  pictures  of  General  Peyton  C.  March  and  General  John  J.  Pershing  are  from  copyright 
photographs  by  Clinedinst,  Washington,  D.  C. 


[321] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


LAST  REVIEW  OF 


^utograpf)£i 


[322] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


THE  CACTUS  DIVISION 


^utograpi)s( 


;323] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


303rd  CAVALRY 


glutograptig 


[324; 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


PARENT  OF  THE  52nd  AND  53rd  FIELD  ARTILLERY 


^utograpfjsi 


[325] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


^i^saispr 


**  ■  Jt1fi.^''»i»l  ■  ■— 


Reminiscence 

Oft  on  the  eve  of  lonely  nights, 
When  the  peaceful  western  world's  aglow 
And  Heaven  sinks  to  candle  lights, 
You'll  hear  a  call  so  soft  and  low  ; 
You'll  live  the  days  that  are  no  more. 
And  know  'twas  then  you  did  your  best. 
You'll  miss  the  throb  of  tramping  feet, 
The  heavy  pack  and  rifle  sling. 
When  labor  never  seemed  so  sweet, 
Knowing  not  what  days  would  bring. 

You'll  wish  that  you  were  back  again. 
Back  with  the  rank  and  file  of  old, 
Sharing  life  with  lads  now  slain. 
To  hear  anew  the  tales  they  told. 
But  time  doth  drift  you  on  and  on, 
Leaving  memory  in  its  wake. 
The  trail  that  leads  to  days  bygone. 
The  trail  that  you  shall  never  take. 

— Lieut.  W.  E.  Hicks 


[326] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


An  Honor  List 


THE  BUSINESS  ANNOUNCEMENTS 
which  follow  should  be  of  particular 
interest  to  the  men  who  trained  at  Camp 
Travis,  and  of  equal  interest  to  their  relatives 
and    friends. 

The  men  and  firms  whose  names  are  mentioned 
are  American  men  and  American  firms. 
Through  fair  dealing  to  men  in  the  Service 
they  contributed  to  the  successful  prosecution 
of  the  war,  and  the  Committee  on  Publication 
is  glad  to  accord  them  a  place  in  the  history  of 
the  cantonment. 

A  study  of  these  announcements  will  partic- 
ularly interest  the  many  soldiers  who  have 
painful  memories  of  the  war's  eflFect  upon  the 
prices  of  merchandise. 

There  are  no  profiteers  in  this  list. 


[327 


CAMP    TRAVIS    AND    THE    WORLD    WAR 


"EFFICIENCY" 

Through  our   Efficient   Service 
and  Undisputable  Merchandise 

"QUALITY" 

have  we  been  able  to  enjoy  the 
Liberal    Patronage   of   the 

Camp  Canteens  of   Camp   Travis 

and    others    throughout    the 
United  States 


Jobbers  of  Army  Supplies 
and  Furnishing  Goods 

for  the  Soldier  and  Civilian 


"PLAZA  BRAND"  FOR  "QUALITY" 
MANUFACTURERS  OF 
SIDE -LACE    LEGGINS 

Chas.  Davis  Company 


101  S.  FLORES  ST. 


PHONE  CRO.  2835 


Stop,    Look, 
Listen ! 

I  am  the  man  who  made 

your  Company   Picture. 

Also  various   other   scenes 

of  interest. 

Copies  may  be  obtained  by 
mailing  $1.2d  to 

C.  A.  STEAD 

306  KAMPMANN  BLDG. 
SAN  ANTONIO,  TEXAS 

J.  T.  Hamner 

A 


'^ 


San  Antonio,  Texas 


Crispi's  Fresh  Home 
Made  Candies 

Five-cent  packages  a  specialty 

THE  SOLDIERS'  DELIGHT 

Manufactured  by  the 

D.  A.  CRISPI  MANUFACTURING  COMPANY 
SAN  ANTONIO,  TEXAS 


SNAPPY  PICTURES 


SNAPPY  SERVICE 


M.  F.  Weaver  Photo  Service 

Photographer  for 

History  of  Camp  Travis 

Panoramas  of 

Camps,  Regiments,  Companies,  Conventions  and  Views 

Bathing  Girl  Panoramas 

DupHcaU  prints  securely  wrapped  and  mailed  ort  receipt  of  $1 J85 


15  Appman  Building 
Phone.  Crockett  1227 


121   W.  HOUSTON  STREET 
SAN  ANTONIO,  TEXAS 


n 

I 

n 
). 

1      j^aiiiLiisiMa.,..      1 

The 

V^olff  &  Marx  Cc 

San  Antonio's  Best 
Department  Store 

3281 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


JUNIOR   PLATTSBURG 


Lake  Champlain, 


C7= 


•^ 


,  JDNIOK  PLATTSBURG 


'-■■vi-"i.~-:i^ks.-i^' 


?l 


New  York  .*. 


C 


=o 


AERIAL  RECONNAISSANCE  AND  GROUND  SCHOOL  OF 

AVIATION     '.•     AUTOMOBILE  MECHANICS 

AND  OTHER  TECHNICAL  COURSES 

Cavalry,  Polo,  E>quitatIon,  Artillery, 
Infantry,  Navigation. 

ACADEMIC   INSTRUCTION  FOR  ENTRANCE  OR  RETURN  TO  COLLEGE. 
SUPERVISED  RECREATION.        ALL  SUMMER  SPORTS. 


POST-WAR  TRAINING  FOR  YOUNG  MEN  OF  14  to  21  YEARS- 
ACADEMIC.  TECHNICAL,  MILITARY  AND  NAVAL— WITH 
COMPLETE  EQUIPMENT  OWNED  BY  CAMP— UNDER  EXPERI- 
ENCED  LICENSED  AVIATORS.  ARMY  AND  NAVY  OFFICERS 
(retired)  AND  UNIVERSITY  PROFESSORS  AND  INSTRUCTORS. 


Third  Encampment,  Eight  Weeks 

BEGINNING  JULY  1,  1919 

THIRD    YEAR    OF    A    PERMANENT     INSTITUTION. 

MAINTENANCE  AND  TRAINING,   INCLUDING  CHOICE  OF  A 

TECHNICAL  COURSE— FULL  TERM.  $300. 

For    Catalogue    and   Information,    address    Intelligence    Officer, 

JUNIOR  PLATTSBURG,    9  East  43th  St.,  New  York 


[  329  1 


CAMP     TRAVIS     AND     I'  II  IC     WORLD     WAR 


ORGANIZED    1915 


The  STATE  NATIONAL  BANK 

(U.  S.  GOVERNMENT  DEPOSITORY) 

of  SAN  ANTONIO,  TEXAS 


CAPITAL  STOCK  3500,000.00 


SURPLUS  (Earned)  3100,000.00 


THE    HISTORY    OF 
CAMP     TRAVIS 

AND  THE  HISTORY  OF 


'7he  Drink  that  Satisfies" 

Are  so  closely  interwoven  that  one  is  not  com- 
plete without  the  other. 

LA  PERL.\  is  the  favorite  beverage  of  all 
officers  and  enlisted  men  stationed  at  Camp 
Travis.     It  is  "the  Drink  that  satisfies." 

Drink  LA  PERLA  when  you  are  thirsty.  It 
has  the  snap,  the  sparkle  and  the  old-time  deli- 
cious flavor  of  hops,  that  reaches  the  spot  and 
quenches  the  thirst. 

BREWKD  AND  BOITLED  BY 

ALAMO  INDUSTRIES 

ckScketi-  57!.5  SAN  ANTONIO,  TEXAS 


THE  POPULAR 

MILD    HAVANA 

CIGAR 


10c.  AND  UP 


^fi  3335  mfs 


WHOLiSALE 
MANUFACT 


STAPLE  AND  FANCY  CANDIES 


San  Antonio,  Texas 


FACTORY  AND  OrFICE      \\ 
;29  b.  I'hircs  St. 

Telephones: 
Bell,  Crockett  7580 

Long  Distance  Service 


FINE   CHOCOLATES   AND 
FANCY  PACKAGE  GOODS 


[330] 


CAMP     TRAVIS     AND     T  II  K     WORLD     WAR 


/^UR  part  in  the  life 
^^  of  CAMP  TRAVIS 

consisted    in    furnishing 
the  best  quahty  of  milk, 
ice  cream  and  service. 

Nothing  could  please  us 
more   than  to  have  this 
opportunity    of    placing 
a    record    of   our    per- 
formance   before    the 
men  whom  we  served. 

RIEGLER 

ICE  CREAM 
COMPANY 

SAN   ANTONIO,    TEXAS 

331 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


THE  SOLDIER'S  NEWSPAPER 


A  NEWSPAPER  OF  DISTINCTION 


The 


SAN  ANTONIO  LIGHT 

Prints  news  while  it  is  news,  carries 

the  full  Associated  Press  news  report, 

and  gives  its  readers  a  birds-eye  view 

of  the  world  by  daylight 


SAN  ANTONIO'S  LEADING 
NEWSPAPER 


THE  NEWSPAPER  OF  THE 
SOUTHWEST  t 


PICTURES     OF 

"The 
Human  Cactus" 

shown  on  Page  72  of  this  book 
can   be    purchased    from   the 

Cactus  Publishing  Company 

299  Broadway  .  .  New  York 


Single  Copy,  $1.00.       Twelve  for  $10.00. 


"Literally  ami  pictoriaUy  presents  the  emblem  of  iheir  Hiv-ision  in  the 
U\'ing  form,  with  its  bristling  characteristics." — New  York  Times. 

■The  remarkable  picture  of  the  Cactus  Division.*'— .Vo/wno/Cw^ra^AiV 
Magazine. 


The 
McKenzie  Construction  Co. 


(I5cncral  Contractorjs 


605  BEDELL  BUILDING  SAN  ANTONIO,  TEXAS 


G. 

A. 

DUERLER  MFG. 

pioneer  Confectioners 
^tatc  of  CcxasJ 

CO. 

SAN  ANTONIO 

TEXAS 

HITT 

CIGAR  CO. 

Distributors  for 

Optimo 

San  Martin  Leon 

New  Bachelor 

Cigars 

SAN  ANTONIO 
TEXAS 


Use  Our 

HAND  H 
BLEND  COFFEE 

for  perfect  satisfaction. 
It  is  time  tried  and 
always  found  to  be  the 
same  delightful,  satisfy- 
ing drink.  Not  the 
most  expensive,  but  al- 
ways the  best,  and  always 
Pure  Coffee.  No 
Substitutes. 

HOFFMANN-  HAYM AN 

COFFEE  CO. 

San  Antonio,  Tex. 


[332] 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


A  Conscience  and  a  Backbone 

Are    the    distinguished    characteristics    of    the 

San  Antonio  Evening  News 

The  paper  that  knows  but  one  interest,  that  of  the  people. 
It's  a  joyously  alive,  happily  progressive,  newsily  com- 
plete,  well-edited,  fearless-in-truth-telling,  honest-with- 
you-and-with-itself  newspaper. 

Delivered  to  the  home  for  10  cents  a  week 
2  CENTS  A  COPY 

TEE  EVENING  NEWS  STANDS  FOR 

The  best  interest  of  its  community,  state,  nation.  The 
truth,  and  all  the  truth.  Independent  in  politics,  it  is 
free  to  tell  the  truth  at  all  times.  Progressiveness — • 
upbuilding.    Justice  and  Righting  of  Wrong. 

AND— THE  EVENING  NEWS 

Is  the  first  truly  representative  Afternoon  Newspaper 
San  Antonio  has  ever  had.  It  covers  the  local  news 
fully,  brilliantly.  Its  world  news  is  from  the  largest, 
best,  most  far-reaching  news-gathering  agencies.  The 
EVENING  NEWS  is  first  in  local,  first  in  State,  and 
first  in  the  news  of  the  wide,  wide  world. 


SAN  ANTONIO   EXPRESS 

The  Only  Morning  Newspaper   in    this   Big  Section  of  the  Country 

The  EXPRESS  carries  the  full  Associated  Press  and 
Universal  Service  reports.  In  addition,  it  has  staff  cor- 
respondents and  representatives  in  all  the  large  cities 
and  Te.xas  is  completely  covered  for  the  EXPRESS  by 
more   than   300   correspondents    and    its   leased   wires. 

The  prestige  of  the  EXPRESS  is    the  result  of  more 

than  half  a  century  of  honest,  devoted  service  to  the 

people  of  San  Antonio  and  Texas. 


THE  SEMI-WEEKLY  FARM  EXPRESS 

Issued  every  Tuesday  and  Friday,  the  Paper  that  is 
the  standby  of  the    rural   sections   of  the  Southwest. 


These  Three  Publications,  enjoying  that  confidence  of  reader  and  advertiser  that  is  won  by 

value   and   honesty,  are   published   by 

THE  EXPRESS  PUBLISHING  COMPANY 

San  Antonio,  Texas. 


333 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


f334j 


CAMP    TRAVIS    AND    THE    WORLD    WAR 


■■^ 


-^^ 


Delicious  cin<i  Refreshing 


San  Antonio 
Coca-Cola 
Bottling 
Co. 

San  Antonio, 
Texas 


335  i 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


PIONEERS 


ESTABLISHED  1885 


Kline's 

Creamery  Dairy 
Company 


EIGHTH  AND  AUSTIN  STS. 


SAN  ANTONIO,  TEXAS 


Velvet  Ice  Cream 

Golden  Rod  Butter 

Milk  and  Cream  for  Infants  and 

Invalids  a  Specialty  of  Ours 
Strawberry  and  Chocolate  Milk 
Butter  Milk  and  Cottage  Cheese 


QUALITY    AND     SANITATION    OUR    HOBBY 

CAPACITY  TO   FURNISH  ALL  ARMY  CAMPS 

AND  SAN  ANTONIO 


All  Orders  Given  Prompt  Attention 


Service  Our  Slogan 


33G 


CAMP  TRAVIS  AND  THE  WORLD  WAR 


"BETTER  m^  HAll^'^fC  miKT  if 


WHC 


mm 


U.  S.-U.  S.  N-  U.  S.  A. 
R.  O.  T.  C.  -  U.  S.  M.  C. 

JUST  INITIALS,  LETTERS,  TYPE  -  BUT  THEY  MEAN  A  LOT 


WHC 


ARE  OURS,  AND  THEY  MEAN  GOOD  PRINTING 

Wynkoop  Hallenbeck  Crawford  Co. 

PRINTERS  and  BINDERS.  80  Lafayette  Street,  New  York 


We  printed  this  Camp  Travis  Book 
[337] 


>F  00909